Archive | January, 2013

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Talent In Town

Posted on 25 January 2013 by admin

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Viking Sal holds winter concert featuring opera singer
By Vera Westbrook
JUNCTION CITY – The Friends of Viking Sal not only supports the local senior center, but its upcoming winter concert aims to expose the community to world-renowned talent.
At 3pm this Sunday, Jan. 27, the concert will feature a local singer coupled with instrumentals at an annual fundraiser and membership drive. The concert will be followed by a reception with refreshments, held at the United First Methodist Church on 750 W. 10th Ave.
Featured talent will be the internationally acclaimed voice of Pastor Brennen Guillory of Junction City’s Faith Lutheran Church as well as professional pianist and University of Oregon doctoral candidate Vincent Centeno, who will also accompany Pastor Guillory.
The Rev. Guillory has become known for his powerful, dramatic voice and thoughtful interpretations of both operatic and concert music.  As a tenor, he has sung internationally on the opera stage in places like London, England, and Toronto, Canada. He has played various roles in operas such as Carmen, Fidelio and La Traviata.
Since becoming a pastor in 2006, Rev. Guillory has focused his efforts in the concert hall, recently performing as an opera soloist with the Beaverton Symphony Orchestra. He will be singing a collection of show tunes and classical tunes at the concert.
On Sunday, not only will guests enjoy the sounds of an exceptional vocalist, but they’ll also be helping the local senior center.
The Friends of Viking Sal began about three years ago to reach out to local residents of all ages. The membership drive is held annually to encourage local residents to become members, not a time-intensive commitment. The entire community is invited to become involved in the fundraiser, not just seniors and Friends.
“The purpose of the Friends is to supplement funds through membership fees, fundraising and gifts,” said Marcia Scalise, program lead at the Viking Sal Senior Center. “As generations change, the Friends will be looking into the future of Viking Sal.”
The Friends consist of about 40 members who contribute varying levels of donations that begin at $25 annually. The Board of the Friends of the Viking Sal Senior Center meets quarterly to plan for fundraisers and projects to improve the place. Participation as a Friend is encouraged but not required beyond donations.
“We are inviting younger people to become interested, to participate in planning and to carry this on into the future,” Scalise said, “giving younger people an opportunity to plan for the future of Viking Sal.”
Funds raised by the Friends will be allocated for programming, long- and short-term projects and also for a future senior center facility accommodating future population growth.
To sample the classical church and opera voices of Rev. Brennen Guillory, visit a video on the Internet titled ‘The Two Voices of Rev. Brennen Guillory’ accessible on www.Youtube.com.
Tickets are $10 per person and are available at the Viking Sal Senior Center located on 245 W. 5th Ave. or through any Friends of Viking Sal board members or at the door. The concert is open to the public.

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JC Industry Expands

Posted on 25 January 2013 by admin

Community ponders construction on Hwy. 99 south
By Vera Westbrook
JUNCTION CITY – Several large cement tanks located a short distance north of the Department of Corrections property on Hwy. 99 south of Junction City have been attracting attention from local observers. Project engineer Dean Foor of JC Biomethane, the biogas plant building the tanks, was contacted for project specifics.
The second tank—the tallest of the four tanks visible from the highway—is nearly complete, Foor said. Excavation began in the fall of 2011 with continuous tank construction occurring since June 2012.
Tank number two is an insulated concrete structure with a steel exterior that’s light grey in color. It’s about 60-feet tall by approximately 45-feet in diameter. The walls are up and roofing will begin in about two weeks. The other tanks are either built or still being built.
Construction may be new, but the company is not. “The compost yard has been there for multiple years,” Foor said, with the company leasing the land from Lane Forest Products. This biogas plant project is independent of the composting operation. Biogas technology is relatively new to the U.S., but quite prevalent in Europe.
This biogas plant comes with an interesting story about its two technologies: anaerobic digestion and energy recovery.
It begins with organic material that is degraded by bacteria in an oxygen-free environment. “In our case, the organic material that we are digesting or fermenting is post-consumer food waste,” Foor said, in addition to waste straw and dairy manure fibers.“We’ll receive about 100 cubic meters a day of this blended material.”
All this is routed into the first of the four tanks. The first tank, which is already built, will contain four days worth of blended food waste. This first concrete tank , about 1-foot in thickness, is known as the ‘mix tank’ and is 600 cubic meters in size. After the residue is done in this tank, it moves to the second tank—the tallest tank now under construction.
The second concrete tank is 4,500 cubic meters in size and functions as a ‘digester,’ which digests the residue for about 30 days. It then moves to the third tank. The third tank is behind the second tank and is in the beginning stages.
“The foundation is prepared and the concrete for that will start in another week or two,” Foor said.
Tank three will be known as the ‘post digester,’ a 3,500-cubic-meter concrete tank. On top of this tank will sit an additional 3,000-cubic-meter biogas storage tank made of double membrane flexible PVC.
Anaerobic digestion generates this methane-rich biogas to fuel energy recovery via a 16-cylinder engine, “which combusts the gas that we generate and turns a turbine and creates electricity, which is sold to utility companies,” Foor said. The utilities involved are Blachley-Lane, the Bonneville Power Administration and Portland General Electric.
Meanwhile, the solids will be removed from the residue between tanks three and four, sending the completed liquid product know as ‘digestate’ to tank four— a storage tank also under construction. Reinforcements are currently being placed consisting of iron bars inside of concrete. The fourth tank will be a 9,000-cubic-meter storage tank.
After tank four, the digestate will be used for land applications to replace about 1,000 acres of commercial fertilizer that’s compatible with organic agriculture.
“Construction will continue until June,” Foor said, with the new plant creating about 10 new jobs.

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Water Rates Increase

Water Rates Increase

Posted on 25 January 2013 by admin

SONY DSCA decrease in water usage prompts council to look at rates

By Vera Westbrook
JUNCTION CITY – Several factors have prompted the city council to approve a resolution increasing the water rate for Junction City residents.
First and foremost among the reasons for the increase, “is the reduction of water usage and sales the city has experienced over the past few years,” said JC Public Works Director Jason Knope at a Jan. 8 city council meeting.
He proposed a 4 percent increase to the base water rate and a 10 percent increase to the consumption charge, resulting in a base rate increase from $9.70 to $10.09 and a consumption charge increase from $2.20 to $2.42 per unit.
In 2008 and 2009, the city was selling about 300 million gallons of water annually, decreasing to 171 million gallons at the end of 2012. Less water usage also impacts the sewer budget, since sewer is based on water usage. This continued conservation is causing issues with the water and sewer budgets.
Based on revenue projections, the amounts budgeted for transfer into the Water System Improvement Fund and the Sewer System Improvement Fund were significantly higher than what they should be. After the reduction in the transfer amount, no shortfall existed in the sewer fund, so sewer rates needed no adjustment.
But a shortfall did exist in the water fund. Of the $175,000 shortfall in the water fund for this fiscal year, staff has identified changes and cuts for about $150,000. Raising city water rates served as a solution for the remainder of the shortfall, as the last time the city raised water rates was in January 2010.
After a review of several rate increase options, the lowest option— a 4 percent base and 10 percent consumption increase—served the immediate needs of the city at this time.
“What staff has looked at is trying to come up with the most minimum impact that we could,” Knope said. “The proposed rate increase would generate approximately $26,000 within the next six months of this fiscal year,” which would bridge the gap.
Councilor Jim Leach was uneasy approving a water rate increase without seeing any benefit to the city water system, and said, “I don’t mind voting for a raise, but I can’t handle a raise until we have a plan in action,”  to better city water.
Knope responded that starting next month the Treatment Stakeholder Subcommittee will be addressing the water treatment project and the sewer project, with a recommendation packet for the city council in fall.
The councilors voted unanimously to approve a resolution to raise the city water rates as proposed by Director Knope effective Jan. 21, 2013.

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JCPD GETS TWO USED CHARGERS

Posted on 25 January 2013 by admin

By Kyle Krenik
JUNCTION CITY – Junction City Police Department (JCPD) recently purchased two used 2010 Dodge charger patrol cars saving the city $93,000.
“This was a great opportunity. We were able to purchase our police radios and the radars for the cars on Federal grants that will be at no cost to our local budget. Each car cost us $7500. If we were to just buy the video recording system and light bar package new, not even counting the car, we would spend approximately the same amount,” JCPD Chief Mark Chase said.
“It is important that we continue to look for these opportunities to save our community money, while at the same time getting the equipment officers need to provide exceptional public safety services,“ Chase said.

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To Lane County Residents

Posted on 25 January 2013 by admin

From Thomas M. Turner
TurnerColorSmallforWebLane County Sheriff
The Sandy Hook shooting has prompted many recent discussions regarding gun control in the United States.  Our own state of Oregon suffered a shooting at Clackamas Town Center in the Portland area last December and many of us remember with great clarity the murder of Officer Chris Kilcullen in April of 2011, and the Thurston High School shooting that occurred over a decade ago, killing four and injuring more than 20.
In response to Lane County residents’ many inquiries, I wanted to provide you with my stance on the issue.
As the Sheriff of Lane County, I have taken an oath to uphold the Constitution of the United States and the laws of the State of Oregon.  I have upheld that oath for 31 years as a law enforcement officer in our community.  While I understand the sense of urgency on behalf of citizens, I believe that any reaction, decision or response to issues that impact the rights of all people should be done so without haste and after careful consideration.  Ultimately it is the Supreme Court, not any individual, that determines the constitutionality of any law.
As a member of the law enforcement community, I am supportive of our lawmakers evaluating the recent tragedies and engaging in discussions on how we can avoid the loss of more lives in the future.  It would be irresponsible if we didn’t consider ways in which to make our Country safer.  As law enforcement providers, we are tasked with conserving the peace and ensuring preservation of life.
As the details of the President‘s proposal emerge over the coming days, there will be many discussions on whether improvements can be made to increase public safety while upholding the Constitution and following the laws of our Country.
I remain committed to the preservation of the law, to the protection of life, and to you as residents of Lane County.  We will continue to work together as a country, and as a county, to make our home a safer place to live.
Our primary focus here in Lane County needs to be on strengthening our failing public safety system.  We must continue to work together to make Lane County a safer place to live.  As your Sheriff, I ask for your support.

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High School Basketball Weekly Wrap Up

Posted on 25 January 2013 by admin

By Kyle Krenik
Junction City Boys
Jan. 11 the Junction City Tigers boy’s basketball team lost Friday‘s away conference game against Sweet Home by a score of 59-37. Jan. 15 the Tigers won Tuesday‘s home conference game against Elmira by a score of 42-40. Jan 18 the Tigers basketball team lost Friday‘s away conference game against Sisters by a score of 42-27.
Junction City Girls
Jan. 11 the Junction City Tigers girl’s basketball team won Friday‘s away conference game against Sweet Home by a score of 63-23. Jan. 15 the Tigers won Tuesday‘s home conference game against Elmira by a score of 51-37. Jan. 18 the Tigers team won Friday‘s away conference game against Sisters by a score of 42-26.
North Eugene Boys
Jan. 10 North Eugene Highlanders boy’s basketball team lost Thursday‘s home non-conference game against Thurston by a score of 54-41. Jan. 15 the Highlanders team lost Tuesday‘s away conference game against Springfield by a score of 72-34. Jan. 17 the Highlanders lost Thursday‘s away conference game against Willamette by a score of 69-32.
North Eugene Girls
Jan. 11 the North Eugene Highlanders girl’s basketball team won Friday‘s away non-conference game against Thurston by a score of 42-22. Jan 15 the Highlanders team lost Tuesday‘s home conference game against Springfield by a score of 84-30. Jan. 18 the Highlanders lost Friday‘s home conference game against Willamette by a score of 49-20.
Harrisburg Boys
Jan. 11 the Harrisburg Eagles boy’s basketball team won Friday‘s home conference game against Chemawa Indian by a score of 60-37. Jan. 15 the Eagles won Tuesday‘s away conference game against Salem Academy by a score of 61-44. Jan. 18 Harrisburg lost Friday‘s home conference game against Blanchet Catholic by a score of 58-46.
Harrisburg Girls
Jan. 11 the Harrisburg Eagles girl’s basketball team won Friday‘s home conference game against Chemawa Indian by a score of 36-30. Jan. 15 the Eagles won Tuesday‘s away conference game against Salem Academy by a score of 38-34.
Monroe Boys
Jan. 15 the Dragons lost Tuesday‘s neutral conference game against Oakridge by a score of 39-29. Jan. 18 the Dragons won Friday‘s home conference game against Riddle/Riddle Education Center by a score of 47-39.
Monroe Girls
Jan. 15 the Monroe Dragons girl’s basketball team won Tuesday‘s neutral conference game against Oakridge by a score of 47-28. Jan 18 the Dragons won Friday‘s home conference game against Riddle/Riddle Education Center by a score of 33-32. Jan 19 the Dragons won Saturday‘s home conference game against North Douglas by a score of 33-30.

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Junction City Gymnastics Places 2nd in Hawaii Meet

Posted on 25 January 2013 by admin

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By Aleisha Johnson

JUNCTION CITY – Amanda Larsen, 14, is a freshman at Willamette High School.  In addition to dancing ballet, playing softball, and being highly involved in her church and youth group in Junction City, this joyful and disciplined teen is a proficient gymnast.
At the Gymnastics in Paradise meet in Oahu, Hawaii, Jan. 11-13, Amanda placed 2nd in All-Around Competition in the 14 year old, Level 9 bracket.  Amanda competed with her team from Gymnastics Northwest against gymnasts from Alaska, California, Hawaii, Oregon, Washington, Australia & New Zealand.

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When The Going Gets Tough

Posted on 18 January 2013 by admin

Lane County sees optimism in the New Year

By Vera WestbrookFor the Tribune
LANE COUNTY – Improvements in the economy, public health and public safety were among the topics discussed at Lane County’s state of the county address presented on January 7.
But first, the newly elected incumbent officials were sworn in—Sheriff Thomas Turner and Commissioner Pete Sorenson—as was the newest elected official, Commissioner Pat Farr. Farr will replace Rob Handy for District 4 in North Eugene. The following 2012 Lane County facts were also presented.
The 2012 storm that flooded Mapleton and the Mohawk Valley was one of the worst in Lane County history. A tight 2012 budget encouraged staff, particularly public safety, to use volunteers efficiently to make the county a better place.
In spring, the county launched into Oregon’s health care transformation leading the state in the development of  coordinated care organizations, like Trillium CCO, to improve public health while assisting some 55,000 county members on the  Oregon health plan.
Improvements to the local economy included Lane County declaring 300 acres of industrial land in Goshen, the first area to be designated in Oregon as a regionally significant industrial area. The county now has large sites available for big companies, coupled with freeway and rail access.
County health also increased immunizations countywide through efforts such as vaccination clinics to decrease preventable diseases.  And since 2000, Lane County still continues to lead the state in recycling, with a recovery rate of 61.5, which is higher than the Portland metro rate.
Board chair Commissioner Sid Leiken presented the following key points in the state of the county address.
“With impending county-wide budget cuts, we had to find ways to curtail spending while inventing new creative revenue sources,” Leiken said, by adapting and facing challenges for years to come. “As a result, the Lane County that you see before you is better prepared, better equipped and more poised for success than ever before.”
Noting that the county’s resilience resulted from insufficient planning for cuts in timber revenue, he said, “We are a community that does not back down from our challenges.” Leiken also pointed out that health is what makes this community livable—health of the economy, health of people and health of public safety.
He said the county is increasing its focus on improving maternal and infant health with more home visits. Larger community health clinics are also located in Eugene and Springfield. The health department also applied for a grant to increase the rate of county immunizations by 10 percent.
“We found ways to do more with less,” he said, and “the board of commissioners is aggressively looking at both short and long term solutions to our public safety challenges.”
In closing, Leiken said, “I ask that we as a community bind together and form a force that no economic hardship, no great recession and no fiscal cliff can ever take down.”

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Transit looking good

Posted on 18 January 2013 by admin

Harrisburg looks further into a shuttle service to JCBy Vera Westbrook
For the Tribune
HARRISBURG – After reviewing the results of a recent transit survey, the city council directed city staff to continue looking into the possibility of establishing a shuttle service between Junction City and Harrisburg.
“We are pleased at the amount of interest expressed in having some kind of shuttle service,” City Administrator Bruce Cleeton said, “and based upon that interest, we’ll pursue it further and start dealing with the biggest obstacle, which is figuring out how to fund a project like this.”
During previous meetings with Lane Transit District (LTD), Cleeton said representatives indicated that grant assistance may be available, so Cleeton plans to investigate that option.
“We have a ways to go before we can make this happen,” Cleeton warns.
The survey was mailed to Harrisburg residents enclosed in the city utility bill at the end of October. It was also distributed among tenants in apartments and mobile home parks, and was accessible from the city website.
Results of the survey were based on 100 responders, with 95 people expressing interest in the shuttle. Five responders opposed the idea because of costs.
“At this point we do not know if there will be costs to the city,” Cleeton said. “If we can get a grant to get it going, it could be that if there’s enough interest in a service like this, it could potentially be self supporting.”
Cleeton provided the city council with the following survey results at the January 9 meeting.
Half of the respondents said they would use the service to travel to Junction City. The other half said they would use the service to travel to Eugene/Springfield. On average, riders would be using the shuttle for 12 round-trip rides per month.
The reasons submitted to use the shuttle/bus service were to save money, to access services not available in Harrisburg and to commute to work.
The most popular times requested to connect to an LTD bus going to Eugene were 8am, noon and 6:30pm. The least popular times were 6pm, 5pm and 6:30am.
The most popular times to connect with a shuttle going from Junction City to Harrisburg were 3pm 5pm and 6pm. The least popular times were 6:30am and 8am.
Ridership was determined to be constant on weekdays, but declined to 50 percent on Saturdays. Thirteen responders said they, or someone in their household, used a wheelchair or had a disability affecting their use of a shuttle.
The following were costs riders found reasonable for a one-way fare: 27 responders suggested one dollar or less; 32 would pay $2-$3; five were willing to pay $4 or more; and one person was willing to pay $15.
Assuming 90 riders per month made 12 round trips at $2 each way, $4,320 in revenue would be generated.
Cleeton will be looking into various options including leasing a shuttle van with the possibility of volunteers running the service.
For more information about the transit service, contact City Administrator Bruce Cleeton at Harrisburg City Hall at 541.995.6655.

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Neighborhood Longevity and Disaster Survival Rates

Posted on 18 January 2013 by admin

By Carleen Reilly
For The Tribune News
How would you like to increase the likelihood of everyone in the neighborhood surviving a disaster and also increase the lifespan of everyone in the neighborhood by 5 years? All we have to do is have “small commercial establishments that draw people out of their homes and into public life.”
An amazing story on National Public Radio* reported about a massive heat wave in 1995 in two next-door neighborhoods, where 33 people per hundred thousand died in one neighborhood and 3 people per hundred thousand died in the other. These neighborhoods were matched on all the factors that you might think would make a difference, but the one that mattered was whether there were businesses where the elderly enjoyed meeting and greeting one another in the course of pursuing the purchases of daily life. As a byproduct of this joy of living, the life expectancy of the neighborhood with lots of public interaction increased by five years over the other neighborhood. You can look it up on the website for the interesting details.
This story provoked thoughts of our own River Road neighborhood. What are the small businesses that will draw our residents out to develop social connections? Where are our businesses located? Are there enough of them in the right places? How do we attract the businesses we want and need in order to buy local? How will we address the needs of young college graduates who will rent the new energy-efficient apartments recently built? They will want lively places with music and good food. How about the needs of families with children in the new affordable housing apartments going up? They will need easy access to reasonably priced goods and services and good availability of healthy food choices.
I have lived in a half-dozen neighborhoods, and most of them were just struggling to survive. I would like to live in a neighborhood that thrives. River Roaders yearn to attract businesses that will bake our bread, sell us hardware, and provide us healthy groceries that are locally grown. This is not just a discretionary effort—something that we would enjoy. It is a key to survival and longevity.
Some of our neighbors are seeking to create a neighborhood destination in the heart of River Road. An architect told a neighbor that it really bugged him that there is no place to walk to, to gather and feel a sense of community there.‘ But I believe that our neighbors might be willing to work together to attract these businesses if we realized that it is the difference between surviving and thriving.
Other keys to building a neighborhood for thriving are having transportation alternatives with auto, bus rapid transit, and safe bicycle and pedestrian paths; comprehensive parks and recreational activities and spaces for gathering like Emerald Park and the River Road Annex, and churches and schools that serve our needs for community and work toward the common good.
If you are interested in the future of River Road, then join the February 11 meeting of the River Road Community Organization to learn more about the work of planning our neighborhood. We would welcome you at 7:00 p.m. at the River Road Annex, 1055 River Road.
Carleen Reilly, Co-Chair River Road Community Organization riverroadcommunityorganization@gmail.com
*Neighborhood Connections Key to Surviving a Crisis. (National Public Radio, Jan. 3, 2013). Steve Inskeep interviews Eric Kleinenberg about his article “Adaptations” published in The New Yorker. http://www.npr.org/2013/01/03/168509385/neighborhood-connections-key-to-surving-a-crisis

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Emerald PUD Board Elects 2013 Officers, Swears in Board Members

Posted on 18 January 2013 by admin

By Amber Fossen
Emerald People‘s Utility District
At the first meeting of 2013, Emerald People’s Utility District Board members were sworn in.  Attorney Rick Larson performed the swearing in ceremony.  Recently elected Directors Ron Davis, Katherine Schacht, and Penny Jordan were sworn in as well as appointed Director Kevin Parrish.
The Board of Directors also elected their 2013 officers:  Penny Jordan will serve as President, Kevin Parrish as Vice President, and Katherine Schacht as Treasurer.
The Board of Directors holds their business meetings at 5:30 p.m. on the second Tuesday of each month and a Board workshop at 1 p.m. on the fourth Tuesday; meeting times are subject to change.  Meetings are held at District Headquarters and open to the public.  Public comment is welcome at the business meetings each month.
The regularly scheduled January meeting has been moved due to a scheduling conflict.  The 4th Tuesday workshop has been moved to January 29 at 1 p.m.
For more information on Board contact information, meeting schedules, agendas, and minutes visit www.epud.org.

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Allie Heller, placed 2nd in the 200 IM

Posted on 18 January 2013 by admin

Margaret McKenney
For The Tribune News

Photo By: Eryne Grant Photography

Photo By: Eryne Grant Photography

Allie Heller, placed 2nd in the 200 IM behind teammates Kailee King.  Allie helped in her other events, by getting 3rd in the 100 free behind teammates, Lydia Fish and Madie Priaulx. She then swam on the North “B” relays in the 200 Free relay (getting 2nd) and the 400 Free relay (getting 3rd) so as to help North Eugene win easily over visiting Springfield team on Friday 1/11/13. Full results on www.facebook.com/NEWatersports

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State Hospital A Go

State Hospital A Go

Posted on 18 January 2013 by admin

City officials take oath of office after the New Year
By Vera Westbrook
For the Tribune
JUNCTION CITY – It was business as usual after the newly elected city officials took the oath of office at the first city council meeting of the year on January 8.
Incumbent officials were Mayor David Brunscheon and Councilors Laurel Crenshaw, Randy Nelson and Bill DiMarco; Councilor Karen Leach was sworn in to take the place of Councilor Jack Sumner. Nelson was appointed council president.
Oregon State Hospital Replacement Project administrator Jodie Jones also Attended the meeting to present a construction update on the state hospital project taking place on the Department of Corrections property south of Junction City on Hwy. 99.
“There’s a nice big gravel pad out there and they are getting ready to rework that,” Jones said. And furthermore, “We recently put out a $10- to $15-million bid package that will start doing a lot of the ground-work structure that we need to do,” which includes re-grading the building pad.
Starting next week, once electrical and plumbing contractors are selected, deep underground electrical and data will be worked on, as well as the site water and fire lines. Contractor bids are still being reviewed.
Starting Monday, the project will begin receiving foundation concrete bids. On the following Thursday, the project will begin receiving structural steel bids.
“You’ll start seeing a whole lot of activity going on out there,” Jones said.
Trailers have also been moved on site, which house offices for project administrators, like Jones who’s there most Wednesdays, and for Hoffman Construction personnel, the main contractor for the entire project. contractor for the entire project.
What opened the flood gates for the project was that “the mental health hospital was included in the governor’s recommended budget,” Jones said, “so that puts us one step closer to the final step in order to see this to complete fruition.”
Addressing this question asked by many, “How can you keep going when you haven’t already received the full funding?” Jones responded, since nobody gave direction to stop the work, “in order to meet the deadline that they have given us, which is the end of 2014, we cannot stop and wait.”
The project will continue moving forward with the money already allocated, until the final monetary allotment for the project is received sometime in April, when the construction budget will go before the Oregon State Legislature. “That is the last piece that we are waiting for,” she said.
Construction is estimated to go vertical around July 15, after final funding is received.
Jones also reported that Hoffman has been working with several local contractors and businesses for project work and that the design project will be 100 percent complete by the end of January, when more bids will be accepted.

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Ramp Meters Coming To Beltline

Posted on 11 January 2013 by admin

By ODOT
RIVER ROAD – Construction will begin this month on an Intelligent Transportation System project to address congestion and safety on OR 569 (Randy Papé Beltline).
Adaptive ramp meters will be installed at four locations on Beltline as a short-term, low cost solution to reduce traffic delays, improve safety, and decrease fuel consumption and air pollution during peak morning and afternoon travel times.
Construction was scheduled to begin on January 7, 2013.  The ramp meters are expected to become operational at the completion of the project, June 30, 2013.
Ramp meters to be located at four locations The four locations where ramp meters will be installed are: River Road eastbound on-ramp to Randy Papé Beltline this location will be widened to two lanes. River Avenue eastbound on-ramp to Randy Papé Beltline this location will have one lane. Green Acres Road westbound on-ramp to Randy Papé Beltline this location will have two lanes. Coburg Road westbound on-ramp to Randy Pape Beltline this location will have two lanes.
The eastbound ramp meters will operate between the weekday morning peak travel period of 6:30-9:30 a.m.  The westbound ramp meters will operate between the weekday afternoon peak travel period of 3:00-6:45 p.m.  Additional metering may occur at other times, such as during events.
Ramp meters are new to Eugene but not elsewhere. Ramp meters have been used in the Portland Metro area since 1981.  There are 140 ramp meters in operation there.
Because ramp meters will be a new addition to the Eugene area transportation system, here are some Frequently Asked Questions that will help inform motorists.
What is an adaptive ramp meter? It’s a traffic signal that controls the rate at which vehicles enter a highway. The signal has only two colors: green for go and red for stop. The metering rate adjusts, within preset limits as traffic conditions change. With heavy traffic on Beltline, the metering rate slows down to let fewer cars merge, with lighter traffic the rate increases allowing more vehicles to merge.
How does it work? The signals can be set for different stop and go ranges to optimize traffic flow and minimize congestion. Regulating the timing of vehicles entering a highway avoids large groups of vehicles joining traffic all at once, which causes traffic flow to slow down on the highway behind the merge point. Signal timing will be adjusted for more effective results based on real-time data from mainline loop detectors.
Do they work? Yes! Ramp metering has increased traffic flow by 30 percent and increased peak period speeds by 60 percent at other sites. The time and length of congestion along the Beltline Highway will be reduced through ramp metering treatments.
Why do they work? The system responds to actual traffic conditions and regulates the number of cars and truck that enter a highway at one time. As a result, traffic flow is smoother and more vehicles can actually go through a corridor in less time than if a ramp meter was not present. When there is less traffic on a highway, metering rates are increased to let more cars merge onto the roadway. Ramp meters are most effective when turned on before congestion begins, which extends free-flowing traffic for longer periods.
The Beltline ITS project is funded by the Oregon Jobs and Transportation Act.  To learn more about the project, visit: http://oregonjta.org/region2/?p=beltline-delta&expandable=0
To see comparison videos of how Beltline would function with and without ramp meters, visit:  http://video_comparison.kaiproject.com/index.html

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Something For Everybody

Posted on 11 January 2013 by admin

Make New Year’s resolutions come true at the community centerBy Vera Westbrook
For the Tribune
JUNCTION CITY – In its third year at the old firehouse, the JC Community Center has a long list of activities and events planned in the coming year for those wishing to fulfill their New Year’s resolutions.
“As community support allows, there’s something for residents of all ages at the community center,” said Community Services Department Director Melissa Bowers. Take a look at some of the ways to meet those goals in the coming year.
Losing weight and increasing or just maintaining one’s fitness level is always a popular resolution.
For dance enthusiasts, there’s Zumba three times weekly with two different instructors. For gentler movement, there’s tai chi offered three times a week. Yoga is practiced twice weekly with a martial arts based self defense class also on two days a week for those 6 years and older.
The cost for most classes runs from $5 to $7 per class. Discounted six-week rates are also available.
To improve parenting skills, family members can partake in a six-week long adult special interest course called Nurturing Families. The group will meet once weekly starting in January. This program is grant funded and free to interested parties.
Many make the resolution to prepare taxes early in the year. Open to all ages, Tax Aide sponsored by AARP will assist individuals in meeting that goal with free tax preparation using on-site computers with the help of volunteers. Appointments will be held on Fridays and Saturdays from February to Apr. 15. The center will begin scheduling on Jan. 2.
Those 50 and older seeking to decrease car insurance rates may take a driver refresher course offered throughout the year by the AARP Driver Safety Program costing $14. After a six-hour class, folks may be eligible for a discount.
Medicare eligible seniors planning to get their drug and medical plans squared away by the Dec. 7 annual deadline can meet weekly with state-trained counselors from SHIBA, the Senior Health Insurance Benefits Assistance program. Volunteers with computers will take appointments for three months in fall and twice a month during the rest of the year to discuss plan options, to change plans or to sign people up for new enrollment.
Foreign residents interested in improving English language skills this year can take on-going classes for non-English speakers on Tuesdays and Thursdays costing $40 for six weeks. Scholarships are available for reduced rates.
For parents making the resolution to increase child recreation, the center provides the Global Explorers afterschool program for kids K-8 for a fee as well as summer and spring-break day camps; scholarships are available for these.
Toddlers up to 5 years old accompanied by an adult can enjoy Kid Town on Tuesdays. This activity provides an indoor playground with snacks and games for free. A free summer reading program and free summer meals including breakfast and lunch are also available for kids 18 and younger.
The vocally inclined may want to brush up on singing skills with a personal singing instructor that gives half-hour lessons for $10. A recreational Scrabble group for all ages also meets on Thursdays from 2-5pm.  St. Vincent de Paul will also offer money management courses twice a year.
For more information on these and future programs, or to rent the hall, visit the JC Community Center at 175 W. 7th Ave. on M-F from 11am-6pm or call 541.998.4767.

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Ballards Power Monroe to JC Invitational Championships

Posted on 11 January 2013 by admin

By Lyle Miner
For The Tribune News
JUNCTION CITY – Monroe wrestlers won the Junction City Invitational on Saturday with a dominating performance scoring 182 points and crowning 7 individual champions. The Dragons won 7 of the 13 weight classes and were led by the Ballards- Kaleb @ 106 lbs, Ben @ 160 lbs and Joeseph @ 195 lbs. Monroe‘s other champions were Tyler Sherman @ 120 lbs, Austin Daulton @ 132 lbs , Wyatt Stover @ 170 lbs  and Ben Baker @ 220 lbs. Randy Sherman Monroe‘s coach liked what he saw, “Our kids wrestled tough today. We were hitting our moves that we needed to hit.” The results were hard to argue with as Monroe doubled their nearest competitor Molalla at 88 points. Host Junction City finished in 5th place scoring 61 points. The Tigers only individual champion was freshman Brogan Miner @ 138 lbs. The Tigers Coach Bob Lee summarized his wrestlers performance “I was very proud of our young wrestling team this week. It was nice to get a few more kids back from injuries and see them compete. We made some improvements but still have a lot of things to work on. Miner at 138 picked up his second tournament championship of the season. Joseph and Jeremy Goodwin both had strong performances again this week finishing second. Other strong performances put in by Conner Hoag finishing 3rd. All our kids are getting better and competing hard.”

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Second Annual Baseball Cash Bingo & Chili Feed

Posted on 11 January 2013 by admin

By Vicki Jacobson
For The Tribune News
The 2013 JC High Baseball Program will be hosting its second annual Baseball Cash Bingo & Chili Feed Fundraiser on January 19th, 2013 at the Junction City Moose Lodge, 427 Front Street, Junction City starting at 6pm sharp.  This is a Cash Bingo and we will be paying back games in Cash Money including the large prize for the last blackout game of the evening.
We also have many prizes to give away, raffle items, and a fabulous Silent Auction with some incredible items to bid on.  Last year we had well over 100 people and everyone seemed to have a really fantastic time and went home with some good money and prizes.  We paid out in cash and prizes last year approximately $2000 and plan on doing it again this year.
The money we raise will continue to help with improvements to Don Rooker field and will help the boys with what they need to play this year.  We appreciate everyone’s support and hope to see all of you there.
We will have a minimum of 10 games, $3 per game and $5 for an all you can eat homemade chili feed.  Come out and join us for a night full of fun with our boys, it was a blast last year.  For information please contact 541-915-2020.

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Life For Lief

Life For Lief

Posted on 11 January 2013 by admin

liefswalk

By Vera Westbrook
For the Tribune
MONROE –Monroe area residents are pulling together through various fundraisers to help a 10-year old Alpine boy named Lief O’Niell while he waits for a new heart. Lief attended Monroe Grade School.
Headed to California for surgery in late November, Lief was transported by helicopter from Children’s Hospital in Portland to Stanford’s Children’s Hospital in Palo Alto. Local residents are supporting his family with medical needs while he waits for a donor heart in CA, which could be months.
A spaghetti dinner and silent auction held on Dec. 8 at Monroe High School raised almost $14,000 with the help of 200 donors of goods and services. Monroe resident Jen Gamache who organized the event said, “We started out with 12 tables but ended up with 20 tables of donations for the auction.”
Close to 400 people attended, with more and more people and donations trickling in as the evening progressed.
“It was one of the most amazing events I was ever involved in,” said Gamache, the owner of Jen’s Catering, who oversaw the cooking of food made from scratch. About 30 volunteers helped on the day of the event, putting the ‘fun’ in FUNdraising.  “It was like being part of a huge family.”
“The community has a big heart, even if it doesn’t have a lot of money,” said Shirley Kuhnley owner of Sweet Spot Deli and Bakery in Monroe, who donated 60 loaves of home baked bread for the dinner along with coffee and a case of spaghetti. Bellfountain Smokehouse from Monroe donated the meat. Bellfountain Community Church also donated a large portion of the food and Dari Mart helped has well.
Some of the larger auction item donors were Dr. Ben White Orthodontics from Eugene/Springfiled who donated an orthodontic treatment package worth $5,000 and Mary’s River Lumber from Corvallis that donated $2,000 of cedar fencing.
Other local donors included Artwork Dental, Alpine Vineyards, Hard Times Distillery, Benton-Lane Winery and TeBri Vineyards.
“People from all over contributed,” Gamache said, with a man from Portland having donated a home theater system after becoming acquainted with the event online.
Fundraising will continue with donation canisters placed at various businesses around the tri-county area to help Lief and his family with living expenses while they wait for a heart in CA. Monetary donations can also be made at Sterling Bank in the ‘Life for Lief’ account.
On Jan 28  Papa’s Pizza on 1577 Coburg Rd. in Eugene and also on 1030 SW Third in Corvallis will be hosting a Life for Lief pizza day where 50 percent of the proceeds will support Lief. The public is invited to attend, but needs a flyer to participate. Find a copy of the flier at www.YourTribuneNews.com People can visit the Life for Lief facebook page to participate in future fundraisers to help his family. Another auction and live music fundraising event is also planned for February 16; a location is still in the works.

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PREMIER RV SERVICES RECORD SALES ANNOUNCED

Premier RV Services Announces Best Sales Year Ever

Posted on 03 January 2013 by admin

BY Premier RV Services

JUNCTION CITY – Premier RV Services has announced strong motorcoach sales results for 2012. Pre-Owned Highline Motorcoach Sales are up 56 % year over year. Co-owner and head of the Coach Sales Division, Louie Courtemanche noted, “Premier RV considers this company’s pre-owned high-end motorcoach sales results to be another good indicator of the RV industry’s overall steady recovery. We’re pleased to offer this service to motorcoach buyers.” Courtemanche noted, “Premier-offered coaches are consigned with us primarily by friends we’ve made over the last 20 years in the industry. The Premier sales team is of the same caliber as the highend coaches offered at Premier.
Susan Graham and Mike Bassett’s customer-centric personalities and sales styles fit the Premier business philosophy of friends serving friends.” Premier RV Services offers the largest selection of Pre-owned Country Coach brand motorcoaches in the United States (along with a limited selection of other highline brand coaches) showcased within the largest indoor showroom in Oregon. At any given time, a visitor to Premier RV Services at 325 East First Avenue in Junction City, Oregon will find 20+ pre-owned coaches on display. Premier RV Services will be exhibiting at the FMCA Western Rally at the Riverside County Fair and National Date Festival January 9-13, 2013 in Indio, California. “If a customer doesn’t find exactly the coach they had in mind, we have a nationwide network of motorcoach owners and friends in the industry. We can usually find that coach for them,” Courtemanche added.
The company also has several acres of indoor, climate-controlled storage. Gary Obermire, co-owner notes, “We felt it was important to offer a good storage solution when people are not using their homes on wheels. While coaches are stored with us, most RV owners take advantage of our full service center and get things taken care of on their coach. That way not a minute of their leisure time is consumed by down-time getting the coach maintained or serviced.” Premier’s service division offers full service, house and chassis, paint and body work, electrical repair and more. For more information on the company and its services, contact Louie Courtemanche (541-953-6729) or Gary Obermire (541-554-3997). Website: www.PremierRVServices.com.
About the Company: Premier RV Services offers coach service, storage and the largest inventory of pre-owned Country Coaches in the U.S. for sale at 325 E First Avenue in Junction City, OR. Co-owned by Louie Courtemanche and Gary Obermire, Premier RV Services company founders were employed with Country Coach, LLC for 15 and 22 years, respectively. During that time as management team leaders, Louie and Gary helped drive the design and manufacturing processes of Country Coach motorcoaches. Over those same years, they built many strong relationships among the Country Coach family of motorcoach owners. With those friends in mind, Obermire and Courtemanche opened Premier RV Services after Country Coach, LLC closed its doors, offering the lowest shop rates in town and the best service technicians in the industry. Offering complete RV service, pre-owned highend coach consignment sales and expansive indoor heated storage facilities, Premier RV Services is open Monday-Friday, 8am-5pm, at 325 E 1st Ave, Junction City, OR. Email premierrvservices@gmail.com. Website: www.PremierRVServices.com. Business Phone: 541-998-2640.PREMIER RV SERVICES RECORD SALES ANNOUNCED

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Chicken

Chickens & Bees in JC

Posted on 03 January 2013 by admin

The City of Junction City is considering amending its zoning code to allow chickens, ducks, and bees on residential properties. The Junction City Planning Commission will hold a public hearing January 29, 2013 at 6:30 pm, at City Hall, 680 Greenwood Street to consider this issue. The purpose of the hearing is to take written and oral testimony on proposed amendments for residential properties located in the R-1 and R-2 zoning districts in Junction City.  Citizens may present testimony for or against the proposed amendments by submitting written comments or by giving oral testimony at the hearing. Written comments must be submitted by Friday, January 18, 2013,  in person at Junction City City Hall at 680 Greenwood Street, weekdays between the hours of 8:00 am and 5:00 pm; mailed to City Planner, City of Junction City, PO Box 250, Junction City OR, 97448; faxed to (541) 998-3140; e-mailed to jcplanning@ci.junction-city.or.us, or at the Public Hearing on Jan. 29, 2013.Chicken

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