Archive | October, 2012

Called to serve

Posted on 31 October 2012 by admin

Risking her life more than once, Joyce Beck was called to teach people about God in Ghana

By Gini Bramlett
For the Tribune

JUNCTION CITY – Everyone has a story. Any journalist will tell you that. You just have to ask the right questions and most people will tell you things that might surprise you. And, Joyce Beck, a volunteer at Viking Sal Senior Center in Junction City who will be 80 is March, has one that might astound.
Joyce spent several years in Ghana, Africa as a missionary. That in itself isn’t so amazing, since most of us know dedicated people who have spent years as missionaries around the world with various organizations and churches. Joyce’s story is a little different.
She was called by the voice of God, but she refused to listen.
Joyce says she hesitates to tell people this since she thinks people will believe she is crazy, but Joyce says she did hear His voice back in the early 80s telling her to go to Africa. And, she argued with Him for a long time.
“I had reservations,” she said. She had just completed Bible School. It took her a year to decide.
Shortly after arriving in Africa, she was robbed. She was left with $60.
“I stayed two years and never had need of anything,” said Joyce. “God supplied everything.” She had just one dime left to call her daughter to pick her up at the airport when she got home.
She also had everything she when she got home.
She also had everything she owned stolen at one point, so she wore native garments during her stay. When she returned home, she went to schools displaying some of the clothing and gifts she’d received.
While in Ghana, she went from village to village teaching people about the Lord, staying in homes of the people and ultimately immersing herself in their culture and learning their languages. She also taught young children in nursery schools. At the church, she answered letters for people and prayed for them.
“I learned the languages by singing their songs. I’d win them over and they’d really listen to me.”
“They’d bring me big plates of food,” Joyce said. “They’d bring sick babies and I’d pray over them and they’d get well. The people there practiced voodoo and were used to giving something in return, so she’d ask for a glass of water.
“I’d stick my finger in it and touch their babies. I was really praying, but they were used to voodoo doctors who would ask them for something.”
While being there was an amazing experience for her, there were times when her very life was at stake. At one point she contracted cholera and was deathly ill. Another time gangs had a turf war where she rented a house from the church.
“Unfortunately, I wasn’t home or they would have killed me,” said Joyce. “I could have been killed I don’t know how many times. I’ve lost count, but my heavenly Father took care of me.”
She said that in spite of having no experience preaching in front of people, she was put in the position to do just that often.
“I wouldn’t know what to say,” said Joyce. “But the Lord would tell me what to say.” She was asked to preach to a group at a gathering of churches at a beach where more than 10,000 people were baptized.
In all, Joyce had two trips to Africa staying a total of about three years. She still has African friends who contact her. Some have even come to visit her.
Joyce will be 80 years old in March. She can no longer help in kitchen at Viking Sal preparing lunches like she used to. She’s served on the Viking Sal Advisory Board and has served as a senior companion in Eugene.
Now, she thinks it may be about time to leave Junction City and live near her youngest son in Idaho. But for now, three times a week Joyce still has lunch at Viking Sal with friends.
She says she doesn’t regret a minute of her experiences in Africa telling people about the Lord, even though at times, she’d risked her life.
“I wouldn’t trade that now for anything.”

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bus

Going mobile

Posted on 31 October 2012 by admin

Harrisburg seeks input about a possible shuttle service to JC

By Vera Westbrook
For the Tribune

HARRISBURG – The City of Harrisburg invites the public, including Junction City residents, to participate in a survey on the city’s website to determine whether local interest exists in a shuttle service between Harrisburg and Junction City. This survey is the first step in addressing a transportation need for Harrisburg residents.
“That need has to do with providing transportation services to persons who don’t have the ability to get around themselves,” Harrisburg City Administrator Bruce Cleaton said, or for those who prefer to take the bus rather than pay for gas to drive to Eugene or Springfield. Lane Transit District (LTD) buses stop in JC every day except Sunday.
“Our main intent in trying to get the word out via the Tribune is to make people in JC aware of the survey,” Cleaton said, targeting those who may feel the need to get back and forth between the two towns.
During discussions with city staff, LTD indicated no intention of extending bus service to Harrisburg at this time. Instead, LTD suggested that the city provide a shuttle service linking Harrisburg to LTD buses in Junction City.
The proposed shuttle route would follow a loop through the city that would allow riders to get on or off at the following streets: LaSalle, Priceboro, 9th St., Diamond Hill, 7th St., Territorial and 2nd  St. The shuttle would time trips between Harrisburg and Junction City to coordinate with LTD buses.
This survey aims to determine if a need for a shuttle service between the two cities exists. If the need exists, the city can then seek funding sources to support the shuttle. Through survey interest, the city could also estimate the number of shuttle riders who could contribute revenue to pay for all or most of the service.
Although the survey may yield unfavorable results, it will help determine if the service is needed and if the city can make it happen.
Harrisburg residents will receive the survey in the mail with their utility bill at the end of October. The survey can also be accessed from a link on the city website online at www.ci.harrisburg.or.us. Cleaton urges all local residents with transportation interest to complete the survey.
For more information or for a copy of the survey, call Harrisburg City Hall at 541.995.6655, or simply print a copy of the survey off the Internet and mail it to the City of Harrisburg, PO Box 378, Harrisburg, OR, 97446, or fax it to 541.995.9244.
“The shuttle would be something of mutual benefit if we could make it happen,” Cleaton said.

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Skate Park – skater

Officially Open

Posted on 31 October 2012 by admin

By Kyle Krenik
The Tribune News

JUNCTION CITY – The Junction City Skate Park represents a 13+ year community-wide dream for youth to recreate in a positive and safe environment. The 1,500 square foot park offers street style and ramp based skateboard opportunities for all skill levels.
On Saturday Junction City Mayor David Brunscheon Helped cut the ribon marking the offical opening of The Junction City Skate Park.
In a few weeks a park bench will be installed  near the skate park and will be dedicated to Julius Schmidt, an avid skateboarder who was hit and killed by a train last month.

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Should we ignore or do something?

Should we ignore or do something?

Posted on 31 October 2012 by admin

This past Wednesday, a woman tells a local store owner that she saw two men dressed in black, checking the doors on his store in the early morning hours. She asked the store owner, “Should I have called the police?”
Where has all the common sense gone? Are we afflicted with a virus of apathy?
At The Tribune News we have been asking for involvement from our local high schools for about two years now, and no matter on what level we ask—top, bottom or middle—we get no positive action.
We’ve tried to get this message to the schools but we hadn’t succeeded in getting anyone’s ear until a parent sent an email copy of our frustration to a teacher.
Here’s what the teacher/advisor wrote to us, “If you [The Tribune News] would like high school journalists to help you, then I suggest you take an ad in our school publication, or put your query in to the student announcements.” ??
Whatever happened to a school taking an opportunity to work with a local business for the benefit of the students and the school overall? Am I to understand that the school is run by students and not the guiding wisdom of teachers/administration?
We offer an opportunity for students, many of whom should be encouraged by the school, to participate and get published with an additional venue to their school newspaper. This is an opportunity for a student to get ‘clips’ that they can add to their resume. This is their opportunity to work ‘in the real world’ and increase literary skills, especially if they would like to pursue a career that involves any type of writing. The Tribune News is offering them space that we pay for—to enhance their education and to inform their community.
I ask the schools, “Isn’t a happy community, a community that sees education working outside the bricks more likely to vote positive on tax increases?” I sincerely believe that people pay for value, especially when they understand it.
For parents who want more information about schools and school activities and school sports we ask you to consider the action of the above parent who did get a response. That parent needs your help to work for positive change to get students involved in a real world environment. The Tribune News is offering, at its expense, a venue for our students that is beneficial to them and their community.
Perhaps if more parents would get involved we could bring the schools back into our local paper. This is your newspaper. You, the parent, the reader, can shape its course.

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Taylor

Goodbye Junction City – Hello Ecuador!

Posted on 31 October 2012 by admin

photo by Michelle Long

In a meeting with The Tribune News, Mr. Taylor, the operator, for Love In The Air Llc. announced his intentions to liquidate and close the company.  Mr. Taylor stated they have had a great couple of years in Junction City, but it was time to move to the next phase of their business plan.
The company next phase is to move to Ecuador and convert to a U.S. nonprofit organization, dedicated to funding small local U.S. charities and fraternal organizations who have specific programs serving our core groups, i.e. children, women, senior citizen and U.S. Military personnel and their families.
As an example, Mr. Taylor named several local organizations in Junction City, which would qualify in the future. His list included, J.C. Lions vision eye care program, Education Together Foundation and Local Aid. Mr. Taylor stated they were starting their liquidation sale Oct. 31. When asked why liquidate before two major holidays, Mr. Taylor said they still wanted to give back to the community and this was the best way.  He also said that all the jewelry would be 50 percent off and the Alpaca and Llama apparel would be discounted 30 percent.
Anybody who has shopped at Love In The Air, know they already have the lowest prices in the valley. Mr. Taylor stated everything would be sold; tables, displays and miscellaneous office items.
Mr. Taylor also wanted to thank The Tribune News and Steve Rowland for all the support in making Love In The Air Llc. possible. All the people at the Tribune News have been wonderful, and the business could not have had any better group of people to share our space.
Mr. Taylor would like to thank all the people who have supported his efforts by purchasing jewelry and Alpaca apparel – they have been fantastic!

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tooth

H.A.R.T. hosts mobile dental van

Posted on 31 October 2012 by admin

HARRISBURG – On Nov. 5 H.A.R.T. will sponsor a free dental clinic for low income individuals in the Harrisburg area. To qualify individuals need to have no insurance, no means to pay for dental care and are not eligible for OHP. Also, this dental clinic is for those with visible decay or in pain, not for routine check-ups or cleanings. Though the Tri-County area is served, preference is given to children and Harrisburg residents.
Medical Teams International, www.medicalteams.org/ is always in need of donations. Contact the H.A.R.T. Center at 541.995.7700 for an appointment or to donate.
For more information about this or our other programs and services visit www.hartfamilyresourcecenter.org

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Wetland

Wetland issue moves up the ladder

Posted on 31 October 2012 by admin

Local landowners continue to the county level to be heard

photo by Kyle Krenik
About 120 property owners with canals running through their land in Junction City don’t agree with additional regulations added to already state-protected waterways. The Central Canal off Oak St. is one of the three canals. Local residents plan to take the matter before the Lane County Board of Commissioners at a Dec. 4 meeting.

By Vera Westbrook
For the Tribune
JUNCTION CITY – ‘You can’t please anybody sometimes,’ is a befitting slogan for Junction City after the city council recently approved new regulations governing three ditches running through town: the Eastern, Western and Central canals.
These canals were designated low priority wetlands in a local wetland inventory that was required by the state as part of JC’s 20- year Comprehensive Plan, a document that must be co-adopted by the county and approved by the state for future development to occur around town.
Although the state doesn’t require that low priority wetlands be locally regulated, the city‘s planning staff recommended wetland regulations to the planning commission and the city council.  Property owner ‘GMH’ Hanavan said she hasn’t been able to get a satisfactory answer as to why the city needed the new regulations.
Most of the private property owners who own the land through which the canals run don’t like the city’s
decision to add what they feel are unnecessary local wetland regulations in addition to already sufficient state regulation of the canals.  They also disagree with the designation of the canals as wetlands.
Hanavan interpreted the new regulations as allowing pre-existing improvements to remain in and/or near the wetland designated areas, while requiring property owners to comply with the new wetland regulations for future improvements.
“Before, we always had the right to make an application to the state to put a culvert in the ditch for the water to run through; we could have filled over a culvert so we could walk across it, have a lawn or plant a garden over it,” Hanavan said. “Under these new regulations, people could never have a culvert, as the canals would always have to remain as
open waterways.”
Petitions with more than 200 signatures were submitted to the planning commission objecting to the new wetland regulations prior to the final city council vote that rejected making any changes. Landowners are now taking the matter a step further.
“We don’t want these regulations on our private land,” Hanavan said.  “The city wouldn’t listen to us, so we are now asking the county commissioners to listen to us.”
Hanavan and other property owners are sending letters to the Lane County Planning Commission and the Board of Lane County Commissioners. They are also preparing testimony to bring before the county commissioners at a public hearing scheduled for Dec. 4. If the county won’t listen, the landowners are ready to mount their campaign at the state level.
To hear what city staff and city officials have to say about the subject, be sure to follow the continuation of this story in next week’s issue of the Tribune News.

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Bungling burglar cuffed by JCPD

Bungling burglar cuffed by JCPD

Posted on 31 October 2012 by admin

Thief gets hand caught in the candy jar

photo by Kyle Krenik
Evidence of stolen items from local burglaries recoverd from 952 Holly St. Junction City.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

photo provided By Lane County Jail
Jason Michael Donaldson Acourding to Information from the Lane County Jail website (http://e-airs.org/eAirsInternet/) Donaldson has at least 13 alias’s

By Steve Rowland
For the Tribune

JUNCTION CITY – Wednesday evening Junction City Police Department arrested Jason Michael Donaldson at 952 Holly St., for violation of probation. During the arrest, officers noticed a candy jar and a few other items that fit the descriptions of items that had been taken from a recent B&I Hardware store burglary. Donaldson got a free ride to the Lane County jail.
Officer Nicol and Officer Markell worked through the night and called the District Attorney on Thursday morning and a search warrant was issued. JCPD officers soon found other items from other burglaries, and charged the suspect with additional crimes.
During an interview at the scene, JCPD Chief Mark Chase said, “We received some information, so obviously we had probable cause to believe, based upon earlier contact at this residence, that there was some stolen items in the house. There’s probably a couple of dozen bags in the house that they are [officers] loading up of stolen stuff. I give credit to Officer Nicol and Officer Markell who worked through the night.”
The story doesn’t end here. It is suspected that there could be more arrests to come. The JCPD is requesting that anyone who has seen Donaldson, or persons with Donaldson, to please call the JCPD at 541.998.1245. Again, the investigation is ongoing as there are additional suspects being considered and any information will be useful.
Regarding the work of his officers, Chief Chase said, “I’m really thrilled as to Officer Nicol and Markell and their keen police work that caught this suspect. Without their efforts this case could still be unsolved. We are very fortunate to have police officers like them that sincerely care about our community and are conscientious about doing the best job they can.”
Donaldson, who has at least 13 alias’s, is 36 years old. He was taken to the Lane County Jail the week of 10/7/12 by Sgt. Salisbury on another charge where he was booked and released due to the matrix system.
To protect yourself from Donaldson and similar criminals, be sure to attend one or both of the following meetings: The Junction City, Harrisburg & Monroe Chamber of Commerce is hosting a presentation by the JCPD on ‘Burglar-proofing your business/home.’ It will be held on Wednesday, Nov. 14, at the Chamber Networking Breakfast at 7am at the Moose Lodge in Junction City.
To avoid overcrowding, please RSVP by Nov.12. Call Chamber Dir. Rick Kissock at 541.998.6154, or email rick@jch-chamber.org.
Also, on Thursday, Nov. 15 at 6pm at the JC High School Cafeteria, the JCPD will have a city-wide Sector Mtg. (Sectors 1-5). Of course, all businesses and homeowners are welcome. No RSVP necessary.

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Screen shot 2012-10-28 at 12.10.17 AM

NWS WEST COAST/ALASKA TSUNAMI ADVISORY

Posted on 28 October 2012 by admin

The National Weather Service now says that a tsunami ADVISORY has been
 expanded to include northern California and southern Oregon. Bear in mind, 
this is an advisory, NOT a warning. An advisory means a tsunami capable of 
producing strong currents or waves dangerous to people near the water is expected.





PUBLIC TSUNAMI MESSAGE NUMBER 8
NWS WEST COAST/ALASKA TSUNAMI WARNING CENTER PALMER AK
1153 PM PDT SAT OCT 27 2012

THE ADVISORY REGIONS ARE KEPT THE SAME.
NEW OBSERVATIONS ARE ADDED BELOW

...THE TSUNAMI ADVISORY CONTINUES IN EFFECT FOR THE COASTAL
   AREAS OF CALIFORNIA AND OREGON FROM GUALALA POINT
   CALIFORNIA/LOCATED 80 MILES NW OF SAN FRANCISCO/ TO
   DOUGLAS-LANE COUNTY LINE OREGON/10 MILES SW OF FLORENCE/...

...THE TSUNAMI ADVISORY CONTINUES IN EFFECT FOR THE COASTAL
   AREAS OF BRITISH COLUMBIA AND ALASKA FROM THE
   WASHINGTON-BRITISH COLUMBIA BORDER TO CAPE DECISION
   ALASKA/LOCATED 85 MILES SE OF SITKA/...

...THIS MESSAGE IS INFORMATION ONLY FOR COASTAL AREAS OF
   CALIFORNIA FROM THE CALIFORNIA-MEXICO BORDER TO GUALALA
   POINT CALIFORNIA/LOCATED 80 MILES NW OF SAN FRANCISCO/...

...THIS MESSAGE IS INFORMATION ONLY FOR COASTAL AREAS OF
   OREGON AND WASHINGTON FROM DOUGLAS-LANE COUNTY LINE
   OREGON/10 MILES SW OF FLORENCE/ TO THE WASHINGTON-BRITISH
   COLUMBIA BORDER...

...THIS MESSAGE IS INFORMATION ONLY FOR COASTAL AREAS OF
   ALASKA FROM CAPE DECISION ALASKA/LOCATED 85 MILES SE OF
   SITKA/ TO ATTU ALASKA...

A TSUNAMI ADVISORY MEANS THAT A TSUNAMI CAPABLE OF PRODUCING
STRONG CURRENTS OR WAVES DANGEROUS TO PEOPLE IN OR VERY NEAR
THE WATER IS EXPECTED.  SIGNIFICANT WIDESPREAD INUNDATION
IS NOT EXPECTED FOR AREAS UNDER AN ADVISORY.  CURRENTS
MAY BE HAZARDOUS TO SWIMMERS... BOATS... AND COASTAL
STRUCTURES AND MAY CONTINUE FOR SEVERAL HOURS AFTER THE
INITIAL WAVE ARRIVAL.

AT 804 PM PACIFIC DAYLIGHT TIME ON OCTOBER 27 AN EARTHQUAKE WITH
PRELIMINARY MAGNITUDE 7.7 OCCURRED 25 MILES/40 KM SOUTH OF
SANDSPIT BRITISH COLUMBIA.
THIS EARTHQUAKE HAS GENERATED A TSUNAMI WHICH COULD CAUSE DAMAGE
TO REGIONS IN A WARNING OR ADVISORY.
ESTIMATED TSUNAMI ARRIVAL TIMES AND MAPS ALONG WITH SAFETY RULES
AND OTHER INFORMATION CAN BE FOUND ON THE WEB SITE
WCATWC.ARH.NOAA.GOV.

MEASUREMENTS OR REPORTS OF TSUNAMI ACTIVITY

 LOCATION                   LAT    LON     TIME        AMPL
 ------------------------  -----  ------  -------     -----------
 DART46419PT NW SEATTLE    48.8N  129.6W  0345UTC   00.2FT/00.07M
 CRAIG  AK                 55.5N  133.1W  0446UTC   00.3FT/00.10M
 PORT ALEXANDER  AK        56.2N  134.6W  0533UTC   00.4FT/00.14M
 WINTER HARBOUR  BC        50.7N  128.3W  0400UTC   00.5FT/00.16M
 SITKA  AK                 57.1N  135.3W  0425UTC   00.3FT/00.09M
 ELFIN COVE  AK            58.2N  136.3W  0448UTC   00.2FT/00.07M
 SITKA  AK                 57.1N  135.3W  0525UTC   00.3FT/00.09M
 YAKUTAT  AK               59.5N  139.7W  0523UTC   00.4FT/00.12M
 CHARLESTON  OR            43.3N  124.3W  0524UTC   00.3FT/00.09M
 GARIBALDI  OR             45.6N  123.9W  0515UTC   00.2FT/00.05M
 LA PUSH  WA               47.5N  124.4W  0448UTC   00.4FT/00.13M
 NEAH BAY  WA              48.4N  124.6W  0530UTC   00.3FT/00.10M
 PORT ORFORD  OR           42.7N  124.5W  0525UTC   00.5FT/00.15M
 SOUTH BEACH  OR           44.6N  124.0W  0524UTC   00.3FT/00.09M
 WESTPORT  WA              46.9N  124.1W  0550UTC   00.3FT/00.10M
 YAKUTAT  AK               59.5N  139.7W  0520UTC   00.3FT/00.08M
 ARENA COVE  CA            38.9N  123.7W  0637UTC   01.3FT/00.41M
 CRESCENT CITY  CA         41.7N  124.2W  0602UTC   00.8FT/00.23M
 NORTH SPIT  CA            40.8N  124.2W  0545UTC   00.3FT/00.09M
 SEWARD  AK                60.1N  149.4W  0600UTC   00.5FT/00.16M

TIME - TIME OF MEASUREMENT
AMPL - TSUNAMI AMPLITUDES ARE MEASURED RELATIVE TO NORMAL SEA LEVEL.
       IT IS ...NOT... CREST-TO-TROUGH WAVE HEIGHT.
       VALUES ARE GIVEN IN BOTH METERS/M/ AND FEET/FT/.

TSUNAMIS CAN BE DANGEROUS WAVES THAT ARE NOT SURVIVABLE. WAVE
HEIGHTS ARE AMPLIFIED BY IRREGULAR SHORELINE AND ARE DIFFICULT TO
FORECAST. TSUNAMIS OFTEN APPEAR AS A STRONG SURGE AND MAY BE
PRECEDED BY A RECEDING WATER LEVEL.  MARINERS IN WATER DEEPER
THAN 600 FEET SHOULD NOT BE AFFECTED BY A TSUNAMI. WAVE HEIGHTS
WILL INCREASE RAPIDLY AS WATER SHALLOWS. TSUNAMIS ARE A SERIES OF
OCEAN WAVES WHICH CAN BE DANGEROUS FOR SEVERAL HOURS AFTER THE
INITIAL WAVE ARRIVAL. DO NOT RETURN TO EVACUATED AREAS UNTIL AN
ALL CLEAR IS GIVEN BY LOCAL CIVIL AUTHORITIES.

PACIFIC COASTAL REGIONS OUTSIDE CALIFORNIA/ OREGON/ WASHINGTON/
BRITISH COLUMBIA AND ALASKA SHOULD REFER TO THE PACIFIC TSUNAMI
WARNING CENTER MESSAGES FOR INFORMATION ON THIS EVENT AT
PTWC.WEATHER.GOV.

THIS MESSAGE WILL BE UPDATED IN 60 MINUTES OR SOONER IF
THE SITUATION WARRANTS. THE TSUNAMI MESSAGE WILL REMAIN
IN EFFECT UNTIL FURTHER NOTICE. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION STAY TUNED
TO NOAA WEATHER RADIO... YOUR LOCAL TV OR RADIO STATIONS... OR SEE
THE WEB SITE WCATWC.ARH.NOAA.GOV.

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Screen shot 2012-10-24 at 4.02.36 PM

MISSING/ENDANGERED PERSON WANTED Solomon James Delgado

Posted on 24 October 2012 by admin

On 10/23/2012 Solomon James Delgado was reported to be missing by family members. Delgado was last seen on Monday, October 22nd, 2012 at around 12:00pm at 881 W 6th Ave, Junction City. Delgado left this location with all of his belongings and has not been heard from since. At this time there is no known clothing description and no known direction of travel. He is believed to possible frequent in the past the Eugene and Beaverton Oregon areas.
In addition, Delgado is wanted by the State of Oregon Youth Authority for unauthorized use of a motor vehicle.
If you see Solomon James Delgardo or have information pertaining to this subject or his whereabouts, please call Junction City Police Department at 541 998-1245 with any information or your local police department if seen.

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Burglar Strikes B&I Hardware Again!

Burglar Strikes B&I Hardware Again!

Posted on 24 October 2012 by admin

By Steve Rowland
Publisher
JUNCTION CITY – It is doubtful that the saying, ‘Third time is a charm,’ is going to work for this burglar. Upon opening B&I Hardware Store on Monday morning, owner Cary Claar discovered that he had been broken into for a second time in less than two months.
The Junction City Police Dept. came on the scene when summoned early Monday morning by Claar. The officer on the scene called Sgt. Chuck Salsbury with his K9 dog Ike to search the premises in case suspects were still in the building.
“A K9 dog is an efficient way to search quickly and safely,” Sgt. Salsbury said.  “We have collected evidence that the suspect had left behind in hopes of possibly indentifying a suspect. This is the second time, with the same MO [method of operation]. We are working every possible lead and processing all evidence in hopes of being able to solve this crime.”
Sgt. Salsbury added, “Burglaries often a direct offshoot from the money needs of meth and heroin users. We are doing all we can do. There are ways that business and homes can deter such criminals from entering their homes and property.  The recent crime wave, primarily break-ins, of the past few months has made business owners aware of their need to crime-proof their stores. Another store, the Video Revelation was broken into last week.
“There are some common elements in these burglaries,” Sgt. Salsbury said. “Poor lighting, improper door/window security, no video cameras, no horns or audio alarm—all contribute to helping the perp gain entry and, if they haven’t aroused suspicion they will continue to get what they want.”
In response to helping business owners and home owners to become more burglar-proof, the JCPD is willing to visit your property and review its needs for security.
Call Sgt. Salsbury directly at 541.998.1245 and make an appointment for an officer to review your needs and conduct a security check of any business or residence,” Sgt. Salisbury said.
“There will be no cost to anyone within Junction City. The JCPD is in contact with Rick Kissock of the Chamber [Junction City, Harrisburg and Monroe Chamber of Commerce] and are working for dates for a seminar on burglary/crime prevention presentation to the business community, and all who would like to attend. Kissock said that the first presentation will be held at a Chamber Networking Breakfast on Nov. 14, at 7am at the Junction City Moose Lodge.

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Screen shot 2012-10-23 at 11.10.45 PM

JC Skatepark opens after more than decade of planning

Posted on 24 October 2012 by admin

By Vera Westbrook
For the Tribune

JUNCTION CITY – After years of hard work, members of the JC Skatepark Development Committee will finally see the fruit of their labor payoff, as the JC skatepark holds its opening celebration on Saturday, Oct. 27, from noon to 2pm at the park located on Laurel St. and W. 14thAve.

As far as park construction is concerned, “We are pretty well done with the major construction aspects,” said JC Public Works Director Jason Knope at an Oct. 10 meeting.

Knope added that the city decided to seed the park with grass after receiving an offer for the job that cost about half the price of placing rock in the park. Irrigation was also installed. Knope said the sidewalk along the park would be done as well.

Community Services Department Director Melissa Bowers reported that sponsors for the event have been contacted and she was expecting a favorable turn out.

“We’ll have the ribbon and the big scissors with snipping occurring at noon,” Bowers said.

Tactics Board Shop from Eugene will set up a tent and hold a brief skate-team demonstration on top of coordinating a contest. Western Beverage Company agreed to bring a van to work from during the event. Both companies will bring loads of items to give away including Monster drink logo items, beverages and skate logo items. The Tony Hawk Foundation offered resources for giveaways as well.

“We have prizes, we have exhibitions, we have free product giveaways,” Councilor Randy Nelson said, who suggested the festivities should be held around the south area between the gazebo and Laurel Ave.

The committee expects a big turnout at the event with patrons coming from Eugene and Portland to partake in grand opening festivities, having heard about the park online. The grand opening will take place rain or shine.

Bowers also created a flyer to send out to all the local schools and skateparks as far as Veneta and Willamalane Park in Springfield.

After hashing out last minute opening details, the committee was content with the opening date and excited about a successful event. Completion of the skatepark is a major milestone for the city and big accomplishment for Councilor Randy Nelson, who’s been working on the project for the last 13 years.

“It’s so close you can taste it,” Nelson said.

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Alcohol abuse: fun and games can turn into catastrophe

Posted on 24 October 2012 by admin

 

By Brian Wolf
For the Tribune

 

Years ago, a priest was visiting a ‘Tobacco Road’ North Carolina jail when he was introduced to an elderly prisoner named Joshua.

Recalling the Biblical story of Joshua, who commanded the sun to stand still, the priest smiled and asked the man, “What are you in here for, making the sun stop?”

“No, Father,” replied the prisoner, “for making the moonshine!”

Of course, we can smile at that anecdote, but as we do, let’s remember that for thousands of underage drinkers, the moon will no longer shine as their sun has already set. Sadly for them, alcohol abuse led to an unfortunate and early demise.

Substance abuse by minors has long been a serious problem. Truancy, attention deficit, emotional instability, reckless driving, sexual promiscuity and other damaging traits can all be accentuated by substance abuse.  The long term impact on student achievement, relationships, reputations, futures, wallets and self-images is disastrous.

Hollywood productions frequently attempt to ‘glorify’ the college experience as one long drug and alcohol-soaked romp. However, dazed and confused stupors, skipping classes, failing grades and the ensuing loss of financial aid are hardly good news for college students to write home about.

Proud parents, who once wistfully sent Junior off to college, and sacrificed big bucks to keep him there, are unlikely to be amused by such antics when the college’s academic probation notice arrives in the mail, along with the bills for tuition, textbooks, fees and other school-related expenses.

Some might argue that being in school is a stressful experience and that students need to be able to blow off a little steam occasionally. While there is a kernel of truth behind that statement, today’s educational institutions provide their students with a plethora of opportunities to participate in truly healthy activities designed to enhance their learning experiences while providing a vehicle for a well-rounded education through physical, social, and leadership development. Athletics, community service, journalism, student government, music and drama are but several excellent examples of such good, clean fun.

In closing, I recall the time many years ago when, as a young teacher, I noticed that one my students had fallen asleep, face down at his desk. For kicks and giggles, I decided to play a practical joke on him.

When the school bell rang marking the end the period, I softly told the rest of the students to leave the classroom very quietly. Next, I stood at the door and hushed the incoming students.  My plan was to have the new class surround the youth, then wake him up and watch his reaction as he slowly realized that he was in a totally different class.

When the new class had settled in around him, I went over to his desk, stood about a foot from him and called his name.

Failing to gain his attention, I then shouted his name but still, there was no reaction.

Finally, growing somewhat alarmed, I firmly grasped his shoulders and shook them vigorously in a futile attempt to rouse him from his apparently deep slumber. Instead, he poured out of his desk, and slumped to the floor. His lips were caked with dried saliva and his face reflected a bluish cast.

The building principal, the ambulance and the police soon followed. Thankfully, the student in question survived a dangerous drug overdose that day, but I too learned a valuable lesson. What might appear to be simple fun and games in the beginning can easily turn to catastrophe.  While this is sometimes the case for seemingly harmless pranks, it is all too often tragically so in the case of illicit substance abuse.

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Called to serve

Posted on 24 October 2012 by admin

Risking her life more than once, Joyce Beck was called to teach people about God in Ghana

By Gini Bramlett
For the Tribune

 Junction City – Everyone has a story. Any journalist will tell you that. You just have to ask the right questions and most people will tell you things that might surprise you. And, Joyce Beck, a volunteer at Viking Sal Senior Center in Junction City who will be 80 is March, has one that might astound.

Joyce spent several years in Ghana, Africa as a missionary. That in itself isn’t so amazing, since most of us know dedicated people who have spent years as missionaries around the world with various organizations and churches. Joyce’s story is a little different.

She was called by the voice of God, but she refused to listen.

Joyce says she hesitates to tell people this since she thinks people will believe she is crazy, but Joyce says she did hear His voice back in the early 80s telling her to go to Africa. And, she argued with Him for a long time.

“I had reservations,” she said. She had just completed Bible School. It took her a year to decide.

Shortly after arriving in Africa, she was robbed. She was left with $60.

“I stayed two years and never had need of anything,” said Joyce. “God supplied everything.” She had just one dime left to call her daughter to pick her up at the airport when she got home.

She also had everything she owned stolen at one point, so she wore native garments during her stay. When she returned home, she went to schools displaying some of the clothing and gifts she’d received.

While in Ghana, she went from village to village teaching people about the Lord, staying in homes of the people and ultimately immersing herself in their culture and learning their languages. She also taught young children in nursery schools. At the church, she answered letters for people and prayed for them.

“I learned the languages by singing their songs. I’d win them over and they’d really listen to me.”

“They’d bring me big plates of food,” Joyce said. “They’d bring sick babies and I’d pray over them and they’d get well. The people there practiced voodoo and were used to giving something in return, so she’d ask for a glass of water.

“I’d stick my finger in it and touch their babies. I was really praying, but they were used to voodoo doctors who would ask them for something.”

While being there was an amazing experience for her, there were times when her very life was at stake. At one point she contracted cholera and was deathly ill. Another time gangs had a turf war where she rented a house from the church.

“Unfortunately, I wasn’t home or they would have killed me,” said Joyce. “I could have been killed I don’t know how many times. I’ve lost count, but my heavenly Father took care of me.”

She said that in spite of having no experience preaching in front of people, she was put in the position to do just that often.

“I wouldn’t know what to say,” said Joyce. “But the Lord would tell me what to say.” She was asked to preach to a group at a gathering of churches at a beach where more than 10,000 people were baptized.

In all, Joyce had two trips to Africa staying a total of about three years. She still has African friends who contact her. Some have even come to visit her.

Joyce will be 80 years old in March. She can no longer help in kitchen at Viking Sal preparing lunches like she used to. She’s served on the Viking Sal Advisory Board and has served as a senior companion in Eugene.

Now, she thinks it may be about time to leave Junction City and live near her youngest son in Idaho. But for now, three times a week Joyce still has lunch at Viking Sal with friends.

She says she doesn’t regret a minute of her experiences in Africa telling people about the Lord, even though at times, she’d risked her life.

“I wouldn’t trade that now for anything.”

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Birds and bees still buzzing in JC

Posted on 24 October 2012 by admin

JC commissioners draft proposed ordinance for fowl and bees

 by Vera Westbrook
for the Tribune

JUNCTION CITY – After being sent back to committee by the city council, the topic of allowing fowl and bees within the city limits had members of the JC Planning Commission brainstorming to come up with provisional regulations at an Oct. 16 meeting.

Interim City Planner Stacy Clauson gathered background information from other Oregon cities and distributed the material to commissioners to assist in drafting the ordinance. She also provided the recommendations prepared by City Administrator Kevin Watson that were previously presented to the city council.

“I want to look at what those regulations were, to look at what was proposed as it went forward to the city council, and then to see what your recommendation would be for an ordinance if we were to draft something for your review for the next meeting,” Clauson said.

Issues discussed included roosters, hen density, permits, lot size and bee colony density. Preliminary recommendations considered at the meeting are presented below.

Commissioners discussed allowing chickens for single-family dwellings in R1 and R2 zones. They also decided on a density of five hens per residence with no roosters.

Regarding permits, Clauson said, “It was the city manager’s recommendation not to have a permitting process, as it would take a lot of staff resources that we probably wouldn’t recoup in fees.” Commissioners decided not to recommend issuing permits.

Setbacks for chicken coops and runs from property lines and from adjoining residents were also discussed. Commissioners decided to stay in compliance with the standard setbacks already in place, with a 6-foot side-yard setback and a 15-foot setback for backyards. Alley lots would have no setbacks on the road side for the run and the coop.

Chickens also would be kept for personal use only and not for commercial use and they could not be slaughtered commercially. The same rules for chickens would also apply to ducks and other fowl.

Visiting the more complicated issue of bees, commissioners decided on limiting two colonies per city lot. The consensus for bees was to require education for beekeeping with educational certificates to be presented to the city. Beekeepers would also be required to supply a notice to neighbors living within 150 feet from their property lines.

A 6-foot fence or hedge for a bee flyaway area would be required as would a 10-foot setback from the rear or side property lines. Zoning would be the same as for chickens.

After collecting preliminary information, Clauson said she would return with draft provisions for an ordinance by the next meeting for further review by commissioners. Upon drafting a proposal, the planning commission will be seeking public feedback before sending the proposed ordinance to the city council.

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Forward movement in two major Coburg projects

Forward movement in two major Coburg projects

Posted on 24 October 2012 by admin

The first segment of loop path begins and wastewater project in final phase

 

By Vera Westbrook
For the Tribune

COBURG – Several major projects in the Coburg area are seeing forward movement, with construction of a multi-use path, a wastewater treatment plant and improvements to the I-5 Interchange well underway.

Called the Coburg Loop Path, the project proposes “a 10-foot-wide hard-surface path system that goes in and around the city of Coburg” connecting key areas in town, said City Administrator Petra Schuetz. The concrete path is intended for pedestrians and bicyclists and will be separated from the road. “We are building the first two segments right now.”

The first segment of the path is currently under construction with the Coburg I-5 interchange improvement project. The second part of the path is in the engineering phase and will be a northern extension of the first path system with building plans for next year. The city is currently applying for funding to build the third segment of the path near the Coburg Community Charter School.

The path under current construction is on the west side of the I-5 interchange beginning at Pearl St. and then running south about a quarter mile on the realigned South Coburg Industrial Way to intersect with Roberts Rd.

The second part of the path planned for next year will head north from Pearl St. up toward the newly named, ‘Coburg North’ light industrial area. It then heads west to Sarah Lane to connect to the residential neighborhood.

“The residential connection is essential, as this path system was community designed,” Schuetz said, which will allow residents and visitors to access the path much easier. “The residential connection is also the beginning of two ‘bike boulevard’ routes, which will cross town to make connections with other segments of the path over time.”

The third segment will improve the intersection at the Coburg Elementary School location with a possible path alignment south of Van Duyn Rd. along Coburg Bottom Loop.

“This effort also addresses a need for more balanced local transportation options and a beautiful, safe recreational amenity,” Schuetz said, as people should have options to move around without cars. “We are trying to use the existing public infrastructure more efficiently.”

Although path construction may be well underway, the entire project is a 20-year plan with some constraints.

“One of the constraints is that we are unable to build portions of the plan that are outside the Urban Growth Boundary/City limits,” Schuetz said, but ultimately the path will align with city expansion.

A fourth path segment planned for the distant future will complete the North Coburg Industrial Way extension to Coburg Wetlands Park.

In addition to the Coburg Loop, the City is developing bid documents in November for the ‘hook-up’ or Phase IV of the wastewater project—that’s the final phase where the pipes are hooked up to individual septic tanks.

“We have put all the pipe in the ground in the public right-of-way, and the wastewater treatment plant will be finished by the end of winter,” Schuetz said. “We will be hooking up the first business property to the treatment plant on Apr. 1.”

For more information about the Coburg Loop Path, the Coburg Wastewater Project and other major projects, visit the City of Coburg’s website at www.CoburgOregon.org

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Mysterious skeletons of Oregon history: If only these bones could talk …

Mysterious skeletons of Oregon history: If only these bones could talk …

Posted on 24 October 2012 by admin

By Finn J.D. John

In a few weeks, the streets of Oregon will be thick with trick-or-treaters again. And although the hot costumes this year include zombies, pirates and Batman, there will probably be one or two kids out there dressed as skeletons.
Skeletons may be out of fashion this year, but they’re arguably the most interesting Halloween artifact you could name. Skeletons are real; they’re dead, but were once alive; they can’t talk, but once could; and their cold and lifeless condition suggests that something dramatic, perhaps tragic, happened to them. If only they could talk ….
Oregon has a few skeleton-related mysteries — mysteries that we could clear right up if only those bones could tell us their story.
One of them dates back to 1911, and it involves the skeletons of horses, not humans; the skeletons of the humans, in this case, were never found.

Six white horses
It seems one sunny day, 101 years ago, a prospector was looking down into a valley in the Ochoco Forest and saw a log with a very strange profile — six identical notches in it, looking like they were cut that way on purpose.
The prospector hiked down into the forest to investigate — perhaps thinking he’d stumbled across an old homestead or mining claim.
When he got there, he found the skeletons of six horses, complete with the metal parts of long-rotted-away bridles and saddles. Clearly they had been tied to a log and left there to die of thirst. The desperate animals’ attempts to gnaw through the log had cut the notches that the prospector had seen from above.
Well, six saddle horses would have meant six riders; six riders who clearly tied their horses here in the middle of nowhere, meaning to come back for them in a matter of hours or maybe minutes. Six men who’d gone somewhere on foot, and not a single one of them had made it back. Six men whose presumed disappearance hadn’t made a big enough impression for anyone in the area to remember who they might be. What on Earth could have happened?
To this day, no one has figured that out.

Sandy
Legendary Central Oregon raconteur Reub Long tells a story of another mysterious skeleton.
Sometime in the early 1920s, when he was a young man, Reub was hauling freight with his hired hand, a six-foot-four Silver Lake lad named Shorty Hawkins. The two of them stopped at an abandoned cabin by Peters Creek Sink, in one of the most remote parts of the high desert of southeast Oregon.
Near the cabin, the two of them found a human skeleton, mostly buried in a sand bank and blasted by the cold and relentless high desert wind.
Was this the original builder of the cabin, a dry land homesteader trying to eke out a living on 320 acres of windswept desert? Had he perhaps broken an ankle stepping in a hole and died out here, hundreds of miles from the nearest settlement? What had happened to this stranger?
Reub and Shorty gathered up his bones and took them inside the cabin, out of the wind. There, they assembled them on the floor as best they could. There were quite a few bones missing, but the important ones — skull, pelvis, most of the ribs — were all there.
The skeleton, of course, had a name, but Reub and Shorty didn’t know what it was, so they dubbed him Sandy.
That done, the two went outside to take care of their team of horses. They were doing that when a cowboy rode up.
“We forgot all about the skeleton and told him to go in, get warm, and get himself something to eat,” Reub wrote years later in his book. “When we came back in, no one was there. Shorty said, ‘That’s funny. Sandy likes most people.’”

The Odd Fellows’ medical specimen
In August of 2010, a 16-year-old girl named Jenny Minten was helping clean out a closet at the International Order of Odd Fellows hall in Scio, when she made a startling and creepy discovery.
It was a small black casket full of human bones.
The bones turned out to be part of the ceremonial accoutrements of the Scio Odd Fellows. This particular chapter was chartered in 1856, and the induction rituals for the Odd Fellows include a memento mori — usually in the form of a skeleton.
Today, active Odd Fellows chapters don’t typically use real skeletons for this, but at one time they did. This particular skeleton was bought out of a catalog — an Odd Fellows ‘regalia and paraphernalia’ catalog — sometime in the late 1800s, according to the recollections of Scio Odd Fellows and Rebekahs members.
This raises a number of fascinating questions. In the late 1800s, most people weren’t open to the idea of donating their bodies to science, and it was quite difficult for medical schools to slake their thirst for fresh cadavers to dissect.
So an entire underground industry developed on the East Coast — an industry devoted to stealing corpses and selling them to medical schools.
Body snatchers, or ‘resurrectionists’ as they called themselves, would prowl graveyards looking for fresh diggings, and bribe undertakers to slip them corpses. They’d even go into poorhouses and impersonate relatives so they could claim bodies. (In Britain, some body snatchers actually started murdering people so their bodies could be sold. In the U.S., so far as is known, nobody ever went quite that far.)
All of which is to say that it is somewhat unlikely the man whose bones the Odd Fellows bought had any idea that this would be his fate.
The bones were donated to the Oregon State University anthropology department, where they were cleaned and analyzed and served as the subject of OSU student Dawn Marie Alapisco’s Honors College thesis. Alapisco reports the bones belonged to a powerful, strong man, nearly six feet tall and ripped; the skeleton had developed in a way that telegraphed ‘muscular hypertrophy.’ His neck, back and knees were worn and bent in ways that suggested he’d carried many heavy loads. And he’d died of tuberculosis, which had eaten into his bones; by the time he died, his right arm would have been useless. He was 45 to 55 years old. He died sometime between 1860 and 1890, but probably closer to 1890, since that’s when his bones were sold.
That means he would have been at or near fighting age during the American Civil War. Did he fight in it? What did he do for a living, this job that made his muscles so big and wore him out so soon? Could he have been a deepwater sailor? His skull bears an odd resemblance to Popeye the Sailor Man. Or was he perhaps a ‘misery whip’-era logger, or longshoreman or something else? Did he have a family, maybe a son or daughter to bury him and cry and put flowers by his tombstone, never dreaming that someone had slipped by one night and stolen his corpse out of the ground? Or was he one of those unclaimed dead in the poorhouse, left destitute after a life of working too hard for not enough, with no family, dying painfully of consumption, alone?
Just one thing is sure: We’ll never know.

(Sources: Braly, David. Tales from the Oregon Outback. Prineville: Kilmarnock, 1978; Long, R.A., and Jackman, E.R. The Oregon Desert. Caldwell, Idaho: Caxton, 1977; Smith, McKinley. “Skeleton in the Closet,” OSU Daily Barometer, June 7, 2012; Alapisco, Dawn Marie. “The Skeleton in the Closet,” OSU Honors College thesis, 2012)

Finn J.D. John is an instructor at Oregon State University and the author of “Wicked Portland,” a book about the dark side of Oregon’s metropolis in the 1890s. To contact him or suggest a topic: finn@offbeatoregon.com, @OffbeatOregon (on Twitter), or 541-357-2222.

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Triangle Lake Pesticide Scare

Triangle Lake Pesticide Scare

Posted on 17 October 2012 by admin

“We don’t have pollution and we don’t have more of anything here than anybody else.” Barbara Anderson

Map courtesy of Google Maps

By Vera Westbrook
For the Tribune

TRIANGLE LAKE – Some Triangle Lake residents believe their community’s been targeted with too many negative reports about pesticides in their drinking water, making the area appear more contaminated than it actually is.
The most recent article grasping the attention of Triangle Lake residents is an Oct. 1 opinion piece published in The Register-Guard written by Day Owen that mentioned a Triangle Lake school tested positive for one or more pesticides in its drinking water. The article also stated, “In other recent testing, nearly 100 percent of Triangle Lake residents were found to have 2, 4-D in their urine.”
The 2012 results of a recent Oregon Health Authority (OHA) study testing 64 residents in the Triangle Lake area living within 1.5 miles of a forestry spray area found that 59 residents had and an average urine level of the pesticide 2,4-D at 0.4 micrograms per gram of Creatinine, with levels ranging from not detectable to 37.33 micrograms per gram.
In the OHA study, this amount was found to be comparable to the amount found nationwide determined by a National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, which showed that 95 percent of the U.S. population had 2,4-D levels in urine below 1.08 micrograms per gram. The OHA study only tested for Atrazine and 2,4-D as those two chemicals are sprayed in the neighboring forests and have laboratory-testing methods available. No Atrazine was detected in urine.
“We are not all dripping of pesticides out here; it’s really a clean area,” said Triangle Lake resident Barbara Triangle Lake Pesticide Scare
“We don’t have pollution and we don’t have more of anything here than anybody else.” Barbara Anderson
By Vera Westbrook
For the Tribune

TRIANGLE LAKE – Some Triangle Lake residents believe their community’s been targeted with too many negative reports about pesticides in their drinking water, making the area appear more contaminated than it actually is.
The most recent article grasping the attention of Triangle Lake residents is an Oct. 1 opinion piece published in The Register-Guard written by Day Owen that mentioned a Triangle Lake school tested positive for one or more pesticides in its drinking water. The article also stated, “In other recent testing, nearly 100 percent of Triangle Lake residents were found to have 2, 4-D in their urine.”
The 2012 results of a recent Oregon Health Authority (OHA) study testing 64 residents in the Triangle Lake area living within 1.5 miles of a forestry spray area found that 59 residents had and an average urine level of the pesticide 2,4-D at 0.4 micrograms per gram of Creatinine, with levels ranging from not detectable to 37.33 micrograms per gram.
In the OHA study, this amount was found to be comparable to the amount found nationwide determined by a National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, which showed that 95 percent of the U.S. population had 2,4-D levels in urine below 1.08 micrograms per gram. The OHA study only tested for Atrazine and 2,4-D as those two chemicals are sprayed in the neighboring forests and have laboratory-testing methods available. No Atrazine was detected in urine.
“We are not all dripping of pesticides out here; it’s really a clean area,” said Triangle Lake resident Barbara Anderson. “We don’t have pollution and we don’t have more of anything here than anybody else.”
Although Owen’s article further stated that government agencies found that the levels of pesticides detected were safe, Owen’s concern was about the unknown affect of multiple pesticides used together. Owen also suggested tougher laws to protect the public from chemical drift in water and air.
Anderson is proud of the Triangle Lake area and fears that bad press targeting the area will scare the public and cause folks to avoid the place.
“People won’t want to come out here and swim in our lake and they won’t want to send their children to our school,” she said. “We have a beautiful school out here and a beautiful lake with fish jumping every few minutes—you can even see the bottom of the lake!”
Anderson would like to see less negative media about the Triangle Lake area.
“It would be beneficial to the community if we would all work together to make a plan and do what we can if there is a big issue wrong, as this is not the right approach,” she said.
Please see the online version of the story for web addresses for the OHA study results, The-Register-Guard article and YouTube videos of meetings about the study and the subject of pesticides in the Triangle Lake area.

The results for the Triangle lake study done in 2011 can be viewed at Oregon Health Authorities web page: http://public.health.oregon.gov/HealthyEnvironments/TrackingAssessment/EnvironmentalHealthAssessment/Documents/EI factsheet_final.pdf

Summary: http://public.health.oregon.gov/HealthyEnvironments/TrackingAssessment/EnvironmentalHealthAssessment/Documents/EI%20factsheet_final.pdf

Full version: http://www.atsdr.cdc.gov/HAC/pha/Hwy36CorridorEIReport/Highway36CorridorEI03052012.pdf

Video YouTube links to April 2012 OHA pesticide study meeting at the grange in Triangle Lake;

Part 1

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QUYnFZSSZTI

 

Part 2

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oSoSCjB5kNU&feature=relmfu

Part 3

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=50flDClXVpg&list=UU48FVT5EWjmvbzKQpQZMGNQ&index=2&feature=plcp

Part 4

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TY7U994sC1c&list=UU48FVT5EWjmvbzKQpQZMGNQ&index=1&feature=plcp

Link to the guest viewpoint written by Day Owen of the Pitchfork Rebellion in the Register guard on Oct. 1:

http://www.registerguard.com/web/opinion/28800695-47/drinking-pesticides-schools-atrazine-oregon.html.csp

Link to OHA school well water test results

http://public.health.oregon.gov/HealthyEnvironments/DrinkingWater/SourceWater/Pages/pdp-schools.aspx

 

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JCPD Drug Buster

Posted on 17 October 2012 by admin

JC police officer gets re-certified as drug recognition expert

photo by Vera Westbrook
As a drug recognition expert, Junction City Police Officer Brian Paterson wears a stethoscope around his neck that he uses when determining the cause of a driver’s impairment. He says that marijuana tops the list of drugs that people get pulled over for while driving under the influence.

By Vera Westbrook
For the Tribune

JUNCTION CITY – Alcohol isn’t the only substance that causes people to drive recklessly. Prescriptions, illicit drugs and even illnesses can impair a driver as well, making it tough for police officers to determine the cause of impairment. To determine the cause, an expert is often consulted for advice.
Officer Brian Paterson is the JC Police Department expert who assists with impairment identification. Paterson was trained as a drug recognition expert (DRE) in 2010 and was recently recertified. When a driver fails a roadside test but doesn’t register on an alcohol intoxilyzor machine, Paterson comes in to examine the individual.
“My job as a DRE is to decide if the person is impaired, and if so, is the impairment because of drugs or is it medical?” he said.
Paterson spends about an hour using a specific protocol to test for seven categories of drugs. If the cause is medical like diabetes, a paramedic may need to be called; if the cause is drugs, the drug needs to be identified.
“It’s a 12-step standardized examination process that we go through, where we talk with the person, talk with the arresting officer and run the person through standard roadside tests again,” Paterson said. He also performs clinical tests such as reading blood pressure and determining eye pupil size under different lighting conditions.
“Based on all of this we have a matrix that we use where we put all the signs and symptoms together to see what a driver is under the influence of,” Paterson said. A sample of the driver’s urine is then sent to the Oregon State Police crime lab to verify the determination.
Out of almost 50 states, Europe and Canada who use the program, “Oregon’s DRE program always rates in the top three worldwide as far as quality of accuracy of calls,” Paterson said, along with Washington and Arizona. “The Oregon State Police run a really good program,” with other states often calling on Oregon instructors for training.
But becoming a DRE is not easy. Once accepted into the program, an officer attends a training school for two weeks. “The training is delivered by police officers, doctors and different professionals to teach you about how different drugs affect the system.” Extensive memorization of physiology and pharmacology is involved.
After passing the school, the officers must then pass a practical field test where they examine actual drug users to test for accurate drug determinations. A daylong written exam is than taken, and once passed, an officer is certified as a DRE. Only one percent of police officers are DREs, so Paterson helps other departments in the area as well.
Since certification as a DRE in 2010, Paterson has made 93 evaluations with an accuracy rate in the upper 90 percentile. Although he may be highly accurate, all his evaluations are still verified with an area coordinator for quality control.
Paterson, who’s had extensive law enforcement training in SWAT, Taser, patrol rifle and less lethal training, considers DRE training “by far the most demanding training I’ve ever done in law enforcement. It was hard!”

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A generation of accountability

Posted on 17 October 2012 by admin

Laurel’s recent school designation opens doors to improvement

By Vera Westbrook
For the Tribune

Laurel Elementary School students will see some changes soon with its new designation as a Focus School, as the state will provide funds and training to assist educators in making improvements

JUNCTION CITY – Laurel Elementary School is on the way to reaping the benefits of an amended education act that aims to consolidate state initiatives with federal requirements. Laurel’s recent Focus School designation has opened the door to federal funding that targets increasing growth in learning.
In July, the federal government granted Oregon approval for its Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA) application, a waiver from the No Child Left Behind (NCLB) Act that plans to assist Oregon schools in increasing accountability and meeting the needs of students.
This flexibility waiver will help Oregon reach its 40-40-20 goal to increase the level of education of all state citizens. States will receive more tools to support schools through a new rating system that replaces the federal Adequate Yearly Progress sanctions of NCLB.
The waiver created an accountability system to rate Elementary schools by academic achievement, academic growth and subgroup growth. Laurel is one of 95 Oregon Title 1 schools identified in July that will receive support and intervention from the state to help increase student achievement and close persistent achievement gaps.
As a Title 1 school with a population of nearly 60 percent economically disadvantaged students, Laurel will receive additional state support to increase yearly learning growth for subgroups. These subgroups include English language learners and the economically disadvantaged. One way of measuring this growth is through significant changes in test scores between grades, especially third and fourth grades.
At a Sept. 24 Junction City School District board meeting, Laurel Principal Bill Bechen presented the board with updates on his school’s progress as a Focus School, which he’ll present at every board meeting.
Since the last board meeting, a leadership team with representatives from each grade level has been busy completing a comprehensive self-evaluation using an online tool available from the state. The tool offers more than 200 indicators found in high performing schools and asks that Laurel assess the level each of those indicators exist at Laurel. The state will then take the online input and help Laurel create a future plan.
The leadership team also will be traveling to conferences in Portland and Salem, with the state allocating $5,000 to support this initial self-assessment phase and learn about creating a comprehensive achievement plan.
“So far, the process has generated a lot of candid conversations and reflection about how we can improve student outcomes across the school,” Bechen said. “The leadership team has met many times since August and I want to acknowledge the time, energy and commitment these teachers are putting into the process on top of their classroom responsibilities. The entire group is engaged and positive about moving Laurel forward and improving student outcomes.”
For more information, visit the school website at www.junctioncity.k12.or.us/Laurel/ or make an appointment with Bechen at 541.998.2386.

 

In 2012, the Elementary and Secondary Education Act will implement the following features in Oregon schools:
Aligning achievement compacts that allow each district to describe how it will improve key student outcomes
Creating an accountability system so underserved students demonstrate academic growth and achieve higher graduation rates
Emphasizing individual student growth and demonstrating proficiency in reading and math
Customizing support plans to help struggling schools
Supporting professional growth through a collaborative teacher and administrator evaluation system

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