Archive | September, 2012

502fdd694cf24.preview-620

Coburg water rates study to be completed in January

Posted on 26 September 2012 by admin

COBURG – The City of Coburg has solicited proposals for a Water Rates Study to update the 2006 study. The focus is to ensure the City’s water and reclaimed waste water facilities have sufficient, defensible funding to meet the current and future needs of the system.
The City Council will consider the recommendations from the study and may amend water system policies as a result.
The target completion date for the Water rates study is January, 2013.
If you are interested in this process, please note City council agendas and/or website updates. City Council materials are available at City Hall and at www.coburgoregon.org.
The City of Coburg owns and operates a water system which supplies about 3,500 residents and employees through 500 connections. Contact Bob Butler, Public Works director with general questions about your water service at 541.682.7857.

Comments (0)

New and improved

Posted on 26 September 2012 by admin

By Steve Rowland

In the past few weeks we have made some improvements to The Tribune News.
First, we have started having shorter sports stories and have augmented them with video clips that are available on our website, YourTribuneNews.com. Second, we have begun running mug shots, with names, of those who have been arrested by a JCPD officer or incarcerated at the Junction City jail. Third, we have begun paying more attention to our front page, sometimes it may appear a bit shocking and at other times a bit ‘soft.’ Fourth, we have developed a procedure for having more timely news.
For sports, it has been realized that the majority of the readers would appreciate game clips rather than read a play by play. As our technique improves, our local sports, with interviews, will make our website an interesting place to visit.
For mug shots, it has become a reality that some people would like to hide in our community – and by ‘community’ I mean Harrisburg, Junction City, Monroe and Coburg. This public safety service by The Tribune News has been given a positive reception all over town, except by those who have seen their picture in that section.
We want the front page to be both informative and community-sensitive. No matter what, we want it to be community oriented – we have gotten a positive response on this approach.
Timely news throughout the week – we have begun publishing LOCAL news stories, often with video on our website. An example is the recent tragedy of the young man who was killed by an Amtrak train. We arrived within minutes of the accident, interviewed the JCPD for the correct story, and had the story on our website within an hour. Our story was accurate and compassionate for the family – we were surprised by the various twists that other media services put on the story.
Remember, The Tribune News is here to serve our communities. Help us by emailing us with your opinions of what we have done.

Comments (0)

local aid jar

Junction City Local Aid needs your help

Posted on 26 September 2012 by admin

JUNCTION CITY – Junction City Local Aid is holding its first ‘Help Your Neighbors Business Challenge!” Each participating business will actively raise money for Junction City Local Aid throughout the month of October.
Jimmybear Graphics has made first- and second-place trophies for the winners to display. The first place winner will have a picture and article in the Tribune.
Businesses participating in the challenge can send weekly updates to the email address on the registration form bragging about funds collected or taunting other participating businesses. They will appear in the Tribune.
The residents of Junction City Retirement have donated time and effort into decorating collection containers for each participating business.
If you are interested in participating, pick up a collection container from JC Local Aid, the Chamber Office or AA Automotive.

Comments (1)

Organ transplants; making the numbers personal

Posted on 26 September 2012 by admin

By Teri Kohley
For the Tribune

LANE COUNTY – According to the Pacific Northwest Transplant Bank, more than 7,500 Americans donate to organ banks each year. Yet every year thousands of people languish on organ transplant waiting lists (115,058 currently), hoping against the odds that tomorrow will be their lucky day, or the next day, or the next.
And on average, 18 of these people will die every day while awaiting their transplant.
The problem with such numbers is that they often remain just that, mere numbers on a page with no real emotional connection to our everyday lives until they hit close to home and take on a human face.
Five years ago, those numbers became all too real for my family. My sister, Renee Dale started dialysis and has since became one of those people added to OHSUs active waiting list, needing a dual kidney and pancreas transplant to save her life. We now stay close to home and wait for that life-saving call every day.
Now in her 40s, my sister was diagnosed with Type-1 diabetes at the time of her 11th birthday, becoming one of the more than 13,000 new cases the CDC reports are diagnosed every year; more numbers that have become part of my family‘s daily reality.
As a child, my sister learned how to inject herself with insulin, and how to live a life restricted by the realities of her disease. She had her first heart attack at the age of 35, and since then has had open-heart surgery and five stints placed in her heart. She now averages seven trips to the ER a year, and has dialysis three days a week to extend her life while waiting for her dual transplant.
If matching organs become available, my sister will no longer have diabetes. For the first time since she was initially diagnosed she will be free from the need for insulin injections. She will be free from painful and life-consuming dialysis. And she will finally be free to live her life unencumbered by the harsh realities she has faced for the past 36 years.
But another harsh reality we‘ve been forced to face is that becoming a donor recipient involves far more than luck; it takes money; lots of money. Even with insurance, it will cost Renee between $10,000 and $20,000 in after care expenses. A recipient must have the financial resources to pay for the required extended stay, but more importantly the insurance to cover the anti-rejection prescription drugs which cost $1,000-$3,000 a month for life.
Why should this one person‘s story resonate for us as a community? Because it means that the poorest among us; those with the greatest need, and no health insurance coverage may not be able to receive an organ transplant. And with the dramatic rise in childhood obesity, juvenile diabetes and diabetes in general more and more of us will have our lives directly affected by those mere numbers on a page.
Our family has responded as most will in such situations. We‘ve added our names to the organ donor registry. We‘re trying to raise sufficient funds to ensure that my sister is able to take advantage of the opportunity to receive those organs if and when they become available. And we‘ve curtailed any trips outside the area so that we can be in Portland within a few hours of that phone call.
Those aren‘t big or noble sacrifices on our part; just necessary ones.
My hope in writing this column is that more people in our communities will register at the DMV or through the Pacific Northwest Transplant Bank (pntb.org) and add their names to the organ donor registry. Your donated organs can help save lives and positively impact more than 50 lives through the donation of tissue and cornea.
Beyond that, I encourage you to participate in the prevention activities for childhood obesity and juvenile diabetes. Contribute to fundraisers for those planning for transplant or donate to their transplant funds. Volunteer with the American Diabetes Association here in Lane County and help people get to dialysis or with other tasks.
Together, we can make a personal difference in the numbers.
To donate to the Renee Dale Fund, visit www.giveforward.com or at SELCO Credit Union, Renee Dale SPK Transplant Fund or mail to: Renee Dale SPK Transplant Fund, 1355 Inglewood Ave., Eugene, OR  97401.

Teri Kohley and Renee Dale both live in the North Eugene area.

Comments (0)

Dry weather could mean more land closures for deer hunters

Posted on 26 September 2012 by admin

SALEM – With the opening of the rifle deer season on Saturday, Sept. 29, Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) and Oregon Department of Forestry (ODF) are warning hunters they may find more private forestlands closed this year due to the high fire danger.
“This year, it’s more important than ever that hunters check for closures before heading afield and follow fire restrictions,” said Tom Thornton, ODFW game program manager.
Mike Dykzeul with the Oregon Forest Industries Council estimates that 50 percent more private lands are closed this year than at the same time last year.
Forestland managers say forest vegetation is extremely dry. Although light rainfall fell in some areas, moisture content in vegetation in western Oregon ranges from 10-20 percent, while east of the Cascades it is in single digits.
“Under these parched conditions, any fire started could spread rapidly,” said Dan Postrel, Oregon Department of Forestry.
ODF keeps a list of landowner closures on its website. It changes frequently and lands could be opened if Oregon gets some significant wet weather, though current forecasts aren’t predicting rain this week. Hunters should check back before the season opener or the day they plan to hunt for the latest information. www.oregon.gov/ODF/Pages/fire/corporate_closure.aspx.
Hunters that don’t see their local landowner listed should call them directly.

Comments (0)

Pleasant Hill upsets Harrisburg

High School Football Round Up!

Posted on 26 September 2012 by admin

Monroe couldn’t stop Coquille.
MONROE – The Monroe Dragons football team struggled to stop the run game and dropped a 40-6 non-conference game on the road Friday night against Coquille. Monroe has a bye week next Friday and plays at Glendale in two weeks.

Pleasant Hill upsets Harrisburg
HARRISBURG – Pleasant Hill Billies football squad scored 41 points and limited the visiting Harrisburg Eagles to 7 in the Billies league win on Friday. Coming up next, the Eagles play the Toledo Boomers in a 3A PacWest battle, on Friday. Harrisburg will attempt to advance on its 1-3 season record. The Boomers go into the battle with a 1-3 record after their 27-13 league win over Jefferson.

Junction City Struggled With North Marion
JUNCTION CITY – Friday’s non-league match, the visiting North Marion Huskies football squad scored a close 26-19 victory over the Junction City Tigers. The Tigers (2-2) will now prepare for match against La Pine. The Hawks enter the 4A Sky-Em bout with a 2-2 record. In their last bout, La Pine was nudged by Burns 55-0, in a non-league bout.

Comments (0)

High School Volleyball Round Up!

Posted on 26 September 2012 by admin

JUNCTION CITY – The Sisters Outlaws volleyball team scored 3 points and limited the host Junction City Tigers to 0 in the Outlaws league victory on Tuesday. The crowd at Thursday’s league bout between the Cottage Grove Lions and the visiting Junction City Tigers, saw Cottage Grove’s volleyball squad upset Junction City by a tally of 3-0. The Tigers now own a 3-7 record. They play next when they host Sweet Home for a 4A Sky-Em bout on Tuesday, Sept. 25. Junction City will confront the Sweet Home Huskies team coming off a league loss. The Huskies record now stands at 1-4.

HARRISBUG – Harrisburg Eagles volleyball team, went down 3-0 in Tuesday’s league challenge with the host Santiam Christian Eagles. In Thursday’s league battle, the host Harrisburg Eagles volleyball team scored a 3-1 triumph over the Toledo Boomers. The Harrisburg Eagles (6-7) will now prepare for their battle against Chemawa Indian. The Braves come into the 3A PacWest battle with a 0-4 record.

MONROE – Tuesday’s league battle, the visiting Oakridge Warriors volleyball team scored a 3-1 triumph over the Monroe Dragons. Dragons encounter the Glendale Pirates in a 2A Mountain View battle, on Thursday, but finished short with a 3-1 loss.

Comments (0)

Cheshire resident Corinne Bienvenue celebrates 100 years

Cheshire resident Corinne Bienvenue celebrates 100 years

Posted on 26 September 2012 by admin

Family Photo
Connie Bienvenue sports a crown at her 100th birthday bash on Sunday at the home of her son and daughter-in-law, Andrew and Karyne Bienvenue in Cheshire. Guests from around the US and even Taiwan attended her milestone event.

Guests from as far away as Taiwan came to help her celebrate on Sunday

By Gini Bramlett
For the Tribune

CHESHIRE – Corinne ‘Connie’ Bienvenue’s secrets to a long life include living simply, being loving to everyone, eating properly and being happy in what you do. Connie turned 100 years old on Sunday, so she should know.
“This way you will be happy and healthy,” said Connie, who rode her bike daily until quite recently. “That’s the way I’ve lived and I didn’t fuss about anything. I tried to be a good girl all through my life, and I still do.”
Her milestone birthday was celebrated on Sunday with a party at the home of her son and daughter-in-law; Andrew and Karyne Bienvenue in Cheshire. The bash was attended by nearly 100 guests – family and friends – from as far away as Washington DC, Texas and even Taiwan.
Connie was born and raised in Manchester, NH “to a very loving family.” She was favored by both parents and her siblings.
“I always preferred to be running around outdoors, and my siblings would have to hunt me down and get me cleaned up and in the house in time for dinner or face the music. My father could be stern about manners.” said Connie. “I remember on Saturdays he would say, ‘Bring me your shoes,’ and he would polish six pairs of shoes to be ready for church on Sundays.”
Singing in the choir with her sisters is a fond memory for Connie,
“We were quite good,” she said. “We loved to go to church.”
Connie met her husband in the choir when she 20 and he was 18. All the other boys were interested in her, but she only had eyes for Irving ‘Benny’ Bienvenue.
“Oh, he was so good looking,” Connie crooned. “I wasn’t boy crazy. I was choosy!”
The couple was married for 50 years when Benny passed away at age 65.
“He was the love of my life.”
The couple raised seven children who produced 15 grandchildren, 23 great grandchildren, and so far, four great great grandchildren.
Connie is nearly blind now, so she spends much of her time listening to the radio. She enjoys church music and music from the 20s, 30s and 40s and avidly follows the Ducks and current events. Just don’t ask her about our current president. You’ll get an earful with some colorful language.
Happy Birthday, Connie!

Comments (0)

library_books_5516

City of Harrisburg commits to building new library

Posted on 18 September 2012 by admin

By Sayde Moser
For the Tribune
HARRISBURG – The city council has for quite some time showed an interest in helping build a new library and made that interest an official resolution last week.
The Harrisburg Library Guild has been putting together packets of information to solicit for grants from foundations to cover the construction of a new library. A resolution indicating the city’s intent and financial contributions would help the solicitation process.
The resolution includes providing sufficient land for a new library and parking lot. The land mapped out for the project is located in city-owned property on the south side of Smith Street between 4th Street and the fire station.
It also designates the $160,000 from the sale of the Upmyer House (which the city originally bought with the intention of making it the new library, but later sold for a small profit) to go towards the project. The city also agreed to add an additional $100,000 from the building reserve line of the community and economic development fund towards the library, totaling $260,000 of contributions from the city.
“It will make our city’s contributions towards this project more reasonable to the grant foundations and they will in turn be more likely to approve a grant for this project,” said City Administrator Bruce Cleeton in his staff report.
“Most grants want to see something on your part,” said Library Guild Member LeAnne Hart-Chambers. “They want to see that you are actively pursuing this and the more you are able to contribute on your own, the more likely they will want to jump on the grant wagon and help.”
The total projected cost of the library is 1.13 million. The Library Guild has raised $320,000.
The money promised by the city will remain in a reserve account and if the library project does not proceed as planned or another building project arises, the council can repeal this resolution and use the funds for something else. This would likely result in the loss of any grant funds, if any have been acquired.

Comments (0)

P1040906

The fabric of success

Posted on 18 September 2012 by admin

photo by Gini Bramlett
Various color-coordinated display areas offer creative ideas for any decorating project. Add to that shelves and shelves that run from ceiling to floor offer thousands of colorful remnants to choose from.

By Sayde Moser
For The Tribune

JUNCTION CITY – It has been called one of the best-kept secrets in Lane County, but according to Remains of the Day owners Jeff and Julie Greenwald, more and more people are realizing what their shop has to offer. In fact, they get shoppers from as far away as Roseburg and Florence.
Upon entering the quaint shop, located on 6th Street in historic downtown Junction City, the senses are instantly filled with colorful, vintage collectables, creatively displayed so as not to overwhelm the shopper.
Originally, the storefront was required by the city, but the Greenwald’s main business, Interior Creations, took up the rest of the 7,500-square-feet, where they manufactured anything from throw pillows to couches for interior designers and the booming motor coach industry.
When the motor coach industry started to falter, the Greenwald‘s knew they had to rethink their business structure in order to survive.
“Monaco actually left a year before the economy went bad, so we knew we had to venture into something else,” said Jeff.
Fortunately for Jeff and Julie, they had the foresight during the many years of manufacturing to save all the ‘scrap’ fabric they didn’t use.
“Our main focus has always been to recycle as much as we can,” Jeff said. “So we saved all the cut-offs back then because we had the intent of someday opening a store, it just came a lot sooner than we had expected.”
And so came the name ‘Remains of the Day,’ as the various colors and sizes of fabrics, neatly folded, color coordinated and stacked along each wall, are the remains of years of hard work. Each unique piece of fabric is one-of-a-kind.
“Remains of the Day means remnants,” Jeff said. “So once it’s gone it’s gone.”
Along with what they saved themselves, Jeff and Julie bought the remaining fabric from the passing of the motor coach industry at reduced cost, which means they can offer it to the public at low cost.
With thousands of yards of remnants, rolls of fabric and trims available in every shade and color, there is something to suite every decorative fancy.
“It’s amazing how many people we get coming through our doors who just are amazed at the amount of fabric we have. I am really happy with the way it’s been going,” said Jeff.
If on the off-chance you can’t find what you are looking for in the store, they offer a design center with books you can order from, as well as great ideas and pictures to help get the creative juices flowing. There are also supplies for sale and Jeff and Julie often consult with costumers to help them with their project.
“Even if they don’t buy anything from me, I want to take the time to help them however I can,” Jeff stated. “If I don’t have what they need, I will tell them where to go to get it, because satisfied customers will come back.”
They even offer a quilting machine people can rent. Eventually the Greenwald‘s will rent tables and other equipment, so people will have a place they can go to complete a project.
“We like to try different things; we are always changing. Five years ago we were doing something completely different, and who knows what we will be doing in another five years. We like to keep it new and interesting for people, as well as helpful.”
Remains of the Day is located at 177 W. 6th Ave. in Junction City. Their hours are Monday-Friday from 9am-4:30pm, and Saturday from 10am-4pm, or call 541.998.6623 for more information.

Comments (0)

MN 09.19.12 Century Ride pic

More than a bike ride

Posted on 18 September 2012 by admin

photo by Gini Bramlett
Riders were treated to a vegetarian dinner after biking 100 miles through the countryside for the Farm to Farm Century Ride benefitting the Monroe Sharing Garden. Riders came from all around the Northwest for the event.

MONROE – Cyclists from around the Northwest rode 100 miles visiting organic farms and learning about sustainability
On Saturday, more than 150 bike riders participated in the Willamette Valley Farm to Farm Century Ride beginning at the Methodist Church in Monroe. A fundraiser for the Monroe Sharing Gardens, riders were treated to a all natural breakfast of bagels, porridge and fresh fruit and a bountiful vegetarian dinner at the ride’s end which included homemade chili and cornbread, corn on the cob, scratch-made hummus-basil stuffed tomatoes, freshly picked salad greens with veggies and pie and ice cream, most of which was harvested from the Monroe Sharing Gardens located right behind the Methodist Church. Riders were encouraged to visit the gardens.
Participants rode 100 miles through the area’s back country roads discovering local farms along the way, four of which were armed and ready to host the cyclists offering beverages, locally-grown fresh fruits and vegetables, fresh-baked oatmeal cookies, sunflower seeds, homemade potato doughnuts, sandwiches and much more.
The first stop on the tour was at Hope Grange off Alsea-Deadwood Hwy. hosted by Leaping Lamb Farmstay. Gathering Together Farm off Hwy 34 was next. Then the cyclists continued on to Horse Creek Farm on Peoria Road. The last stop before completing the loop was Groundworks Organics off River Road.
The Monroe Sharing Gardens is one large plot shared by all instead of many separate plots rented by individuals. All materials and labor are donated, and the food that is grown is shared amongst those who have need, whether or not they have contributed time, materials or labor. All surplus is donated to local food banks and other charities. No one is ever charged money for the food that is grown.
To learn more about the Sharing Gardens or to make a direct contribution, visit
alpinegarden.blogspot.com.

Comments (0)

SKMBT_C35312091714310

Julius Richard Schmidt

Posted on 18 September 2012 by admin


Submitted by the family of Julius Schmidt.

Aug. 5, 1998 – Sept. 14, 2012
A memorial service will be held at Laurel Park in Junction City from 11am-3pm, Saturday, Sept. 22. The service is open to the public.
Julius Richard Schmidt was born Aug. 5, 1998 to Michael and Rosanna in Eugene. He joined an older brother, Roman to complete the family. Julius died Sept. 14 in a train accident in Junction City.
He lived in Cheshire with his mother, brother, Uncle Matthew Logan and grandparents Ben and Jeannie Logan. He was an 8th grader at Oaklea Middle. At age 3, Julius saw the Spiderman move and loved it so much he wore a Spiderman costume for five years.
He loved art, drawing, animals and was an avid 4-wheeler bobsledder. At age 11 his uncle Stephen Klemmer gave him his first skate board. That same year he entered his first skate competition.
Skate boarding was his passion. His favorite pro-boarder was Torey Pudwill and his favorite local boarder was Justin James of Tactics Skateboard shop.
This summer he was lucky enough to go to skateboard camp with Justin and other from the River House. He skated throughout Oregon and Washington. He said that it was the best summer of his life. Skating, hanging out with his friends, laughing with his family and listening to Bob Marley were his favorite things to do.
He is survived by his mother and brother Roman of Cheshire, his father; Michael Schmidt of Salem, stepfather; Richard Greene of Hilo, HI, grandparents; Ben and Jeannie Logan of Cheshire, uncle; Matt Logan of Cheshire, aunt and uncle and cousin; Rachel, Stephen and Elijah Klemmer of Eugene; great grandmother; Toni Hendrickson of Houston, TX, grandparents; Claude and Nora Smith of Eugene, uncle, aunt and cousins; Zeke, Sara, Micha, Jarin and Hannah Schmidt of Eugene, aunt, uncle and cousins; Chay, Tracy, Dustyn and Deuce Schmidt of Oakdale, CA.

Comments (0)

Don’t do crime in our town

Posted on 18 September 2012 by admin

By Steve Rowland

Our recent showing of names and mug shots of people who have been arrested in Junction City has been met with overwhelming positive comments from the residents of our community. The comments ranged from:
· “Even the DUI is criminal; that person has the potential to kill innocent people, and they often do.”
· “When someone steals, they take by invading my sanctity, and they can never replace what they took.”
· “With these photos, I’ll recognize when someone is scouting my area . . . to make me their next victim.”
· “These are people that haven’t learned what’s mine is not theirs.”
· “I don’t want these people near my daughter or son.”
· “If they don’t want the shame, then they shouldn’t do things that give them the blame.”
· “If I don’t want my picture in the paper, I’d better not do a crime in this town.”
And so on . . .
This newspaper is not the only paper to show mug shots. We show these mug shots for the purpose of public safety. Many of the people shown have a rap sheet that would shock most of us into spending thousands on security systems.
Some of the people shown might be first time offenders, and we hope that they will be embarrassed enough to not offend a second time. If anyone thinks this to be too harsh – the prevailing thought is – then don’t do the crime in our town.

Comments (0)

Meth, a monster with many names

Meth, a monster with many names

Posted on 18 September 2012 by admin

Speed, Ice, Chalk, Crank, Fire, Glass, Crystal
By Steve Rowland
Tribune Publisher
I remember when we complained that our Oregon government was being too restrictive when they passed a law on the sale of ephedrine and pseudoephedrine, two of the most common ingredients in cold medicines. HB 2485 was made into law in Sept. 2006; since then, only Mississippi has followed suit. The chatter around town in 2006 was that this was ineffective and would do little to curb the manufacture of methamphetamine and its users, and that we would have to suffer with colds. Strangely, it depends on how you look at numbers and their sources.
A 2010 Oregon State Police (OSP) Medical Examiner Department report states methamphetamine-related deaths in the state of Oregon were at 106 while heroin was at 90 and cocaine at 20, and 18 people died from using the drugs in combination.
The report lists Lane County with two heroin and 14 meth deaths; Linn with one cocaine and seven meth and one combined drug death; and Benton with one heroin and two meth deaths. These statistics seem small; but please read on, and don’t be distracted by HB 2485.
A May 2011 article by Maxine Bernstein of the Oregonian, quoted the then Lincoln County District Attorney Rob Bovett as saying, “Since Mexico banned pseudoephedrine five years ago, and due to the rigid Oregon restrictions, the bulk of meth production has moved to California, Arizona, Nevada and Washington. The drug organizations are paying people in these states to purchase pseudoephedrine products in quantities below legal thresholds from retail stores.”
A February 2012 report by Chris Stomberg and Arun Sharma of the Cascade Policy Institute, a research center of Oregon, questions the effectiveness of HB 2485. They cite numbers that indicate the decline from 467 meth lab incidents in 2004 to 12 in 2010 are the result of other factors because our neighboring states also declined similarly. “The exact mechanism behind this shared decline is not known, but would appear to reflect technological or market changes unrelated to the Oregon law. As a result, Oregonian’s pay more for cold medication.”
The Stomberg/Sharma report says there was a 23 percent decline in meth use nationally during the years 2006-2009, yet they note that ‘Oregon state law enforcement personnel indicate meth use to be Oregon’s greatest drug threat.’
So, who do you believe? Maybe both? Was the ephedrine law meaningful? What is important?
It is now 2012. Are we to deduct that less meth houses blowing up mean less meth use? Are we to assume that meth users don’t hurt anyone but themselves?
One thing is certain. A lot of people are affected by manufacture and sales, and meth use, along with the meth user is their family and then their immediate neighborhoods and communities. Meth is said to be tied to almost every property and identity theft crime in Oregon.
State Medical Examiner Dr. Karen Gunson was quoted by Berstein as saying, ‘. . . it‘s not too hard to jump off buildings or drive crazy while you‘re on meth.”
Here are some facts from a Wasco, OR publication:
· Meth use among Oregon females 17 and under has increased by 57 percent over the past five years.
· Addiction rate is said to be 99 percent for first-time users; and the life expectancy of a habitual user is five years.
· 73 percent of Wasco County child abuse cases are meth-related.
· Five pounds of toxic waste is produced in the manufacture of every one pound of meth.
Deputy Bret King of Multnomah County Sheriff’s Office has a project called the ‘Faces of Meth.’ He starts each of his presentations by saying, “I thank the men and women who, through their stories and photos, can share their experience with methamphetamine so you never have to try it yourself to know what it can do. I have seen and interviewed each of these people in jail. I hope that in seeing this you will make choices to not use methamphetamine and that I will never see you come inside my jail.”

Comments (0)

jc football

Junction City nips Taft

Posted on 17 September 2012 by admin

JUNCTION CITY – Friday’s non-league match, Junction City Tigers scored a close 27-24 victory over the Taft Tigers. In their next game, the Junction City Tigers clash with the North Marion Huskies in a non-league match on Friday. Junction City will attempt to move on its 2-1 season record.

Comments (0)

photo2

Artifacts discovered on JC police department property

Posted on 11 September 2012 by admin

A sink hole in the parking lot containing various antique items may offer some history

By Sayde Moser
For The Tribune
JUNCTION CITY – Bob Biswell with the Junction City Historical Society got a call recently from Police Chief Mark Chase. The parking lot behind the police department had developed somewhat of a sinkhole and as public works was digging it up, they found some antique liquor bottles and other interesting finds.
One of the bottles, a flask-style liquor bottle, was designed during the civil war as a flatter, more narrow bottle for soldiers to carry on their person. These bottles were popular into the 1900s, but that doesn’t necessarily mean that Bob and other history buffs can quit pinning down how they came to be under the police department parking lot.
“There are really two options we could be looking at,” Bob said. “And we may never know exactly how they got there because we are still learning about this stuff.”
One possibility for how the artifacts ended up buried underground involves the old opera house that burned down in 1915. The massive opera house would have had a storage area that sat roughly where the police department now sits on Greenwood Street. When the building burned down, it is possible that during the cleanup phase a bunch of items just got buried and covered up with dirt. According to Bob, public works also found some charred wood in the sinkhole but according to Bob it would be difficult to prove that came from the opera house.
The other possibility was a few decades later in 1949, when former mayor Tom Nelson encouraged Junction City residents to hook up to the brand new sanitary sewer system and abandon their septic tanks. According to an old newspaper article, he asked residents to fill their septic tanks with dry trash and rubbish and then fill it with dirt. The liquor bottles, while older than 1949, could have been some of that rubbish sitting around someone’s house that they used to fill their septic tank.
“We can’t know more than we know,” said Bob. “And we only know enough to know that there is a lot that we don’t know.”
Other things pulled from the hole include an automobile rim similar to those used in the 1920s, a sign and possibly a piece to a bell tower. Bob hasn’t been able to go through all the artifacts yet, but he plans to.
“We don’t know if we will find something that can pinpoint exactly where these things came from, but we plan to learn everything we can; I don’t know if we will know anything conclusive even after studying it, but we will have some clues,” he said. “We are having fun trying to learn and understand this stuff and seeing what went on in our town before our present time. We will never have the whole story but we feel anything we can do to enhance people’s knowledge of Junction City is a benefit.”

Comments (0)

school days

Quiet Dignity…

Posted on 11 September 2012 by admin

Tonya Kropf

Stories and photo by Bill Kunkle
Our children headed off to schools this month to begin an important aspect of their future and to our nation’s well being.
Many entered large buildings with hundreds of students. But some entered little, rural one or two room schools as well.
There is one such school in our area; Lake Creek School a few miles north of Harrisburg on Peoria Road. It is in an area of clean, well-kept farms where quiet dignity stretches as far as the eye can see.
The sound of stillness is interupted by the wind stirring a rustle of cottonwood trees or the soft, melancholy cooing of the turtle dove. It is populated by a people who enjoy vigerous open air, hard work and a rather quiet, simple life. Nature at it’s best!
The school has only 10 students and two teachers. While big, block-long schools get the most attention, Lake Creek is just as important.

Comments (0)

Wetlands continue to delay Urban Growth Boundary

Posted on 11 September 2012 by admin

While some think the approved Local Wetland Inventory should be redacted and the process restarted, others wish to move forward and not delay another year

by Sayde Moser
for The Tribune
JUNCTION CITY – “We the people don’t want wetlands” seemed to be the slogan of last week’s city council meeting and attendees even chanted the phrase for a brief moment during a public hearing on the Urban Growth Boundary (UGB).
Several gave public testimony asking, and in some cases begging, the council not to accept the planning commission’s recommendation on wetland regulations, which is tucked inside the UGB.
The recommended wetlands regulations had been slightly altered to remove the 20-foot overlay from the edges of the wetland, with exceptions in three specific properties.
“Everything that is currently being done on your property can still happen,” said City Administrator Kevin Watson. “Properties can still keep up fences, sheds and still maintain their gardens. This isn’t a city taking anything; this is just a requirement by the state for us to show how we will protect these environmental areas.”
But public testimony seemed to be in favor of holding off on passing the UGB until the wetlands issue was more thoroughly understood.
Gary Crum recommended the city ask Department of State Lands to retract their approval of the Local Wetlands Inventory and start the process over again, giving the public input requirement its due course, which he believes it did not get the first time around.
Lou Hanavan, who has an easement through his property for man-made drainage ditches put in by the city in the 1960s, hired a wetlands expert to do soil sampling on his property. The results concluded that there were in fact no wetlands in the water-way. He has also collected 200 signatures opposing the wetlands Wetlands continue to delay Urban Growth Boundary
While some think the approved Local Wetland Inventory should be redacted and the process restarted, others wish to move forward and not delay another year
by Sayde Moser
for The Tribune
JUNCTION CITY – “We the people don’t want wetlands” seemed to be the slogan of last week’s city council meeting and attendees even chanted the phrase for a brief moment during a public hearing on the Urban Growth Boundary (UGB).
Several gave public testimony asking, and in some cases begging, the council not to accept the planning commission’s recommendation on wetland regulations, which is tucked inside the UGB.
The recommended wetlands regulations had been slightly altered to remove the 20-foot overlay from the edges of the wetland, with exceptions in three specific properties.
“Everything that is currently being done on your property can still happen,” said City Administrator Kevin Watson. “Properties can still keep up fences, sheds and still maintain their gardens. This isn’t a city taking anything; this is just a requirement by the state for us to show how we will protect these environmental areas.”
But public testimony seemed to be in favor of holding off on passing the UGB until the wetlands issue was more thoroughly understood.
Gary Crum recommended the city ask Department of State Lands to retract their approval of the Local Wetlands Inventory and start the process over again, giving the public input requirement its due course, which he believes it did not get the first time around.
Lou Hanavan, who has an easement through his property for man-made drainage ditches put in by the city in the 1960s, hired a wetlands expert to do soil sampling on his property. The results concluded that there were in fact no wetlands in the water-way. He has also collected 200 signatures opposing the wetlands classifications of these drainage ditches.
“We have worked awfully hard to take care of the property owners,” disputed Jeff Haag, a member of the planning commission. “The planning commission did not create these wetlands out of thin air. We were handed them and we went out of our way to remove the overlay around the ditches. Personally I would like to see this move forward.”
He added that if removing the drainage ditches from the LWI was something that could be done easily without a significant delay to the UGB, he would be all for it. “But if this ends up taking two or three more year I am not interested in that at all,” he said. “You already can’t build or do much of anything with the drainage ditch easement that runs through your property, so calling it a wetland doesn’t really change much of anything.”
Anna Buckley, the Wetlands Program Manager for DSL confirmed that even if the ditch isn’t a wetland, if it is still a natural waterway it is protected under state statute. Even though the ditches are man-made, they are allegedly a natural water-way that was enhanced for city purposes.
Bill DiMarco asked Buckley and Bill Ryan, the assistant director for DSL what the process would be of withdrawing the LWI and starting over.
“The scientific information wouldn’t change,” answered Buckley. “If you felt like you wanted more public process, that is another issue. Based on my review though, it looked like there was adequate opportunity for public comment and yours was not unusual to any other public review process. “
“Redacting the approval of the LWI would be new territory to us,” added Ryan. “We have never had someone want to remove the approval, but we certainly have amendments to the inventory so there is a process for doing that. You can reopen it, get new information and we would be happy to look at that.”
Ryan clarified that amending the LWI would take up to another year.
“We are comfortable with our approval on that LWI,” he said. “If there is a request to amend it, it needs to come with field data to support that amendment. We have never had a jurisdiction ask us to resend our approval; I don’t know that that is impossible or not, but we haven’t come across that before.”
DiMarco implied that the LWI was sent to DSL by a city staff member without permission or authorization from the city council
“I think it is obvious we screwed up,” he said. “Something went wrong and I don’t want to hold this up but I don’t agree that these designations are inevitable no matter what.”
“This process allows for refinement after it’s adopted,” Haag specified, adding that the UGB is too important to Junction City to let it get snagged on wetlands regulations for another year.
The council agreed to accept written testimony on the UGB and LWI for another week before deciding to whether to move forward with it or not.

Comments (0)

library

Passing the buck

Posted on 11 September 2012 by admin

Monroe City Council needing to address who pays SDCs for new library building

by Sayde Moser
for The Tribune
MONROE – The city council still has yet to come to a determination on whether they will be waiving or paying the System Development Charges (SDCs) for the new library, which started construction a few months ago. South Benton Enhancement Committee member Roger Irvin had previously asked the city to waive the fees.
The total bill for water, sewer, storm drainage and street charges for the library would be $62,367.
City Manager Jim Minard suggested the council address upfront whether it wanted to waive the fees or reduce them, so everyone could plan accordingly. The council has the ability to reduce the fees if it so desires, but cannot raise them.
Mayor Frank Thayer suggested working with the library board and at least reducing the fees to show the city’s support for the project.
“The library is for the community and it is the only thing our children have to keep them occupied,” he said.
Councilor Carol McGlasson disagreed, stating, “This is a South Benton library. This is not the Monroe library.” She added that she felt the city should not waive the SDCs. “If we waive the transportation fees or any portion of this, it sets a precedent.”
“It would be morally and ethically wrong to waive these or any fees when we just went to the public and told them we are hiking up their water bill,” agreed Councilor Brandy Rainy. “Every time a fee is waived, it places an ongoing burden on present and future residents.”
The SDCs are based on what is called an equivalent dwelling unit, which sets a minimum standard for each SDC. For uses that exceed these standards, the fee is adjusted.
For water service, the library would be charged $7,152.53. For sanitary sewer, which is based on the number of plumbing fixtures in the facility and multiplied by three, the library would be looking at a $14,433.65 charge. The storm water SDC is based on the square footage of the property, totaling $8,363.13 in SDC fees. The transportation SDC equals $30,018.64, which is a little more than seven times that of an equivalent dwelling unit. The transportation SDC provides for street upgrades that improve traffic throughout the city.
The council agreed to set up a meeting with the South Benton Community Enhancement group and discuss the matter of SDCs, as well as what the city’s responsibility will be once the building is completed. There has been talk that the building will be turned over to the city, but the council still feels it is a gray area.
Minard said that other cities like Alsea, Philomath and Corvallis have an agreement with the county and an understanding that the library district operates the library – provides computers, material and labor – and the city is responsible for the maintenance of the building and grounds and water and sewer bills.
“You have kind of gone on record that we understood this is what they do elsewhere and this is what the city will consider doing as well,” he told the council. “They expect us to take over once the library becomes operational which is why we have $6,000 more in the budget for those utilities.”
Under federal grant requirements, the city will not be allowed to change the usage of the building for the next five years.

Comments (0)

Teen killed by train over weekend

Teen killed by train over weekend

Posted on 11 September 2012 by admin

Julius Schmidt was tragically struck by the Amtrak on Saturday while playing with friends – Police urge everyone to use extreme caution around the train tracks

By Sayde Moser
For The Tribune
JUNCTION CITY – A steady line of mourners could be found on Front Street Sunday, leaving flowers and saying prayers for the family of Julius Schmidt who was hit and killed by the Amtrak train Saturday night.
The accident, which happened at approximately 8:30pm on Sept. 8, was between 4th and 6th Avenues – nearly the same spot where John Muller was killed two years ago on Aug. 10.
Two witnesses who were with Julius, 14, that night said they were on the tracks trying to outrun the train. According to Police Chief Mark Chase, the two witnesses said Julius had reportedly been known to run in front of the train on Holly Street, although that has not been confirmed.
All three teens were on the tracks running away from the train, reported the train conductor.  The conductor of the southbound Amtrak sounded his horn and locked the brakes at 6th Avenue but didn’t come to a complete stop until the train was past 1st. The other two were able to jump out of the way.
“They were reportedly running along the tracks and intended to jump off in the air as the train goes by and get a rush,” Chase said. He added that the witnesses said Julius had done it before, but they had not.
The scene was closed down for approximately three hours as officers re-constructed the accident, interviewed witnesses and Amtrak personnel. Junction City Police along with the Oregon State Police, Union Pacific Railroad Police and the Lane County Medical examiner’s office responded.
Officers determined there were no signs of impairment of the train engineer operating the train at the time of the accident.
“The train tracks are not something anyone should be on at any point in time,” Chase said, adding that at 76-77 miles per hour the train can be upon you very quickly. “Hopefully other kids will realize this is very serious and they should avoid this type of behavior.  This is a stark reality of what can happen.”
Grief councilors were available at Oaklea School on Monday for students who needed help coping with the tragedy and Chase has been collaborating with Principal Brian Young to bring Operation Life Saver to the schools.
Operation Life Saver is a train prevention program which talks about train safety and what the dangers are. According to the program, a person or vehicle is struck by a train every three hours in the united states. It offers safety tips and the consequences of walking on the tracks. To learn more visit www.oli.org.

Comments (0)

Advertise Here

Advertise Here