Archive | November, 2012

wreath

Soroptimist International of Junction City News

Posted on 14 November 2012 by admin

JUNCTION CITY – On Nov. 15, Soroptimists will be hosting a social meeting for women in the area who are interested in knowing what our mission and goals are for women and girls. A light dinner will be served at 6pm at 240 Tamara St. in Junction City.  RSVP to Claudia Liontos-Bailey at 541.915.6728.
The monthly program meeting will be at Shadow Hills on Nov. 27 at 5:30pm. Speaker will be Kathy Furrer from the Junction City Community Center. Community members are welcome and appetizers are served for $6.
Soroptimist International of Junction City is selling Christmas wreaths, and orders are now being taken for 24” and 36” beautiful wreaths. Deadline to order is Nov. 24, with wreaths available for pick-up on Dec. 3.  Please contact Gail Cross at tgcross @msn.com for ordering. Two sizes available – 24” ($30) and 30” ($60) including a bow (red, white, gold or silver).
The annual awards program is in full gear and the following deadlines for applications for our four awards are as follows:
Dec. 1, 2012:
Violet Richardson Award – for girls 14-17 living in the Tri-County area. Girls who are involved in a volunteer capacity can apply for this award. $250 goes to her charity and $250 goes to the winner.  Contact Janice Adelman at janice_adelman@comcast.net for an on-line application.
Ruby Award – A woman who is involved in volunteering or coordinating a non-profit which helps women and children in a positive way will be able to give her organization $500 from Soroptimist International of Junction City. Contact Nancy Gifford at 541 998 1720 for on-line applications.
Dec. 15, 2012:
Woman’s Opportunity Award – A $1000 award to a woman who is continuing her education in undergraduate studies or vocational will be awarded. The woman must be the head of the household. Contact Kim Turner at 541.554.9050 for applications and further qualifications.
Jan. 15, 2013:
Fellowship Award – A $500 award for a woman working on her post-undergraduate degree, this has a January deadline. Contact Ellie Dumdi for more information at 541.998.8878.
The Bunches of Lunches program is running well. Contact Stacy Hunts for information at 541.998.9328.
Soroptimist International of Junction City welcomes anyone in the community who would like to be a part of the club. Contact President Lynda Taylor at 541.998.8294 for applications.
Meetings are held the second Tuesday at Shadow Hills Country Club at noon and include a $10 lunch. Reservations are required.

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A Nation of Ghouls

Posted on 14 November 2012 by admin

By Gary Crum
For the Tribune

As shameful as it is to admit, we’ve become a nation of ghouls. An auto accident on a divided highway slows both directions of traffic: one to detour around the wreck and the other slowing to a crawl as folks gawk at the carnage.
Fans would be bitterly disappointed if a hockey game didn’t have several good fights, and NASCAR without spectacular high-speed wrecks, wouldn’t be the billion dollar industry it represents.
College boys will stand around, beers in hand and cheer as two of their friends stumble around wildly swinging at each other. And face it, watching two women fight has become a real treat.
We lock away a pro football quarterback for his involvement in dog fighting, then go to the fairgrounds on Saturday night to watch ‘cage-fights’, an event as close to the Coliseum of ancient Rome as we’ve dared go so far.
We thrive on violence and conflict. We read daily of incidents of ‘road rage’ wherein a lane change, a failure to yield, or some other driving error leads to verbal violence, often escalating to physical violence and often injury or death.
Spousal, child and elder abuse are epidemic. Though we would never admit it, H. Rap Brown was all too right, “Violence is as American as apple pie.” Unfortunately, it’s not just ‘something in the water’. If it were, we could just remove it. Instead, it’s something in the culture and even though we all know it’s there, we seem unable or unwilling to remove it.
Films and video games glorify violence with good prevailing over evil through violent means. Our foreign policy has changed, with violence having become the first, not the last course of action. Of course the invasion of Iraq represented the epitome of this mindset.
Our current involvement in Afghanistan is premised on a victory based on the hope for a violent resolution to a centuries old cultural tradition of conflict. Could it be there’s something wrong with this picture?
We’re just as ghoulish as we study the news. Those supermarket tabloids don’t prosper by printing feel good stories. Instead, we devour their tales of sordid behavior and personal disaster.
The main stream media is little better. News has become entertainment, and realizing the brevity of Americans’ attention span, the media – especially the TV media – has condensed comments to thirty second sound bites accompanied by the most titillating video feed available. The phrase ‘no news is good news’ has taken on a whole new meaning.
We’re just as guilty as we wallow in the sordid pleasures of others’ failings. Nothing pleases like the exposed hypocrisy of someone we don’t like. I admit to relishing the exposures of Tom Delay, Newt Gingrich, Mark Foley and Larry Craig; with Rush Limbaugh’s exposure as a drug addict being truly the cherry on top of the chocolate sundae.
I’m sure those on the right side of the political spectrum have had some of these same dark pleasures. Mention the late Ted Kennedy and they see not his many accomplishments for working class Americans, but a bridge in Chappaquiddick. I’m sure insurance company executives and defense attorneys are still giggling over John Edwards’ fall from grace. We like someone we admire to ‘look good’ but really, the greatest pleasure comes when someone we don’t like looks really, really bad.
Political operatives and campaign managers, being both astute students of the American psyche and consummate cynics, have built their professional reputations and personal fortunes by capitalizing on our fixation on negative information. They realize we’re far more likely to watch, listen to or read (and be influence by) negative information about the opponent than we are positive information about their candidate.
Alice Roosevelt Longworth famously quipped, “If you can’t say something nice about someone, come and sit by me.” It seems we’re all crowding around Alice during every election cycle. Don’t bother telling me something good about your candidate; give me the dirt on your opponent.
And, of course, it works. John Kerry served his country honorably in Vietnam while George W. Bush used his father’s influence to avoid such service. Yet the focus of the election, thanks to the ‘Swift-Boaters for Truth’ was on Kerry’s service record (and well-publicized lies denigrating it) rather than on Bush’s avoidance of service.
The ’08 campaign was no better. We read and saw that Obama’s father was a Muslim and McCain didn’t know how many houses he owned and such information overshadowed any discussion of either candidate’s positions on the many issues of the campaign. President Obama has faced four years of ‘birthers’ questioning his citizenship and racists attacking him based not on his job performance, but his African American heritage. Virtually every campaign in the 2012 election cycle has involved more attacks on opponents than rationale for supporting your own candidate.
Can things change? Perhaps, but it won’t be easy. Hockey without fights, NASCAR without wrecks, movies and video games without blood and gore, friends discouraging rather than encouraging their drunken buddies to fight, cage fights cancelled for lack of ticket sales and a political campaign without a huge mud-fight? I know they’re boring ideas; but hey, I’m tired; bore me for a change.

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My Journey with Cancer

Posted on 14 November 2012 by admin

Lance Stoddard
For the Tribune
Part 1 of 4
In 2009, I noticed that I was frequently feeling extremely fatigued, waking up from drenching night sweats and always feeling that I had not had enough sleep even though I’d slept for eight or more hours. I also noticed a pair of weird bumps at the base of my neck on the left shoulder that had been steadily getting bigger as time went on.
In January 2010 I had my annual blood draw at the VA Clinic in Eugene and saw the VA doctor who assured me that even though my PSA was a little elevated at 7.5 everything was okay. He also mentioned that the PSA test and digital examinations were no longer considered good indicators of Prostate Cancer but he would perform the digital if I so desired. Since I knew that there was nothing wrong with me (other than borderline diabetes), and I really did not care to have someone with his finger in that very personal spot, I declined and went on my way.
In February, 2010 I lost 30 pounds within a 30-day period and was also the victim of an extreme case of diarrhea. This was surely due to a really bad case of food poisoning. At least I thought so.
In May 2010 I had another blood test and an appointment with a civilian doctor. He examined my blood work and promptly told me to strip and lay down on the examining table with my face toward the wall so he could perform a digital exam. (note that he did not ask me if I was in favor of this or not).
After the exam he scheduled me for a ‘just-in-case’ appointment for a colonoscopy and also with a urologist at the Oregon Urology Clinic. Since this was already starting to get personal, I decided to ask him what the bumps on my neck were. He examined them and set me up with a consult with a Dr. Sorom (an Ear/Nose/Throat specialist) for the following Tuesday.
I met with Dr. Sorom on the appointed day and he explained to me that the bumps were lymph nodes, they were swollen and that he would like to biopsy them to see what the problem was. Since I was already in the office, I asked him to do it right then and there so that I would not have to make any extra trips. He deadened the area and proceeded to excise them.
I had had a biopsy on my leg a few years ago and it was such a small incision the doctor hadn’t even bothered with deadening. I was really surprised at the size of the objects cut out. They were the size of large marbles. He asked me to return in a week to get the results of the biopsy. I was still under the impression that I don’t have anything really wrong with me. My wife was much more worried than I was.
We were back the following Tuesday and the news he had was outside of even my imaginative abilities. He said that I had a form of Lymphoma and that it was one of ‘Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia’ (CLL), ‘Small Lymphocytic Leukemia’ (SLL) or ‘Mantle Cell Lymphoma’ (MLL). Of these three, CLL was the most survivable and MLL was really bad. The biopsy had revealed that I was the proud possessor of a blood cancer, but it did not reveal the exact type.
He scheduled me for a consult with Dr Sharman, an oncologist with the Willamette Cancer Institute, for the following Monday. Now my wife and I were really worried (scared shitless actually). I never thought that I would pray for cancer, but we sure were casting our lots that it would be CLL and not one the others.
The next week (my 64th birthday), I had a blood draw and my wife and I were escorted into Dr. Sharman’s office. We held our breath until he told us that, yes, it was CLL and if you have to have cancer, that is the one to have. I was put on a watch-and-wait status. With watch-and-wait you have a periodic blood test and doctor’s visit but nothing else is done (unless the blood test shows something is seriously wrong). I didn’t feel any better, but at least my wife and I weren’t worried any more.
That same afternoon I had my appointment with a urologist. He turned out to be Dr. Mehlhof. He examined my PSA numbers and since they were a bit high (8.0), he asked me to strip for another digital rectal exam. With the last few weeks as worrisome as they were, my hemorrhoids were in really bad shape. I balked, but he insisted. I will admit that I was glad that Dr. Mehlhof has skinny fingers. He said that he found a rough spot on my prostate and that he would like to schedule a biopsy. At that time I saw no problem with another biopsy since I now had had a leg and a shoulder biopsied.

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Mark Chase

What is DUI or DUII arrest?

Posted on 14 November 2012 by admin


What is a DUI or DUII arrest?

Simple answer—the acronyms are synonymous: Driving Under the Influence of alcohol or drugs or a combination thereof.
As stated last week, from 1995 to present, Oregon has lost an average of 125 lives per year due to those with .08 blood alcohol content. It is interesting to note that an additional 20-40 lives were lost showing a blood alcohol content of .01-.07. The extended suffering that accompanies these statistics cannot be calculated.

A DUI is a serious arrest. It is likely the driver will pay attorney fees, fines, court costs, ignition interlock installation and operation, car insurance up-charge or cancellation, possible jail and therefore time off from their job (maybe permanently), a suspended driver’s license (which means you will use friends or public transportation or ??) and a criminal record.
A comprehensive privately owned website on DUI is www.dmv.org. They state:
Always be mindful of the following:
Drinking and driving is the leading cause of death for Americans 17-24 years old.
The cost of an average DUI is $3,000.
70 people die each day in America in drunk driving accidents.
Upon 1st conviction of .08 you might get an ignition interlock, if allowed to drive
Oregon’s DMV handbook clearly states in numerou

s places that driving is a ‘privilege.’ When a person signs the form to get his/her driver’s license they agree that it is a privilege. When they sign they also agree to Oregon’s ‘implied consent law.’ That law says that you will consent to a police officer request to take a breath, blood and/or urine test to determine alcohol/drug levels in your body.
Next week, we will present a chart that will show the allowable suspensions in DUI tests. It will answer the question, ‘Is it smart to refuse to take a test?’

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Carol Knight

Harrisburg Woman Meets Family after a 57-Year Search

Posted on 14 November 2012 by admin

Submitted Photo
Carol Knight of Harrisburg (in blue blouse) visited her long lost family in Alberta, Canada in September after searching since she was 11. Now, after 57 years as an only child, she was united with her 91-year-old mother and nine siblings.

Carol Knight flew to Canada in September to meet birth mother and nine sibs

By Gini Bramlett
For the Tribune

HARRISBURG – On Sept. 6 Carol Knight flew to Calgary, Alberta, Canada to meet her mother and nine siblings for the first time. The experience was emotional for Knight who had only known about her long lost family since her youngest daughter had communicated with one of Knight’s brothers on Facebook last spring.
“I always felt lonely and thought I should have a brother or a sister,” Carol said, who was raised as an only child, but was armed with the knowledge that she was adopted. “I knew my mom’s name was Bessie Will, but that’s all I knew.”
Carol began searching for her mother when she was 11 years old while doing an essay on her background for school, and has continued her search for the past 57 years.  “When computers came out, I really got going,” she said. She was unsuccessful, but never gave up.
Then, two years ago, things changed for Bessie’s family in Calgary when, after her husband’s death, she told her children they had an older sister, the child to whom she’d given birth on Aug. 3, 1945. She was unmarried at the time and struggled to raise Heather Jean on her own, never telling anyone.
“She didn’t want her late husband to know,” said Carol. “Her parents didn’t even know.”
Finally, with no other choice, Bessie gave her two-month old baby to a family who could give what she couldn’t.
“She didn’t want to, but she was a restaurant worker and had no other choice,” said Carol.
Since then, every year on Aug. 3, Bessie has baked a cake, telling her family that it was a special occasion, but nothing specific. Now they know. Bessie had never forgotten the child she relinquished to give her a better life.
It only took her brother, Daryl three days to connect with Carol’s daughter, Brenda.
“It was meant to be,” Carol said. “It was divine intervention.”
Carol, anxious about the reunion in September, was greeted at the airport in Calgary by several of her siblings and a huge bouquet of lilies.
“I just had a meltdown,” she said. According to Carol, it has come full circle.
“It’s like we’ve never been apart.”
Now, after living most of her life as an only child, Carol has nine siblings (four sets of twins and a single) and has finally met her birth mom, who is 92 and living in a care center in Calgary.
“She looked at me and called me her golden girl,” said Carol. “They (siblings) said it was the first time she had smiled in a long time.”
Recently she met a woman who had found her family, too. She told Carol that if it hadn’t been for her, she would have stopped her search.
Carol said if she can help just one person find their family, it’s worth her stay on earth.

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Building

Building on the Rise

Posted on 14 November 2012 by admin

photo by Steve Rowland
New commercial construction may be low nationally, but Monroe is seeing some upward movement in construction with the new Monroe Community Library scheduled for completion in March.

New construction points to economy picking up
By Vera Westbrook
For The Tribune

TRI-COUNTY – With mortgage rates falling and the consumer confidence index recently rising to its highest level in five years, buyers have made a comeback with residential construction increasing nationally and even in neighboring towns such as Springfield. The tri-county area is also seeing construction in not just the residential sector, but commercially.
“Through the end of September of this year, we’ve had 24 permits issued for new homes,” said Teri Andrews, the administrative assistant in Junction City’s planning and building department. That’s almost double the permits issued for the entire year of 2011, when only 13 permits were issued for single-family homes.
New commercial construction may be at a national low, but the JC state mental hospital expects to see upward movement in construction after January. Andrews also mentioned a few commercial remodels are underway to spruce up the town.
Guaranty Chevrolet on Hwy. 99 and First Avenue is in the middle of a commercial remodel tentatively scheduled for completion in December. The new car showroom and automobile service department are being remodeled with some parking lot resurfacing work also going on.
Down the street, the Dari Mart family is also remodeling the former Shell station site on Ivy St. adjacent to the existing Dari Mart store. A Junction City-based company, Dari Mart has been planning to bring a modern Dari Mart store into its hometown for years and is on the way to completion.
Unlike JC, Harrisburg only saw a few residential houses going up earlier in the year, but is currently seeing commercial construction of a new Subway Restaurant on the northeast corner of Third and Smith streets.
“Construction started a couple weeks ago, and the last I heard it was supposed to be opening in about a month,” City Administrator Bruce Cleaton said. The city also has its own plans for construction in the future.
“We are trying to get some grants and do some fundraising for a new library,” Cleaton said. “We are about a third of the way toward our fundraising goal.” Needing about $1.2 million, the city has already raised about $400,000. The city is also taking other steps to encourage local construction.
“We’re still working on an expansion of our Urban Growth Boundary to accommodate growth needs of future construction projects,” Cleaton said.
Like Harrisburg, Monroe saw limited residential construction with only one new residential home being built, but Monroe’s chief operating officer Jim Minard said, “There’s a little bit of commercial development and expansion at the Broadley Vineyards.”
He also mentioned a 92-lot residential subdivision on the south side of Monroe south of Orchard St. that was put on hold while developers wait for the economy to improve. But the good news for Monroe is that it’s seeing construction of the new Monroe Community Library on Fifth St. scheduled for completion in March.

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Collaring Druggies and Thieves

Collaring Druggies and Thieves

Posted on 14 November 2012 by admin

Lane County INET assists JCPD with Drug Search Warrant

James A. Collotta

Misty M. Varkhimer

Phillip Bustemante

Troy A. Snow

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

By JCPD Chief Mark Chase

JUNCTION CITY – ***Press Release — On Nov. 8 2012 the Lane County Interagency Narcotic Enforcement Team (INET) which is comprised of officers from the Oregon State Police, Springfield Police, Eugene Police, deputies from Lane County Sheriff’s Office and a prosecutor from Lane County District provided their professional expertise and staff resources in conducting an investigation into a suspected drug house located a 335 Dorsa St. in Junction City, Oregon.
INET was instrumental in assisting the Junction City Police Department with their investigation that had been ongoing for approximately 18 months with the execution of a search warrant at approximately 2:12pm, November 8th, 2012.

Five subjects were detained at 335 Dorsa St. during the execution of the warrant for possession and distribution of methamphetamine. While at the residence numerous items were found and an additional warrant was written and obtained by INET for stolen property. Eugene Police detectives responded to assist with securing addition suspected stolen property.
The following four persons are being referred by INET to the Lane County District Attorney’s Office for criminal prosecution:

James A. Callotta DOB; 08/31/56, 335 Dorsa St., OR. Unlawful delivery of methamphetamine, Unlawful possession of methamphetamine, possession of marijuana, Felon in possession of a restricted weapon and potential charges for Theft by receiving.

Troy A. Snow DOB: 09/14/89, 335 Dorsa St., OR. Unlawful delivery of methamphetamine, Frequenting a place where controlled substances are used.

Phillip Bustemante DOB: 12/14/55, 87537 Territorial Hwy, Veneta, OR. Frequenting a place where controlled substances are used.

Misty M. Varkhimer DOB: 03/03/80, 1479 Linda Ave. Eugene, OR. Frequenting a place where controlled substances are used.
7.4 grams of methamphetamine was seized, digital scales, packaging materials for delivery of methamphetamine and multiple methamphetamine pipes.***

After issuing the press release, Chief Chase added:
“I cannot say enough positive about the assistance that the Lane County Interagency Narcotics Enforcement Team (INET) provided us yesterday.  INET is comprised of officers from the Oregon State Police, Springfield Police, Eugene Police the Lane County Sheriff’s Office and a prosecutor from the Lane County District Attorney’s Office.
“Junction City Police has been investigating the suspected drug house at 335 Dorsa St. for approximately 18 months. With our current staffing limitations and resources we could have never been able to conduct the operations needed without the assistance of INET. We are very appreciative of the assistance, expertise and resources INET provided to our police department, community and particular to the neighborhood that has been directly affected by the drug activity.

“The cooperation, communication and collaborative efforts of law enforcement agencies working together helps enhance Public Safety in Junction City and the entire Lane County area. INET is referring the case for criminal prosecution to the Lane County District Attorney’s Office for prosecution.  Additional information can be obtained by contacting OSP Detective Sergeant Erik Fisher of INET at 541-682-6250, or myself at 541-998-1245.”

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Behind The Badge – DUI Probable Cause Part 1

Behind The Badge – DUI Probable Cause Part 1

Posted on 08 November 2012 by admin

By Kyle Krenik
The Tribune News

JUNCTION CITY OR. – Junction City Police Chief Mark Chase explains probable cause. Probable cause is a key element in any DUI investigation. Police officers are required to follow proper protocol when stopping a vehicle–and that includes having probable cause for the stop.

 

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DUI Probable Cause Part 2

DUI Probable Cause Part 2

Posted on 08 November 2012 by admin

 

By Kyle Krenik
The Tribune News

JUNCTION CITY OR. – Junction City Police Chief Mark Chase explains probable cause. Probable cause is a key element in any DUI investigation. Police officers are required to follow proper protocol when stopping a vehicle–and that includes having probable cause for the stop.

 

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jcschools

JC schools identify school improvements

Posted on 07 November 2012 by admin

Is replacement of the older schools by way of a bond measure the answer?

The JC School District Facilities Director Chris Meyer reports on upgrades and repairs at the four school campuses during monthly school board meetings to keep the board apprised of facility needs in an aging district.

By Vera Westbrook
For the Tribune

JUNCTION CITY – Without a doubt, Junction City schools are old. The JC School District is currently assessing the condition of its four school campuses and identifying necessary improvements.
The district is taking the following steps to prioritize community facility needs, to be responsive to community input and to maintain the district‘s commitment to being fiscally responsible and prudent.
Made up of local citizens, the Facilities Steering Committee reconvened to review and update the findings of a 2008 facilities assessment conducted by gLAs Architectural. It will also identify necessary improvements and funding sources.
In the coming year, the project will rely on guidance from the steering committee and the community through meetings, questionnaires and phone surveys. The district also hired the Angelo Planning Group for long-range planning.
Below are some facts about local schools that led the district to embark on a facility improvements visioning process.
Of the four schools, the high school is the oldest. The east wing was built in 1934 and the west wing was built in 1958. Major renovations were completed between 1966 and 1995, with a 2011 enrollment of 514 students. The next oldest school is Laurel Elementary built in 1955 with a 2011 enrollment of 519.
Built in 1963, Territorial Elementary is the third oldest school in the district with 116 kids enrolled in 2011, while Oaklea Middle School is the newest, built in 1977 with 524 students in 2011. Some schools are so old that many believe building replacement is a viable option, but it may need community funding.
The last bond measure for upgrading school district facilities was passed in 1994 and fully repaid by 2004. To date, JC School District taxpayers pay one of the lowest property tax rates of any district within Lane and Linn counties, with a permanent total tax rate of $4.56 per $1,000 of assessed property value. Depending on community feedback, a tax levy may be a consideration.
Data from the 2008 facilities assessment listed required improvements as architectural needs such as roofs, windows, cabinets, floors, bathrooms, kitchens and media centers; mechanical needs such as heat pumps, ventilation, plumbing and water heaters; and electrical needs such as interior and exterior lighting, clocks, bells and intercoms.
Improvements identified since 2008 included larger classrooms and specialized technology facilities like computer and science labs.
During the facility evaluation process, the project team plans to provide displays and informational materials at community gathering places around town and at local events. District staff will also distribute announcements to families via e-mail, newsletters and flyers.
The school is requesting community input to prioritize improvements through an online survey at the JC School District website at www.junctioncity.k12.or.us.
For more information, contact Facilities Director Chris Meyer at 541.998.6311 ext. 603 or by email at cmeyer@junctioncity.k12.or.us.

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Yes, we can, if we plan

Posted on 07 November 2012 by admin

A 216-unit apartment for moderate income is proposed for the River Road area; the historic heart of the neighborhood

By Carleen Reilly
For the Tribune

RIVER ROAD – The River Road neighbors are learning about a proposal for a 216-apartment moderate-income development by an out-of-state developer. The property is located to the west of River Road on a little less than eight acres of land that is considered to be the historic heart of our neighborhood. The surrounding neighbors have a long list of concerns: height of apartment buildings, how close they are to property boundaries and infringement on neighbors‘ privacy, why 262 parking spaces are planned, how on-site storm water will be managed with so much asphalt and buildings, what landscaping will be used and whether they will refrain from using herbicides, what will happen to the crime rate, how many children will be added to our schools and what impact it will have, whether tax credits will be issued, why urban agricultural land is being developed into residential housing, and whether traffic on River Road and surrounding streets will be hazardous to bikers and pedestrians.
Other layers of concern have also emerged. Neighbors have expectations that they can control what is built in the neighborhood. But it turns out that the developer has met all of the requirements of the Metro Plan and the City of Eugene codes. Because the developer has complied with all the rules, there seems to be no opportunity for neighbors to have a hearing in front of the Planning Commission or the City Council.
Neighbors are suspicious that Eugene is trying to ram this proposal through or that the River Road Community Organization is somehow in league with the City. People are mad at the developer and at the owner of the property. However, it mostly comes down to the fact that over 30 years ago, the property was designated medium-density residential in the Metro Plan and rezoned R-2 in 2008 after a public hearing. This would allow a developer to build up to 326 apartments on this particular parcel if it is used for controlled income and rent projects.
A refinement plan or area plan is needed with codes to define what can and can‘t be built in our neighborhood if we are going to have any control over our destiny. Various opportunities to put in overlay zones or establish codes for our neighborhood have been lost. But we have a new opportunity through Envision Eugene to define our land use with area planning. Eugene is offering area planning help to three neighborhoods.
‘Area Planning,’ as defined in the Envision Eugene recommendation, “considers all the features, natural and built, of special places along key transit corridors and in core commercial areas, to create a vision that fosters vital and sustainable redevelopment in areas with potential to become active centers for living, working, and shopping.”
As the Santa Clara-River Road Outreach and Learning (SCRROL) project transitions to Santa Clara-River Road Implementation Planning Team (SCRRIPT), we are looking for team members to work on our area plans. We may get underway on our long-term future after the first of the year.
It has been said that there are two times the public can contest a land use issue: too early or too late. If we don‘t influence how the rules are made early, it will be too late to change those rules when a specific project is seeking approval.
Early is better. Yes, we can have more control of our neighborhood environment if we plan. If we don‘t plan, we suffer the consequences of others making decisions that affect our lives and our properties for decades.
Get involved by reading the SCRROL Report and Recommendations at www.scrrol.org. For more information, contact Jerry Finigan, SCRROL Chair, at jerry@scrrol.org or Carleen Reilly at carleen@scrrol.org.

Carleen Reilly, Co-Chair
River Road Community Org.
riverroadcommunityorganization@gmail.com

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Burn ban

Burn ban met goals

Posted on 07 November 2012 by admin

State legislation in effect for several years now

Thousands of acres of grass fields line Coburg Road in Harrisburg that can no longer can be managed by natural tools such as fire. Some feel legislation prohibiting field burning has caused more problems than it fixed.

By Vera Westbrook
For the Tribune
TRI-COUNTY – Since a recent ban on agricultural field burning in Lane and most of Linn counties, local residents have been noticing clearer summer skies devoid of smoke plumes bellowing from burning fields. The ban went into effect after the Oregon State Legislature passed Senate Bill 528 in 2009 that prohibits open field burning in the southern Willamette Valley.
Farmers have historically practiced field burning to improve yield and maintain grass purity and to control weeds, insects and plant diseases. In the 1970s, about 500,000 acres of grass seed and cereal grain crops were grown each year in the Willamette Valley—with nearly 250,000 acres burned each summer well into the 1980s. By 2009, the number shrank to 40,000 acres a year.
The 2009 legislation eliminated general open field burning in most of the Willamette Valley with the exception of emergency burning of up to 2,000 acres a year to address disease and pest outbreaks.
Public health was a reason that spurred the legislation. Based on data collected from air quality monitoring stations in the Willamette Valley, the air in several communities contained high levels of fine-particulate pollution from field burning that raised medical concerns. These particles could cause health problems, particularly in the young, the old and those with pre-existing respiratory conditions.
Oregon Department of Agriculture Smoke Management Program Manager John Byers, who oversees the burning of 15,000 acres of certain fire-dependent grasses and of the 15,000 acres allowed, only 11,000 acres were burned this year, and no one has applied for emergency burning.
Sally Markos, public affairs manager for the Lane Regional Air Protection Agency, sees other signs of a successful legislation.
“What we look at is the number of complaints the agency receives. During some summers, we had more than 500 formal complaints. Now we are down to a trickle.” Markos said previous complaints were direct impacts where field-burning smoke was coming into neighborhoods, entering homes, and causing people to breathe the smoke.
Markos further explains that measuring particulate matter in the air is not an accurate determinant of the effectiveness of the legislation.
“If there is a field burning intrusion, it is only for a few hours on one day, so you would see a spike (in particles) on that day, but it’s not going to change the averages for that period of time.” Particulate measurements also lack the source of particles.
The results of Senate Bill 528 may be favorable for some, but for local farmers, it’s presented a new set of challenges.
“Fields that were once burned within a few minutes are having tractors dragged over them for days,” said Eric Bowers of Bashaw Land and Seed in Harrisburg. “We also have more insect problems that we didn’t have before,” especially with slugs.
“Fire was the natural way to take care of most of these problems, and they’ve taken that tool away from us,” he said. “Now we’re burning more diesel and creating more dust.”
For more information see the websites below:
ODA Natural Resources Smoke Management Program -  www.oregon.gov/ODA/NRD/pages/smokefrontpage.aspx
Lane Regional Air Protection Agency   -  www.lrapa.org

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11.07.12 Museum-Wall pic

Military history at Monroe Museum

Posted on 07 November 2012 by admin

Artifacts donated by the family of Eugene Davidson of Alpine who was drafted into the Army in 1941 during WWII. He participated in the death march carrying the items in the photo in his pack. He then spent three and a half years in a prisoner of war camp in the Pacific. While in prison he built coffins and did other carpentry. The uniform in the photo (left) also belonged to Davidson.

The South Benton Community Museum in Monroe offers a comprehensive section on Military history which includes information, photos and displays on veterans from as far back as the Civil and the Indian Wars. The display and files on individuals is organized and compiled by Sheila Myers. The museum is open Wednesdays from 1-4pm and the last Saturday of the month from 10am-4pm.

A wall in the military section of the Monroe Museum contains photographs of veterans from the nearby communities – some who gave their lives and some who made it back.

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navy1944

An unsolved mystery

Posted on 07 November 2012 by admin

WWII vet sees unexplained explosion of naval ship

submitted photo
Barbara Wright and George Horning

Official Navy photo
The USS Mount Hood is a naval ammunition ship that suffered annihilation during an explosion on Nov. 10, 1944 off the coast of New Guinea.

By Vera Westbrook
For the Tribune
TRI-COUNTY – Some disasters occur with no known explanation. Monroe veteran George Horning saw one such disaster during WWII, adding to the list of war stories that should be retold, especially on Veterans Day.
Born in Corvallis, George, 88, is part owner of Horning Farms located north of Monroe. He’s a member of the Monroe Veterans of Foreign Wars (VFW) and is still married to his high school sweetheart, Eleanor. He’s also a father of six.
George’s WWII story began in September of 1942 after he enlisted in the Navy where he trained as a torpedoman and spent about a year and a half overseas.
“We boarded the Dutch troop ship the MS Brastagi in San Francisco,” George said, and headed for a naval camp near the native village of Gamadodo in Milne Bay on islands northeast of Papua New Guinea, where his war story took place.
George doesn’t have any combat experience to speak of, but, “I witnessed the explosion of the USS Mount Hood at Manus Island on Nov. 10, 1944,” he said, in the Admiralty Islands near New Guinea. The entire ship and crew were obliterated, except for 18 men who left for shore that morning. The cause of the explosion is still unknown today.
The USS Mount Hood, an ammunition ship commissioned just four months prior to her destruction, arrived in Seeadler Harbor on Manus Island in Sept. 1944. There she dispensed ammunition and explosives to ships preparing for the Philippine offensive. Horning was on another ship in the same harbor on the morning of the disaster.
“We were playing Cribbage on deck when we heard the first explosion; we barely had time to look before the big bang took place,” George said. “We had a lot of shrapnel hitting all over and I received a cut on my right arm just below the shoulder.”
The largest remaining piece of the USS Mount Hood recovered was a 16×10 foot piece of the hull found on the ocean floor. Some 321 crewmen were killed. About 3,600 tons of explosives were on board. Several hundred individuals on about 20 neighboring ships also died. Many vessels were destroyed or damaged.
Georg’s ship was set to sail that morning but was held over for another day until all the seams were checked and the ship was declared seaworthy.
The cause of the explosion is still unknown, but one naval report said the possibility of enemy action was remote and that the most probable cause of the accident was rough handling of ammunition while loading and unloading.
Years later, while getting a haircut at a Monroe barber shop, George discovered that his barber, Laverne Albin, had also experienced the USS Mount Hood explosion while serving as a radioman on a destroyer in Seeadler Harbor.
Please remember to honor our veterans on Veterans Day, as stories like this wouldn’t exist without them. For a historical account, photos and a synopsis of the naval investigation, visit www.ussrainier.com/mthood.html.

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Demo in sustainability

A demonstration of sustainability

Posted on 07 November 2012 by admin

The Monroe Sharing Garden provides ample food for those in need without government or private grants

Volunteers helped harvest and prepare meals for the Farm to Farm fundraiser earlier this fall. From left on bottom are Dan Blaustein-Rejto and Danielle Walker. In back from left are Gini Bramlett, Linda Sebring and Christine Musacchio.

By Llyn Peabody
For the Tribune

MONROE – The Sharing Gardens project demonstrates an efficient way of growing food that is light on the Earth, builds community and provides ample surplus for those in need. We have steered away from seeking large government or private grants because in order to be sustainable we must demonstrate that this type of garden can thrive through the support and participation of the community in which it is embedded. This year has been a fantastic demonstration of these principles in action.
Garden expenses for the 2012 season were just under $2,800. This included gas and upkeep for the farm truck, materials for a 12‘x40‘ greenhouse, as well as other garden-growing basics. With Chris‘ and my living expenses, which are also covered by the project, the total comes to $13,700. With these financial resources we were able to grow (on a piece of land 110‘ x170‘) more than 30 varieties of vegetables. Our top ten producers yielded just less than 6,200 pounds of food, and more than 500 heads of lettuce, which had a market value of $15,800!
This food has gone to feed people at four charities in the area, the volunteers and other contributors all free of charge. Because we are growing food in such volumes, many of our volunteers have canned and dried food for winter storage as well.
The gardens would have cost much more to operate if it weren‘t for the community support we have received in materials donations, tools and equipment, trailers/RV‘s we fixed up and re-sold, and countless volunteer hours (our core group of gardeners each gave 3-5 hours weekly). We are grateful too that many people have offered their grapes, apples and nuts to glean and share. The project has also received many cash donations ranging from $20 to $3,000.
As we look to the 2013 season, we‘re excited about a growing partnership with the United Methodist Church adjacent to the gardens. It looks like we‘ll be cooperating on a series of classes, movie nights and potlucks meant to inspire and educate

people about healthy eating, food preservation, organic gardening and other relevant topics.
We continue to be thankful to the Crowson family for the use of the land and water on their property in Monroe. We are exploring the idea of expanding the garden site to include more winter storage crops such as squash and potatoes and to expand the existing orchard area to include figs, berries and more apples and plums. We may also build a second greenhouse.
Let us know if you would like to participate in any way. We can always use more donations of cash, building materials, tools, garden supplies, leaves and hay (either to expand the existing site or spawn some new sites in surrounding communities.)
Contact us at ShareInJoy@gmail.com, 541.847.8797 or
www.theSharingGardens.blogspot.com.

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Wetlands

City’s take on wetland issue

Posted on 07 November 2012 by admin

JC staff and officials expound on local wetland regulations

Photo provided by google maps
JC staff and most officials feel comfortable about their recommendation to place partial wetland protection on three ditches running through town. Some feel it’s for the good of the people, but some don’t.

By Vera Westbrook
For the Tribune

JUNCTION CITY – Local residents have voiced their disapproval of the city council’s decision to add local regulation of three canals running through town that were part of a wetland inventory in JC’s 20-year Comprehensive Plan update. But city staff and planning commissioners still feel their recommendation for some protection is valid.
City Planner Stacy Clauson’s reasoning for recommending additional city regulation of wetlands to already existing state regulations is because the state requires local protection of locally significant wetlands, as presented in statewide goals.
Goal 5 states, “Local governments shall adopt programs that will protect natural resources . . . for present and future generations.” View the goal online at www.oregon.gov/LCD/docs/goals/goal5.pdf.
To comply, JC updated its Comprehensive Plan with a local wetland inventory, which gives cities some flexibility in allowing uses that conflict with the resource if well-supported findings exist.
“JC policymakers decided to allow some conflicting uses, such as roads, utilities, flood control and maintenance and repair to existing structures within the wetland, but limited other types of development, such as new construction or filling in the wetland, that would have negative consequences to the wetlands and to surrounding properties,” Clauson said.
Although the state already has rules about wetlands, the city passed an additional wetland overlay district to protect the canals’ ability to convey stormwaters.
To make some changes, property owners might have to consult with the Department of State Lands (DSL) and the Army Corps of Engineers. The city said it would be happy to partner with property owners in making those changes, but some requests could still be denied.
“A culvert built in the canals would be difficult to build as it would likely interfere with the stormwater functionality and wetlands within the guidelines set by DSL,” City Administrator Kevin Watson said. “But technically, it could be done if engineering said it could be done.”
Planning Commissioner Jeff Haag agreed with local regulation and believes the commission gave more rights to landowners by removing the 20-foot overlay and moving the setback to the crest of the ditch. He also added that the city did not create the wetlands. They were taken off existing aerial photographs and were already there.
“We didn’t want anybody to lose any property rights at all, and by allowing some local protection, it actually allows people to do more with their property than having no local protection,” he said. “Nothing really changed, as all the existing uses are still permitted. You can’t build within the waterway no matter what, and the city has nothing to do with that.”
But not all councilor’s agreed with the council’s decision to control councilors Jack Sumner and Bill DiMarco voting in favor of removing city control over the canals.
“I didn’t think we needed more control over something that was already controlled by a state and federal agency,” Sumner said. “The city council didn’t listen to the people, but its’ the city council’s right to do so—it’s called government—you don’t always get what you want for the people.”
The city submitted its Comprehensive Plan to the county for approval with a public hearing scheduled with Lane County Commissioners on Dec. 4.

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Honoring WWII Veterans

Honoring WWII Veterans

Posted on 07 November 2012 by admin

Monroe veteran, Barbara Wright traveled to D.C. on Willamette Valley’s first ever Honor Flight

submitted photo
Barbara Wright from Monroe stands in front of the Women’s Memorial in Washington, D.C. She served in the US Coast Guard during WWII and visited the recently constructed memorial last month with other veterans on an Honor Flight.

By Gini Bramlett
For the Tribune

Thanks to a Eugene Company called CBT Nuggets, WWII Coast Guard Veteran, Barbara Wright of Monroe, boarded a Southwest Airline flight to Washington D.C. in mid October to visit the WWII Memorial along with other WWII Veterans. The national program is called Honor Flight and it gives WWII Veterans – the remaining in their late 80s and 90s – the opportunity to see the monument that was built to honor their service with no cost to them.
“I went in remembrance of all those who I served with in the Coast Guard, of school mates and friends,” said Wright, who serves as director of the Monroe Museum. “There were 15 casualties from the Monroe area. The trip revived those memories.”
The Honor Flight is offered for no cost to WWII Veterans and a ‘guardian’ if needed. The funding comes from private donations. Forty states have now sent Honor Flights to Washington, D.C., but this was the first time for the Willamette Valley.
Actually, two Honor Flights left the Portland Airport last month. The second was as a result of the surprise personal contribution from CBT Nuggets which included Wright and a guardian, along with 24 other veterans, some with guardians, as well. The company not only financed the trip, but sent along two of its employees to assist. If not for that surprise donation, Wright would have had to wait until spring.
“The sacrifices, the honor they gave, and then to think there’s never really been a chance to say thank you to them,” said CBT Nuggets CEO Dan Charbonneau. The donation was $30,000 to cover airfare, transportation and hotels for 25 veterans.
Among the group, only three were women, including Barbara Wright, USCG SPAR, 89, from Monroe; Betty Henderson, US Navy WAVE, 88, from Eugene; and Elizabeth Booth, Navy Nurse, 95, also from Eugene.
While in D.C. the group of 50 veterans – some with guardians– visited the Korean Memorial, Vietnam Memorial and Women’s Memorial along with the WWII Memorial which was built only recently.
“The WWII Memorial is magnificent,” said Wright. “You can’t imagine the grandeur. You must see it to really appreciate it.”
The group was also privileged to be in Arlington National Cemetery to see the Changing of the Guard at the Tomb of the Unknown, a solemn and reverend event.
“Once we entered Arlington Cemetery, they ask that you remain silent,” said Wright. “It ended with the changing of the guard, a new wreath is placed and the playing of taps, a very emotional event.”
More than 300,000 are buried in Arlington which includes veterans from all the wars.
Wright said they were treated like royalty starting with a banquet at the Shiloh Inn in Portland the evening before the Honor Flights left to special meals and bag lunches the hotel sent along when they toured the monuments.
“When we arrived in Chicago, I looked out the window and there was a fire engine riding along side of us,” said Wright. “They sprayed our plane with water cannons. When we arriving in the airport there were hundreds of people lined up to greet us. They clapped, thanked us and shook our hands. It was overwhelming, and again, very emotional.”
And, it happened all over again when the flights arrived in Washington, D.C. and again on their return flight in Portland.
“I wish all those occupiers and dissenters could go to Washington, D.C. and see Arlington Cemetery and the over 300,000 who have sacrificed to give them the right to be who they are,” said Wright. “Also to meet those old people on the trip and hear their stories.”
Wright urges interested WWII Veterans to contact Mike Pungercar, organizer for the South Willamette Valley Honor Flight to get their names on the list for future flights. To contact him, call 541.746.3469 or email pungercar2@msn.com.

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