Archive | August, 2012

Crime spree hits Junction City businesses

Crime spree hits Junction City businesses

Posted on 30 August 2012 by admin

photo by Jeanni Cuthbertson
This wheelbarrow of flowers, displayed outside Remains of the Day on Sixth Avenue was found last week tipped over with the flowers strewn across the sidewalk. A recent crime spree in downtown has some business owners wondering how to keep their businesses safe.

Police department urges businesses to keep alarms on and install cameras to prevent criminal activity

by Sayde Moser
for The Tribune
JUNCTION CITY – Several Sixth Avenue businesses were the victims of an unusual crime spree earlier this month.
Donna Galusha at Kelley’s Barber Shop on the corner of Sixth and Holly came to open up shop last week to find the right side of the door frame ripped off, breaking the lock on the door. Yet, nothing was missing and the only damage was to the door and the gumball machine, which had been moved and knocked over.
“These machines can sometimes have a couple hundred bucks in them,” she said. But the criminals didn’t try to get the money out; rather it looked to Donna like they tried moving the two candy machines out the door. One machine was moved away from the wall and closer to the door, making Donna assume they got spooked and ran off before hauling it off.
“It honestly sounds like some kids to me,” she said, although she seemed perplexed on exactly how they were able to rip part of the doorframe off. “Come six o’clock on a week day, this whole downtown area is closed up for the night and there is no one around.”
Donna leaves her lights on all night to deter break ins and in the three years she has been running the barber shop she has never before been broken into. Her dad ran the business for 30 years and it has always been in the same downtown location.
“It’s just irritating,” she said. “We really need to keep our eyes open for anything suspicious happening down here, because whoever did this came from somewhere and it’s hard to believe no one saw them.”
Just across the tracks at Farmers Insurance, agent Kym Housley found evidence of a break-in just a week prior to Kelley’s Barber Shop. They didn’t get in, however, but the lock had been tampered with and the newly painted door was damaged.
Again on Sixth Avenue, B & I Hardware was broken into on the night of Aug. 21. Leona Housten showed up around 7am and headed upstairs to clock in when she found the safe tipped over with a fist-sized hole in the side.
“It appears that they used a pick axe to pick through the side,” she said. The robbers left the tools, which they had borrowed off the shelves downstairs. They weren’t able to make off with all the cash that was inside, since they never got the door off the safe. But apparently they took whatever they could reach from inside the hole.
“It was definitely hard work and we figure they were here for a couple hours at least,” she said. “We do feel like we were targeted because nothing else was stolen. They went straight for the safe.”
The robbers entered the lumberyard through the alley and broke down the door using material they gathered from the lumber yard. In the 17 years Leona has worked at B & I, she said they have never experience a break in like this.
Police Chief Mark Chase told The Tribune News that Officer Mike Bonner is doing foot patrols downtown at night and his department is investigating the B & I incident.
Recently the department arrested two suspicious persons, one with stolen goods in a backpack and both with warrants out for their arrests. Chase couldn’t say if they were the ones responsible for the downtown break ins, but stressed that when his department is busy investigating other criminal activity in the city, they aren’t as available to patrol. He said there is a direct correlation between the number of officers who can be seen patrolling the city and the amount of burglaries and other crimes committed.
He advised business owners to install cameras and alarm systems if they don’t already have them and report any suspicious activity or people.
“We need the assistance and cooperation of the citizens of Junction City to help us do our job,” he said. “If you see someone that looks suspicious call it in and give as good of a description as you can.”
He urges people to note as many details as possible: hair color, height, what they are wearing, if they are carrying anything etc.
“We have a responsibility as a community to work together and keep the public safe,” he said.

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RRSC 08.29.12 Irving Grange market

Irving Grange Community Market

Posted on 30 August 2012 by admin

The outdoor market offers handmade gift items, food, music and fun

For the Tribune
SANTA CLARA – Mark your calendars for the first Saturdays of the month and support your community by attending the Irving Grange Community Market on Irvington Drive in Santa Clara.
Begun as an idea to utilize the grange’s property, primary market organizer, Sarah Sabri made the proposal at a grange meeting earlier this year.
The outdoor market, which boasts about 30 vendors selling handmade jewelry, outdoor décor, greeting cards and fresh flowers, and well as apparel, crocheted items and earlier in the season, plant starts.
We’re still looking for farmers,” said Sara, who added that they do have a community produce table now.
“You can donate your produce or exchange for something, or anyone can take what they want and donate what they want. The money goes to the market.”
The Irving Grange Market is a collaboration between the market and the grange.
“We give a very small cut to the grange,” said Sarah. “Their hope is to draw attention to the grange. It rents out the hall and it hopes to bring in more community involvement.”
She said the vendors they have now are very supportive and excited to make the market a success. “We need more people to stop by and see what’s going on.”
In addition to a variety of products, gifts and handmade items, visitors can enjoy lunch and listen to music while they visit the market.
“We have volunteers who perform live music about half the day,” said Sarah.
Hours for the market are 10am-4pm the first Saturday of each month. The market will be held next this Saturday, Sept. 1 and then again on Oct. 6 with a November break. The market will reopen as an indoor market Dec. 1. Then, the market will start up again in May next spring.
The Irving Grange Community Market is located at 1011 Irvington Drive between the NW Expressway and River Road.
For more information about the market or to become a vendor, visit www.irvingmarket.blogspot.com, email Irvingmarket@gmail.com or call 541.844.1534/503.515.2490.

 

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freemusicclipart

Monroe Labor Day Music Festival this weekend

Posted on 30 August 2012 by admin

All monies generated will go to help the local food bank

MONROE – Sept. 1, Labor Day weekend, will mark the first ever music festival in Monroe. And founder Dudley Clark thinks it will be a huge hit.
As owner of Hard Times Distillery in downtown Monroe, Clark has been pondering ways to bring the community together for the last four years.
“As the years rolled by, I started to know more about our community, I spent a lot of time here and met a lot of people,” he told the council last week. “So combining the knowledge of what the community is all about and the fact that we are right downtown and I have the knowledge and skill sets to make something happen, I thought, what if I got sponsorships and made something happen and did it in conjunction with the city.”
Clark has been testing the waters to see if there is any interest in the community and already has several local vendors lined up, enough live music entertainment to last from 10am-8pm and a raffle with two complete computer systems, professionally-made cakes and other local treasures. All the money generated will go to help the local food bank.
“If this thing takes off, we should develop a 501(c)3 for it and the bank will put together an account so people can donate money,” Clark said.
Clark envisions turning the area behind his store into a stage for the musicians. Hull Oaks has agreed to donate the porta potties and possibly the wood for building the stage.
“It will essentially be cost free,” Clark reiterated, adding, “This will actually stay somewhat small, rural and owned by Monroe. If the first one works and the vendors and musicians like it, then knowledge of the event will spread and next year we will increase it to two days.”
Once the new library is open, Clark hopes to use the terrace for events, as well as adding hot air balloon rides and a bouncy-house castle for little kids. If the music entertainment becomes too big for the space, he mentioned moving it to the baseball field in years to come.
“We could be creating a situation where people come to Monroe, park and just walk it,” he stated. “Here is a chance for people to learn that Monroe is an active community with lots of interesting people. It will give the town something they can do at the end of summer and the money goes to help people.”
Clark mentioned that if they ever raised more money than the food bank needed, they could start donating to other community organizations, like the senior center.
“This could very well be a ground breaking thing for Monroe. We could create an event that our kids remember and we are creating memories.”

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Alpine Century Ride raises more than $4,000

Posted on 30 August 2012 by admin

MONROE – The sixth annual Alpine Century Ride took place on Saturday, Aug. 11 and raised more than $4,000 for Alpine Community Center’s 2012-2013 operating costs.
Alpine Century continues to bring new cycling visitors to our small rural community from California, Ashland, Bend, Portland, Seattle, Nevada and Idaho.
“Bringing these visitors into the area to share our fabulous, scenic cycling and hospitality is part of the joy of this event,” explained event coordinator Mike Ripley. “Another is the opportunity it gives to bring the small rural Alpine community together.”
More than 50 volunteers shared their time and talent to bring this event to life.
Alpine Century income funds the facility and programs of the all-volunteer non-profit Alpine Community Center such as the Alpine Co-op Preschool, Alpine Recycling Center, Alpine Holiday Festival, First Friday, Bingo, Teens in Action, Ford Foundation Training Classes and a gathering place for the community
The 2012 Alpine Century received sponsorship support from REI, Peak Sports, Benton-Lane Winery, Corvallis Cyclery, Consumers Power, Pioneer Telephone Cooperative and South Benton Community Enhancement.

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JC 08.22.12 david bock pic 2

Immersed in music

Posted on 30 August 2012 by admin

Local musician has a passion for all styles of music

By Gini Bramlett
For the Tribune
JUNCTION CITY – You could almost say David Bock grew up with a guitar in his hand. Born in Chicago and raised in Gainesville, Florida until the third grade, thenin Maryland until his junior year, Bock began developing his musical passion with classical violin doing recitals and playing in the school orchestra. He moved on to the saxophone in sixth grade and picked up the guitar along the way.
“I had a garage band with my buddies,” said Bock. “I’ve stuck with that (guitar) since then.”
In 1977, Bock, along with his family moved to Oregon. He was in high school at the time.
“I had a rough transition,” said Bock. “But eventually I fell in love with the clean air and the trees. I never thought I’d stay here, but I did.”
Bock attended college with the goal of majoring in music and teaching, but realized it really wasn’t what he wanted to do.
“I was always drawn back to music,” said Bock. “I just gotta play.”
He started playing professional gigs. One of the bands he put together, ‘Mr. Wizard,’ performs hard rock from the ‘Beatles, ACDC, Aerosmith and others.
“We’ve been in the area more than 20 years,” said Bock.
He’s also a member of ‘Etouffee,’ that plays a mixture of Zydeco, rock, blues and country.
“We call it swamp rock,” said Bock.
Over the years, Bock’s bands have been opening acts for the likes of Charlie Daniels, Merle Haggard, Restless Heart and Curtis Salgado. His music ranges from rock, blues, heavy metal, country, funk, Zydeco, Top 40 and even rap.
He’s taken his music to Alaska, Vegas, Seattle and other cities across the US. He’s played on Bourbon Street in New Orleans and at the Portland Waterfront Blues Festival, as well as local venues including the Scandinavian Festival and Bugsy’s in Junction City.
Recently his band played at Junction City Auto Body and at the Woodburn Racetrack at the Hot Rod Nationals – both for the Oregon Paralyzed Veterans of America.
“You can see that versatility is my strong suit,” Bock said.
Bock does live performances, teaches guitar, base and saxophone and does recordings. Call him at 541.998.1299.

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images

2012-2013 Junction City School Bus Schedule

Posted on 30 August 2012 by admin

ALL routes are the same as last year. If your address is not listed, please chose the closest one. If you are returning to the same school, your route will be the same.
NOTE: AM Kindergarten students will catch the bus as regular morning students and PM Kindergarten will ride home with regular afternoon students. Remember to have children at their bus stop at least 5 minutes prior to pick-up time. During the first two weeks of school, pick-up and arrival times may fluctuate. Your patience and understanding is greatly appreciated
Questions or Concerns? Call Randy at First Student
541-998-8222

First Student 2012-2013

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08.29.12 sports ada fish camp-resort

Ada Fishing Camp on Siltcoos Lake

Posted on 30 August 2012 by admin

photo by Gini Bramlett
A view of Ada Fishcamp on Siltcoos Lake from our boat. The camp offers solitude with amenities and activities such as fishing, bird watching, short hikes or just perching on one of the many wooden benches on the dock and enjoying the breathtaking sunsets.

By Gini Bramlett
For the Tribune
Vacations can be much-needed respites from the everyday routine. A change of environment can make all the difference in the world. I always say that I’m glad to get away now and then, but I’m just as happy to return home again.
My husband, Ron and I booked a camp spot at Ada Fishing Camp on Siltcoos Lake for four nights for a little R&R; boating, fishing, napping. You get the picture.
The secluded camp is located on the southeast side of the lake and at least half of the campsites are right on the water; mere feet from the door of our foldout camper. Just south of Florence and about 30 minutes inland from Hwy 101, most of the road is well paved with two lanes, but the last nine miles of the road is narrow and often curvy.
The best thing about Ada Fishing Camp was the solitude. During our stay (weekdays), only a few long term motorhomes were there – sans owners – so other than the camp owner and his family, we were virtually alone; just what we had hoped for. Considering all the issues that arose while we ‘vacationed,’ the solitude and tranquility was well appreciated and enjoyed.
The issues:
Broken faucet valve (was fine last time we used it) and broken phone screen from putting keys in phone pocket. (Don’t know what I was thinking).
After Ron worked months restoring antique boat motor, shroud broke loose due to broken pins. He’d epoxied makeshift pins (didn’t work)! Fortunately, the motor still did.
One of the camper slide outs went askew. A delicate science to setting up these bad boys, and if you don’t do it right, ‘bad’ things happen, such as stitching around window ripping, and door not opening or closing without struggle. Much time spent, problem pinpointed and fixed (although significant 8-inch ugly tear will cost a good part of paycheck to repair).
To Florence to connect to Internet at library. After an hour, with ‘help’ from librarian, she admitted system had lots of traffic and wasn’t always accessible. “Just keep trying,” she said more than once. “Sheesh!” I replied. (What a bust)!
Then came trailer hitch fiasco, ‘forgot the toothpaste and deodorant’ problem and ‘no batteries for camera’ issue, but I won’t burden you.
All we could do was laugh. We headed back to the camper, feasted on gourmet cheeses, salami and a baguette with juicy gravenstein apple slices, poured ourselves generous snifters of bourbon and listened to the water lapping the shore.
After all, we were on vacation.

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garycrum

The First Amendment

Posted on 21 August 2012 by admin

By Gary Crum
For the Tribune
JUNCTION CITY – I have a deep belief in our First Amendment rights and, as some of my tennis buddies might put it, practice them every chance I get. Over the 41 years we‘ve lived in the Junction City community, I have written more than 100 OpEd pieces and nearly 400 letters to the editor (Register-Guard, Junction City Times, then TriCounty News, TriCounty Tribune and now Tribune-News, the Eugene Weekly and one OpEd piece in the New York Times). As one of those tennis buddies again put it (accurately, if inelegantly) “Crum, you have a really big mouth.” My response? “Guilty, as charged.”
As I write, there are two things that are very important to me: first, I always identify myself as the writer; I have never written anything anonymously and never will. If you‘re ashamed or afraid to identify something as your work, don‘t publish it. Always give others the opportunity to respond to your comments knowing that they are your thoughts. Meaningful discourse can only occur in the context of honest open communication.
Secondly, I always carefully research any factual statements I present to be sure they are true and accurate. I always request readers to contact me if they question the accuracy of such factual information. I don‘t wish to chance the embarrassment and loss of credibility which accompanies inaccurate or untrue statements. If I‘m right on the facts, I will happily document the accuracy for you. If I‘m wrong, I‘ll (though probably not as happily) make a public apology and correction.
Not everyone who reads my submissions is a ‘fan.’ I‘ve been called everything from “really brilliant” to “really stupid”; from a “public servant” to a “public nuisance.” That‘s fine; I don‘t need everyone to agree with me. Diverse opinion is a key element of democracy and the free exchange of ideas and opinions contributes hugely to the greatness of our nation. However, I‘m always a bit upset when I receive anonymous letters attacking my character and loyalty to our country, suggesting I perform physical acts of which I‘m incapable, or on several occasions over the years, actually threatening my well-being.
Perhaps the most satisfying comments come from strangers who, hearing my name at a store, a restaurant or party or whatever, ask, “Are you the Gary Crum from Junction City?” When I reply, “Yes,” they continue, “I always read your letters and OpEds. I don‘t always agree with you, but I respect and appreciate your writing them and they make me think.” Admittedly I‘m getting old and sentimental, but such statements really mean a lot to me.
Recently, like many of you, I received a mailing warning of an effort by Wal-Mart to “sneak into Junction City.” I condemn this mailing as an abuse of those First Amendment Rights we so value.
First, the mailing is anonymous. No one has been willing to acknowledge they represent “Junction City Residents for a Local Economy,” the ghost organization who sent the mailing. The return address is the general address of a 140-unit apartment complex and the management firm was adamant in denying any association with or even knowledge of the mailing. In fact, the on-site manager asked my permission to copy the mailing and expressed significant displeasure that anyone would use the complex address on the mailing (all mail to residents includes the apartment number).
At the Junction City Planning Commission meeting addressed in the mailing, I publicly asked anyone responsible for the mailing to identify themselves so I could ask them questions regarding the mailing. Not surprisingly, no one acknowledged such involvement.
Anonymous mailings are cowardly. If you have a belief or a concern and wish to share it, great, but have the courage to publicly identify yourself as holding and expressing such concern or belief, and accept the accountability which accompanies the expression of ‘factual’ information it might contain. The mailing is riddled with misinformation and untruths. It is a patent attempt to stir-up public sentiment with falsehoods. It is both cowardly and dishonorable.
There‘s absolutely nothing wrong with rabble rousing. I‘ve been accused of that too. Frankly, often the ‘rabble’ (that means all of us) needs to be roused from our complacency. We need to be more aware and involved in decisions which impact our lives. However, it‘s really unfair to rouse others with untruths.
As always, I invite your response. If you wish to discuss the mailing and my assertion that it is cowardly, dishonorable and patently untrue, give me a call (I‘m in the book). If you know the person(s) responsible for the mailing, have them give me a call. I‘d REALLY like to visit with them.
Editor’s note: At the Aug. 16 meeting, the Planning Commission stated it has not  been contacted by, or made plans to contact Wal-Mart and was just as surprised to see the letter as everyone else.

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Building Blocks: family-run, flexible and fun

Building Blocks: family-run, flexible and fun

Posted on 21 August 2012 by admin

photo by Sayde Moser
Ron and Kim Volner (bottom right) have been running Building Blocks Christian Childcare & Preschool for 12 years, where they teach and entertain children of all ages.

JUNCTION CITY – As summer starts to reach its end, it’s time for parents to start thinking about where to enroll their children for preschool, or where to send them for after school care. One local option for parents in Junction City is Building Blocks Christian Childcare & Preschool.
Building Blocks is a state certified childcare center located on Greenwood Street between 6th and 5th avenues. From the front of the building it looks like any other downtown business, but when you walk through the door you immediately feel like you just entered another world as you are greeted by the very colorful surroundings and the noise of children busy at work or play. Just as you adjust to your environment, you are welcomed in by one of the friendly staff members and the peaceful atmosphere. As you look around you cannot help but notice the cleanliness and organization.
“We work hard to keep the facility clean, make it a lot of fun and be flexible and reliable. One of our biggest key factors is that we are very flexible,” said co-director Ron Volner. “We have a lot of parents with different schedules and different needs and we want to be available for them when they need us.”
Ron co-directs Building Blocks with his wife, Kim. They offer childcare year ‘round from 6am-6pm, and parents can reserve anytime during those hours for their children. They also offer preschool Monday through Friday from 8:30am-11am during the school year and an enrichment program for the kids during the summer.
The Volners have created their own preschool curriculum to help accommodate the children with flexible schedules and they also created a ‘pay-by-the-hour’ system for preschool students.
“It helps parents hone in on what they can afford,” Ron said. “Some parents might want the socialization and they will pay for a couple extra hours for their children to just interact with other kids. Others might only be able to afford the bare minimum, but they want their children to get the basic education of preschool. So we can accommodate both and the parents are in complete control of what it will cost them.”
Parents are also only charged for the time their children use. If their children get sick or the family takes a vacation, they won’t be charged for the time they didn’t use.
Ron and Kim, along with the help from their staff, have been running Building Blocks for 12 years now.
“We are family-run and very family-oriented,” Ron said. “We really view all our clients as part of the family and our six children often help out with things like the cleaning.”
The large amounts of different activities available each day accommodates children ranging from 30 months to 12 years old. The morning starts with free play and then breakfast. When the school kids get on the bus and head to school, preschool takes over. Once preschool ends, it is time for lunch and a rest period. Then it is time to prepare for the school kids to return to Building Blocks where the students will find snack waiting for them.
“Our goal is to give them a place to unwind and relax after school,” said Ron. “Our job is to make sure they stay busy, act appropriately and enjoy themselves while they are here.”
Several different activity stations offer fun and entertainment for everyone, including art supplies, Legos, books, puzzles, toys and even a large outdoor playground.
“Legos are a really big part of our afterschool program.” Ron said. “Building Blocks has one of the largest collections of Legos in the area and the kids absolutely love them.”
Building Blocks is currently enrolling for preschool and have limited openings for childcare and afterschool care. For more information, visit bbcchildcare.com or call 541.998.7619.

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Controversy over wetlands

Controversy over wetlands

Posted on 21 August 2012 by admin

photo by Sayde Moser
Junction City residents filed in to city hall last week in response to a local wetland inventory that identified wetlands on or near their property. The identification of wetlands can prohibit what some land owners are allowed to do with their property, based on regulations set forth by the State of Oregon.

By Sayde Moser
For The Tribune
JUNCTION CITY – It was standing room only inside council chambers last week at a public hearing with the planning commission. City councilors and citizens alike crowded inside for a chance to have a voice and listen to the planning commission’s decision on protection of local wetlands.
Since 1973, the state of Oregon has maintained a statewide program for land use planning in the form of 19 statewide planning goals. Fourteen of these goals apply directly to Junction City.
Goal 5 involves identifying and protecting wetlands. The state has mandated the procedures, standards and definitions involved in identifying wetlands and determining which wetlands are significant.
In 2008, the city began the process of identifying its wetlands and notifying property owners of wetlands on their property. The city held a number of open houses to help property owners understand the process of protecting wetlands.
In 2011, the final wetland inventory was completed and approved by the Department of State Lands and notices were sent to property owners identifying the wetlands. The city was then required to adopt an ordinance to either fully or partially protect its wetlands.
Full protection of significant wetlands would prohibit any sort of structure development or vegetation removal on that land, and possibly include removing current structures.
The city chose not to offer full protection on any existing wetlands.
Partial protection, which the city did choose, allows for property owners to maintain existing structures built on wetlands as well as mow their lawns, spray herbicide, replace vegetation and build additional structures, provided they aren’t built directly on top of the wetland. Partial protection does not require landowners to take out fences or other structures currently on wetlands.
Planning Commissioner Jason Thiesfield informed those present that if the city does not enforce some sort of protection, the state will take over and everyone will be subject to the state’s standards for protecting wetlands.
“If we don’t do something about it and try and give you guys as many rights as possible through our process, then the state is going to take over,” he said, adding that under the current local protection, property owners will not have to change their existing use of the property.
“If we gave these wetlands full protection, then you would probably have to tear down existing structures on wetlands, and you would be forced to change how you use that land,” he said. “We are trying to protect you guys as much as possible from the state with what we have available.”
The city also chose not to add a buffer zone, which many jurisdictions enforced. A buffer would be an area protected beyond the edge of the wetland.
“We haven’t added any wetlands at all,” said Jeff Hagg, also with the planning commission. “We got handed a list from the state with our wetlands, saying protect them or we will take over and do it. What we are trying to do is protect each person’s individual rights with the minimal amount of law imposed on your property.”
Numerous residents still voiced their dislike over the issue, especially those who have an easement on their property for a city drainage ditch. Those drainage ditches, installed in the 60s for the purpose of draining flood and rainwaters away from neighborhoods, have been recognized by the state as wetlands. The wetlands begin at the center of the ditch and extend outwards.
“Our objection to this proposal,” said Lou Hannavan, “is that the original goal or objective of drainage across private property is the polar opposite of a wetlands goal or objective of returning an area to its native state of vegetation and habitat for the benefit of the public. The proposal not only publicly takes privately owned property, without compensation, for a community asset, but requires the affected landowners to continue paying real estate taxes, liability insurance premiums and to suffer the financial impact of the decreased use and market value of their property.”
The Hannavans are petitioning signatures from residents to challenge the public taking of private property.

08-16-12 PC Part 1

08-16-12 PC Part 2


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Salmon and Trout Advisory Committee seeks mid-Willamette Valley representative

Posted on 21 August 2012 by admin

photo by Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife

The Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) is seeking qualified candidates to represent the mid-Willamette Valley district on the Salmon and Trout Enhancement Program (STEP) Advisory Committee.
Oregonians that are involved with local fishing or STEP groups, have previous experience working with volunteers and/or in community service, or are involved in natural resource or angling education are encouraged to apply. Candidates must be able to travel at least four times per year. The ideal candidate will be a resident of the mid-Willamette Valley, which includes the communities of Salem, Dallas, Kings Valley, Corvallis, Junction City, Albany, Veneta, Eugene, Sweet Home, Lebanon, Mill City and Detroit.
The major stream basins in this area include Rickreall Creek, North Santiam River, South Santiam River, Calapooia River, Luckiamute River, Mary’s River, Long Tom River and middle section of the Willamette River from north of Eugene to Salem.
The successful candidate will serve a four-year term, with the possibility of re-appointment for a total term of eight years.
STEP was created by the Oregon Legislature in 1981 to provide a way for volunteers to participate in the restoration of native stocks of salmon, steelhead and trout.
The committee is comprised of 13 members representing all regions of Oregon.
Members are appointed by the Governor and meet quarterly in various communities throughout the state to conduct STEP business and advise the Fish and Wildlife Commission on issues regarding STEP. Committee members are volunteers; however, business-related expenses are reimbursed.
This recruitment will remain open until filled, though candidates are encouraged to apply by Sept. 7, 2012.
For more information about STEP and directions to application materials, go to www.dfw.state.or.us/fish/STEP or contact Kevin Herkamp, ODFW Salmon and Trout Enhancement Program Coordinator, at 503.947-6232 or kevin.herkamp@state.or.us. Application materials also can be found at http://governor.oregon.gov/Gov/boards.shtml.

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SONY DSC

Tigers Playing Canadian Team

Posted on 21 August 2012 by admin

photo by Kyle Krenik

Junction City High School Head Coach Mark Henderson works with players at this year’s summer camp in preparation for a pre-season game with Mount Douglas High School from Victoria, British Columbia. The game will be held Aug. 31 at 7pm at Junction City High School.

 

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back-to-school

District-wide registration for ‘new to the district’ students in Junction City

Posted on 21 August 2012 by admin

JUNCTION CITY – For the first time, the Junction City School District is going to have a district-wide registration for all ‘new to the district’ students. Parents will no longer have to go to each school to register their kids. The School District is trying a new Central Registration for New Student Registration. New Student Registration is for all students who did not attend JCHS, Oaklea Middle, Laurel Elementary or Territorial Elementary schools the previous school year, (all grades levels) are considered new to the district and will register in the Junction City High School Cafeteria on the following dates:
Aug. 21 – Kindergartners: 1:30-3:30pm
Aug. 22 – Grades K-12: 8:30am-noon, Grades K-12: 1-3:30pm
Aug. 23 – Grades K-12: 8:30am-noon, Grades K-12: 1-3:30pm
Aug. 24 – Registration will be available at the student’s school building for students unable to register on the 22 or 23 in the high school cafeteria. School begins with a full class day on Sept. 4 at 8am. For more information, contact Junction City School District at. 541.998.6311.

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school board

Preparing for disaster

Posted on 21 August 2012 by admin

photo by Sayde Moser
School board members Anthony Knox and Wayne Swango, along with Superintendant Brian Wolf, reviewed and accepted the updated emergency preparedness plan, presented by Bob Tatum. The new plan implements ‘shelter-in-place,’ where students and staff stay sheltered at various locations on campus in the event of toxic fumes leaking into the air.

by Sayde Moser
For The Tribune

HARRISBURG – It has been years in the making, but the Harrisburg School Board finally adopted an updated emergency preparedness plan.
The plan was revised and updated by Bob Tatum, coordinator for the Readiness and Emergency Management for Schools Grant and reflects today’s standard for protecting school children and staff from an emergency.
One of the biggest changes to the old emergency plan is a procedure called ‘shelter-in-place.’ It was Tatum’s recommendation that the emergency plan reflect this procedure, where students and staff would shelter-in-place at various locations inside the school buildings in the event of toxic fumes from a truck or train outside affecting the air quality.
If you are in one of the new buildings, shelter-in-place there and shut own the ventilation,” Tatum said. “If you are in the kindergarten, middle school or elementary school buildings, get to the cafeteria or closest new building and shelter there.”
This does propose a challenge for those students and staff members because it requires going outside to get to the cafeteria. Tatum said ideally the school should get a grant to enclose the walkway and eliminate the number of people who might be exposed to toxic fumes.
“Every time I hear shelter-in-place, the hair goes up on the back of my neck,” said Board Member Paul Christensen, stating he would like to see a contingency plan that involved moving to another designated shelter some distance away.
“We have a strong favoritism to shelter-in-place for just about everything and I think there should be contingencies,” he said. “If we can’t shelter-in-place, what is our alternative? I sure don’t want to be stuck sheltering in place because we don’t have an alternative.”
Tatum answered that it is always a case-by-case basis.
“It is always going to be a judgment call,” he said. “I don’t think any emergency plans are intended to overrule common sense. Because there are so many ifs, ands or buts on what could be happening in any situation. You have to make that call; are the kids safer inside or outside?”
The emergency preparedness plan will be reviewed each year by the board.
“I think we have a good plan here, but there is always room for continuous improvement,” Tatum said. “As you see other issues or think about issues, as laws change or you hear about some emergency that happened at another school, we will incorporate those changes and lessons into our plan.”
The school will also run practice tests and have reviews based on each test to tweak or modify the plan as needed. Certain staff members have been given expert training to deal with emergency situations and will be in charge of training the rest of the staff as well as running drills. Debbie Darst will be in charge of maintaining and updating the plan as changes are made.
“Let’s make sure the people in charge are clear on what to do and can delegate in a way that doesn’t cause confusion,” Christensen emphasized.

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LCC Car Show

LCC Car Show

Posted on 19 August 2012 by admin

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City of Harrisburg taking steps to provide transportation for residents

City of Harrisburg taking steps to provide transportation for residents

Posted on 14 August 2012 by admin

HARRISBURG –Providing a bus to Junction City that could connect with the LTD buses to and from Eugene is something that has been on the city council’s plate of ideas for a few months now.
While the project is still in its infant stages, City Administrator Bruce Cleeton has spoken with Harrisburg School District Superintendent Brian Wolf about the possibility of using one of the district’s buses and drivers. Cleeton said that Wolf seemed supportive of the idea and he was asked to attend the school board meeting last Monday to discuss it with the rest of the board.
“At first it didn’t look like we would probably even get it going at all but it sounds like maybe something could happen as far as getting the school’s help to make it move forward,” Councilor Robert Boese said. “It looks very optimistic right now but there are some things that need to be concreted before it can go any further.”
“We still haven’t gotten into the most important part which is seeing if the finances will work out,” Cleeton reminded the council.  “But one important part in trying to see if the finances will work is to get some idea of how much ridership there will be. I am inclined to think the next step we should take before we start trying to crunch some numbers would be to send out a survey or offer it online to find out how much interest there is by the citizens.”
With the blessing of the school district, the city will put together a survey to gage the interest of Harrisburg residents in having a bus service to connect with LTD.
Cleeton said he felt people in Junction City might also benefit from the service, if they work in Harrisburg or if kids in the summertime wanted to use the skate park.
But it’s not set in stone just yet.
“If I were to bet on whether or not it is going to happen, I would still feel comfortable saying that it won’t happen, but we won’t know until we see if the finances will work,” said Cleeton.  “Hopefully if we do a survey and there is considerable interest, that would help us get a grant at least for the first year and then we can work on the finances of supporting it and seeing how much ridership we actually end up getting.”

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Reaching out

Reaching out

Posted on 14 August 2012 by admin

by Sayde Moser
for The Tribune
JUNCTION CITY – Jackson Hague is six years old, with golden blond hair, twinkling eyes and a laugh that can make even the grumpiest of old men break out in a smile. It is easy to see he is in love with life, although his life hasn’t always been the easiest.
Jackson was officially diagnosed with autism when he was three. His parents, Jason and Sarah, started seeing the signs around age two, when his vocabulary started to dwindle and he stopped looking them in the eyes. Immediately, Jason and Sarah started tapping into many of the resources and support groups available for families with autistic children.
“The programs in Eugene are terrific,” Sarah said. “But on a more local level, the community support wasn’t very active.”
Jason has been a pastor at Christ’s Center for two years now, where Sarah also works as the Children Administrative Leader. A year ago, they decided to start an autism-specific program at the church on Sunday mornings so parents had somewhere safe to leave their children while they attended service.
“Our goal has been just to help support those parents, because we know what it’s like,” stated Jason. “We could hardly go anywhere with Jackson because it is hard to keep him contained. A lot of times if we would try to go to church, one of us would just end up leaving because he wasn’t able to sit still that long. And there are other parents out there who don’t even bother trying to go to church because they know how difficult it is.”
Jason and Sarah were able to hire a teacher who works for ‘A Child’s Garden’ in Eugene and has the special skills and training needed to care for children with autism. She is there every Sunday from 9am until service is over, offering a less structured alternative to a normal day care.
The room reserved for this program is filled with sensory objects and toys, giving each child a chance to relax, escape and play safely while his or her parents are enjoying the service.
So far, four to five children show up every week.
“It is a great avenue for parents who would like to come to church and want to feel secure knowing their child is getting the care and attention he needs from a professional,” said Jason.
The children also get to stay for service as long as they can manage before they are shuffled back to the playroom, letting their parents stay and finish service. They range in ages from three to 10 and are currently all boys.
“For a lot of parents it is emotionally difficult to deal with this reality,” Jason said. “This can give both them and the kids a chance to relieve some stress and just relax. One in 88 children in Oregon will be diagnosed with autism, and while coming to church for a few hours on a Sunday morning might be small in the scope of things, it is one small thing we can do for these families to bless them and let them see that they aren’t alone.”
“I hope it continues to bless other families and I hope other churches pick up a similar program,” added Sarah. “There is a huge group of people in our area who are not able to participate in church because of a disability like this and we want to be able to help them as much as we can, because we understand what it’s like.”
Jason and Sarah have four other children, two older and two younger than Jackson. Jason said his daughters are already becoming activists for special needs children.
Jackson attends school at Laurel Elementary with mostly other autistic children.

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To our fine community

To our fine community

Posted on 14 August 2012 by admin

By Steve Rowland
For The Tribune
Your community newspaper, The Tribune News, is here to stay. As you know, our staff and printing and web are supported by advertisers and subscribers. We have now designed our newspaper to flex its pages and content based upon a formula that is composed of the number of ads and the number of subscribers, per each weekly copy. This will give The Tribune News stability and allow it to function for years to come.
The Tribune News staff decided last spring that the printed newspaper must have a website that complements the information we offer our readers—we have done that!
We have enhanced our website to include pictures and stories that don’t fit in the weekly paper. We have found that most readers – and we have approximately 4,000 of them – like to read 200-500 word stories. So, for most stories longer than that, we will put the longer version on our website, www.YourTribuneNews.com. If a longer version of a story is available on YourTribuneNews.com it will be noted at the end of the article in the newspaper.
Also on the website are archived stories and pictures from the past few months of production. This website will grow and so will its information—Check it out.
Thank you all for supporting The Tribune News.

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Hospital breaks ground

Hospital breaks ground

Posted on 14 August 2012 by admin

By Vera Westbrook
For the Tribune
JUNCTION CITY – A long awaited dream has finally become a reality. Trucks have been spotted on the Department of Corrections (DOC) site south of Junction City off Hwy 99 indicating that work on the JC state mental hospital has finally begun.
“The trucks are clearing and grubbing right now,” said Oregon State Hospital Replacement Project Administrator Jodie Jones, “and they are also in the process of hauling in gravel to build the site up, which will occur into September.”
Additional trailers will be moved on site in late September and early October to house Hoffman Construction Company personnel and state hospital project administrators.
“Hoffman Construction is the main entity in control of the site right now,” Jones said, that also will be in charge of the entire project.
The trailer complex on the DOC site will be the headquarters for Hoffman Construction during the project. The trailers will also make room for meeting space and office space where Jones herself will have an office. She’ll be available in her JC office on Wednesdays starting in October to speak with interested parties in person.
Aside from establishing offices on site, Hoffman Construction is also busy reaching out to the community to gather interested businesses to help complete the hospital project.
Hoffman Outreach Consultant Marin Arreola is busy arranging an Aug. 23 meeting for larger companies throughout Oregon to establish an avid networking system for businesses involved in the hospital project. Small businesses are invited to attend the meeting as well.
“It’s a working event where people could meet, exchange business cards and develop a relationship,” Arreola said. “We are targeting contractors, but the meeting is open to small businesses also.”
Arreola hosted a similar meeting on July 31 at the JC High School cafeteria where about 70 local small businesses showed up. Those same businesses are encouraged to attend the Aug. 23 meeting to participate in networking.
This meeting will differ in that subcontractors will be targeted and a networking component will be added. But the goal of the meeting is the same.
“We want to keep the work local and we want to create local jobs,” Arreola said.
The Thursday, Aug. 23 meeting will be held from 1-3pm at the Oaklea Middle School cafeteria on 1515 Rose St. in Junction City. To register for the meeting or for more information, contact Hoffman Outreach Consultant Marin Arreola at 503.999.5022 or by email at advancedecon@aol.com.

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The story of a little lost dragon

The story of a little lost dragon

Posted on 14 August 2012 by admin

By Gini Bramlett
For the Tribune
MONROE – If you live in Monroe, you may have spotted a purple dragon making its way around town a couple of weeks ago looking for its home. The little guy made stops at various locations asking those it encountered if they knew where he lived.
The dragon in question is the main character in a book written and photographed by The Teen Time Gang, a group of eight students who were part of the summer Art in the Park program.
Program director, Lori Bechtold, a Monroe teacher and the driving force behind the increasingly popular art program, was approached by Lonnie and Alison Hellwege who volunteered to teach a week of photography to the group.
“I get fabulous guest artists. The Hellwege’s always come up with fabulous projects for the teens to do,” said Bechtold. “They had the idea of doing a book.”
The teens did everything required to produce their own book by week’s end including creating the character and the premise, writing the text and directing and taking photos at various venues around town. The Hellweges helped them put it all together.
“All of our kids did a tremendous job,” said Bechtold.
Last Tuesday morning, the unveiling took place at the Monroe Public Library where librarian, Lori Pelkey, read ‘Home at Last, The Story of a Little Dragon’ to the kids who attended Storytime.
Copies of the book are located at the library and another is displayed at the bank for the community to enjoy.
Good news is the dragon did find its home. But you’ll have to find out where he lives at www.facebook.com/MonroeArtInTheParkTeenTimeGang.

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