Archive | February, 2013

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Duty Calls

Posted on 27 February 2013 by admin

IMG_6023 Interim city administrator appointed internally
By Vera Westbrook
JUNCTION CITY – After the city council accepted the resignation of current city administrator Kevin Watson, the council proceeded to fill his position with an internal nomination.
At a Feb. 12 meeting, the council appointed the city’s Community Services Department Director Melissa Bowers to serve as interim city administrator. At that meeting, Bowers agreed to accept the appointment that officially began on Feb. 12. She will be working in both positions during the next six months until a permanent city administrator is hired.
Watson will be leaving his post as city administrator of Junction City on Feb. 28 to begin a similar position in the town of Vadnais Heights, Minn., on Mar. 4. In the meantime, he will assist Bowers in assuming the required duties of her new role.
While performing her current community services duties, Bowers will also help the city with the following projects: the 2013-14 budget process, infrastructure development, the state hospital project, a potential engineering project and the JC Facilities Task Force.
Watson said the internal appointment of Bowers is good for the city because “she’s been here a long time and knows how things operate, so I think she’ll do a good job.” He also believes the city council will be patient with Bowers as she balances her two positions.
The council’s ultimate goal is to hire a permanent city administrator. Bowers will be helping the council to achieve that goal as part of her new duties.
When asked if she would consider a permanent job as JC’s city administrator, Bowers said she is open to the idea but is most interested in what is best for the city long term.
“Working as interim will give both the council and me the opportunity to see if it’s a good fit for the city,” she said. Otherwise, Bowers is perfectly happy with her position as director of the city’s Community Services Department.
Although happy with her present job, Bowers is willing to take on the extra work because “I’m doing what I can to help the city during the transition.”  She says the job will still be a team approach as many dedicated city staff are willing to step up and assist the city during the transition.
After negotiations between the mayor and the city attorney, the council will approve the terms of Bowers’ new contract at the Feb. 26 city council meeting.
Until further notice, Director Melissa Bowers can be contacted at her present office location in the JC Community Center on 175 W. 7th Ave. or by phone at 541.998.4768.

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SONY DSC

Keep It Local

Posted on 27 February 2013 by admin

SONY DSCSchool district works with local police to address truancy
By Vera Westbrook
JUNCTION CITY – School district administrators and JC police have developed a plan that deals with school district truancy locally instead of using outside agencies.
The new truancy plan approved at a Jan. 28 school board meeting incorporates local influences including the services of the JC Police Department and a local municipal judge if necessary, instead of using the Lane Education Service District (ESD) and Lane County courts. The new plan is based on one used successfully by the Springfield School District.
“The purpose is to get kids back in school to get the education that they need,” said JC High School Assistant Principal Steve Jones, with schools working with parents to provide different teaching options such as online and charter schools.
“If we can get kids and parents connected to the schools at an early age in the elementary and middle schools,” Jones said, “over time we believe there will be less truancy in high school.”
Oregon law defines truancy as eight unexcused half day absences within a four week period during the school year, but local schools prefer to address excessive absences before they turn into truancies.
“Normally we call home if there is an issue with attendance,” said Oaklea Middle School Principal Brian Young. The idea is to see if a concern exists, such as a medical condition. “Our goal is to be proactive and get the kids back into school as quickly as we can,” with most cases resolving early.
The school will then send a letter and school administrators hold a meeting, with both students and parents, before proceeding with the official truancy process.
In the past, if absences continued, the school district worked with Lane ESD, who would send a representative to deliver a truancy letter to the home of a student. The truancy was then addressed by a judge in Lane County Circuit Court.
Today, if the problem persists after proactive contact with parents and absenteeism turns into truancy, the truancy process will begin with an official letter mailed to the parents expressing Oregon law and stating the importance of attendance. A meeting with the student and parents will follow, as contact is required by law.
“From that point we see improvement in most situations,” Young said, as the letter alerts parents that a law exists and empowers them with information to present to their children.
The first letter is not sent to the police, but if no improvement is seen in attendance after that first letter and a meeting, the process moves to the next level, where a formal truancy notification is sent to the JC Police Department and is then hand-delivered to the family by a reserve officer.
“Step two involves a home visit by an officer in uniform,” Young said, which makes quite an impression.
If no improvement is seen after an officer home visit, the third step in the plan involves a formal truancy citation that is once again delivered by a police officer requesting that the parents appear in the JC Municipal Court before a municipal court judge. The judge may recommend probation or issue a fine up to $550.
“I think it will make a greater impact to have families working with local officers and our municipal judicial system as opposed to sending them to Eugene,” Young said, as the local judge is here to help parents. “Our primary goal is to make sure that kids are in school and that we can help parents in that process of bettering their childrens’ education.”

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River Road Church To Host Monthly Mobile Food Pantry

Posted on 27 February 2013 by admin

bag-groceries-food_1Mobile Pantry will increase access to Emergency Food in the underserved River Road area
By Kyle Krenik

RIVER ROAD – Food For Lane County announced they added St. Matthew’s Episcopal Church at 4110 River Rd. as a fourth Mobile Pantry site to its monthly route.
St. Matthew’s Episcopal Church began hosting the Mobile Pantry for the first time this past Saturday.
St. Matthew’s was asked to host the site because the River Road area has a relatively high concentration of people in poverty. The Church has also run a small pantry for the last several years and expressed interest in expanding its services.
The mobile pantry provides a variety of fresh and shelf-stable groceries to low-income families and individuals. Each food box contains a 3-5 day supply of food. Getting a food box is easy, but you must meet the income eligibility guidelines. You can receive other benefits, such as food stamps, and still receive a food box.
Food For Lane County, also in conjunction with the Springfield Rotary Belly Full group and Springfield public schools, has three other Mobile Pantry sites serving about 480 people at these Springfield sites during the months. Three sites are located in Springfield at Guy Lee Elementary School and Hamlin Middle School on the third Saturday of the month and Culp Creek on the last Friday of the month.
The Mobile Pantry program was piloted in the fall of 2010 as a way to get emergency food into underserved areas, with the goal of developing permanent pantry sites in each area. Since 2010, two former Mobile Pantry sites in Leaburg and Mapleton have been converted to regular pantry sites.

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goreynecklace

Gorey Story

Posted on 27 February 2013 by admin

goreynecklace
By Kira Lehman
This is a harrowing story about a cat, an Edward Gorey upside down dangling cat to be precise.
On Sunday February 10th between nine and noon our house was robbed. The perpetrator kicked in our front door and took anything that might make a quick buck. The night stands and drawers were emptied of anything valuable. Two jewelery boxes were emptied into an over night bag from the floor. Amongst the wad of jewelry a small Edward Gorey cat necklace tangled it’s chain with as many pieces as it could manage.
My husband and I came home after doing some estate sale shopping to find our antique front door bashed into splinters. After calling the police and being told to fill out an online form we checked to see if there were any pawnshops open. As it turns out they were all closed Sunday. That night after a long search through my many pictures, I put together a flier with the more unique pieces of jewelry. There were hundreds of pieces lost, many of them made by family and friends. As I was starting to print it out I thought about the Edward Gorey website with the picture of the upside down cat. I added that picture to the flier amongst the other pieces.
Monday morning as soon as the pawn shops opened we took our flier to each and every one. 3:30 that afternoon, while we were in the hardware store getting wood to patch the hole in our front door we received a call. It was from the owner of the very last coin dealer/ pawnshop telling us that he bought a bundle of jewelry and thought he had “The cat necklace.” We left everything and rushed to the shop. The owner handed me a small plastic bag and staring up at me with a wide grin on it’s face was my wonderful Edward Gorey cat, clinging to a bundle of beloved treasures.
I was elated when the owner told us he had called the sheriff with the dastardly villains drivers license information and had them on video as well.
Tuesday morning we met with the sheriff and got pictures of the couple. He left us to share the likenesses with pawn shop owners. At 4:01 that afternoon the Sheriff Deputy called us to meet him at the scene of the arrest to identify more of our stolen goods. After identifying more items and finding some closure in the arrest of the villains, I couldn’t help but laugh that this wouldn’t have happened without Edward Gorey’s little smiling cat!

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Business As Usual?

Business As Usual?

Posted on 27 February 2013 by admin

Conditional use permit filed on Harrisburg resort
By Vera Westbrook

HARRISBURG – The buzz about River Bend Resort in Harrisburg is that a local church filed for a permit with the city to add additional uses on the spacious riverfront property.
Citizen’s Bank may own the property, but Life Bible Church on Coburg Road filed a land use planning permit and conditional use permit application on Feb. 19 to add more uses to the current 23650 Peoria Rd. resort location. In the meantime, it’s business as usual at River Bend with the same employees.
River Bend Resort is a 14-acre parcel of land located on the Willamette River offering luxurious hotel accommodations as well as complete RV hook up facilities. The location is ideal for group meetings, dinners and events like weddings hosting up to 300 guests.
The conditional use permit application states the following information:
∙The current use as an RV park, hotel and resort is proposed to change by the addition of a church to the current uses.
∙The proposed new uses listed on the application include church services on weekends and on Wednesdays, other church meetings and offices during the week. The RV Park and motel will be used for travelers and benevolence use. The resort will be open for private reservations with a future kitchen facility planned.
•The reason for the permit request is listed as adding a church for primary usage with the planning of construction of a sanctuary. The abutting properties will not be affected as the location of the current development and proposed additions will keep within the design and characteristics of the original development.
•As far as drainage is concerned, the current public access is adequate for the proposed church use. City utility services are said to be adequate for current and proposed property usage. No upgrades of city utility services will be necessary.
•The proposed development is consistent with the goals and policies of the city’s comprehensive plan but would remain active at a smaller scale and volume. The addition of a church and construction of a sanctuary will benefit the development goals.
•The requirements of vehicular access have been met as access is adequate for the proposed use with the majority of church traffic occurring on weekends. Suitable parking is available now and will be after construction of the sanctuary.
•The intended use of an additional 23,000-square-foot sanctuary will enhance the curb appeal of the current facility with 29,000 square feet of combined space available.
•Adjacent properties will be adequately buffered from the new intended use as the majority of activities will take place 1,000 to 1,300 feet from public access roads or private homes.
A public hearing about this application is scheduled before the Harrisburg Planning Commission at 7pm on Mar. 19 at the Harrisburg Justice Center on 354 Smith St. for public testimony about the proposed conditional uses.

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Vacant Eagles Lodge of Irving Rd. Burglarized

Posted on 21 February 2013 by admin

Patricia Michelle Dexter

Patricia Michelle Dexter

By Kyle Krenik
RIVER ROAD – Lane County Sheriff’s Office received a report of a burglary in progress at the property that use to be vacated by the Eagles Lodge at  1375 Irving Road at At 11:18 am this morning.  The building  has been vacant for several months, and has recently been burglarized and vandalized.
Volunteers who have been caring for and checking on the facility noticed that the blinds had been drawn, they also noticed a bicycle in the building that didn’t belong there. After the volunteers entered the building and heard noises coming from the attic of the building they exited and called the police.
Sheriff’s Deputies, including Forest Patrol Deputies, responded to the call. Oregon State Police also responded to assist. Over an hour after the call came in, Authority’s  located a female, identified as 39 year old Patricia Michelle Dexter in the attic of the building. . Dexter was taken into custody and was lodged at the Lane County Jail on Burglary, Criminal Mischief 1, and Possession of Burglary Tools.

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Story

EPUD Board Approves Three Percent Rate Increase

Posted on 13 February 2013 by admin

Story
Lane County – The Emerald People’s Utility District Board of Directors approved an average three percent rate increase, effective April 1, 2013.  The Board’s decision to adopt the increase came after careful consideration of input received from EPUD staff, the Citizen Advisory Committee on Rates, and the public.

For residential customers, the increase will be implemented through a combination of a $1 increase in the basic charge and a small increase in the kilowatt-hour usage charge. The monthly residential basic charge will increase to $13 and the usage charge will increase from $0.0764/kWh to $0.0783/kWh. This increase will cost the average EPUD residential Customer-Owner an additional $3.50 per month.

EPUD’s highest priority is to provide reliable, cost-effective service to its Customer-Owners. The rate increase is needed to keep pace with rising costs of power and maintenance to EPUD’s distribution facilities. EPUD customer usage also continues to decline, particularly in the industrial sector, and these revenues are no longer available to help cover fixed costs. During the second quarter of 2012, lower revenue forecasts resulted in EPUD facing a six percent rate increase in 2013. Staff took action and made substantial adjustments to their operating budget, including position eliminations and expense deferrals. The resulting 2013 budget allowed EPUD to significantly lessen the rate increase by 50 percent.

While the utility has reduced costs and continues to look for cost-effective ways to operate, there are times when costs must be passed along to avoid impacting service. Citizen Advisory Committees have frequently advised that small, more predictable rate increases are preferable to large, periodic adjustments, and EPUD attempts to follow this strategy when required.

As a not-for-profit public power entity, EPUD provides power to its Customer-Owners at cost, and raises rates only when necessary.  EPUD rates remain among the lowest in the Eugene-Springfield area.

EPUD is a not-for-profit electric utility formed in 1978 by a small group of local citizens who wanted better, customer-oriented service at the lowest possible rates. Today EPUD serves more than 20,000 meters in Lane County, Oregon. EPUD also offers internet and web-hosting services, energy-efficiency rebates, scholarship and job shadow programs, limited-income assistance programs, and online and paperless billing.

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Moving on

Moving on

Posted on 13 February 2013 by admin

photo by  Kyle Krenik Junction City’s city administrator Kevin Watson is leaving his office on Feb. 28 to head east for a position as city administrator of Vadnais Heights, located in the suburbs of the Twin Cities of Minneapolis-St. Paul. Minnesota is the home state of Watson’s fiancée. He will begin his new job on Mar. 4.

photo by Kyle Krenik
Junction City’s city administrator Kevin Watson is leaving his office on Feb. 28 to head east for a position as city administrator of Vadnais Heights, located in the suburbs of the Twin Cities of Minneapolis-St. Paul. Minnesota is the home state of Watson’s fiancée. He will begin his new job on Mar. 4.

By Vera Westbrook
For the Tribune
JUNCTION CITY – The city council will be looking for another staff member to manage the city soon, as Kevin Watson, the present city administrator, moves on to begin another chapter of his life at the end of this month.
Watson, 31, will be heading to Minnesota now that he’s been recruited to serve as city administrator of Vadnais Heights, a town with a population of about 12,000 located in the suburbs of the Twin Cities.
“It was always the plan at some point to get to the Minneapolis-St. Paul area,” Watson said, since Minnesota is the home state of his fiancée, Kathryn Martenson, a University of Oregon graduate with a master’s degree in architecture. The two plan to get settled, buy a home and raise a family after establishing their careers. “This worked out and we are on our way.”
Originally born in Texas, Watson took a roundabout route to get to his final destination in Minnesota.
He attended high school in Montana, went to college in Oklahoma, and graduated with a master’s degree in public administration from the University of Kansas. He then worked as the assistant to the city manager of Keizer, OR, for three years before joining the Junction City staff in August of 2011.
Watson arrived in JC during challenging times, contending with the difficulties encountered while updating the city’s comprehensive plan and expanding the Urban Growth Boundary (UGB) to include the areas south of Junction City on Hwy. 99, a project that began in 2008.
With the help of city staff, city officials and volunteer citizens, he saw the completion of the JC Comprehensive Plan and the Urban Growth Boundary expansion project at the end of 2012 and successfully moved the plan up the ladder to the county level for further approval.
“My time in Junction City was a great experience—it certainly had its challenges coming in with the Westsiders and the UGB project up in the air,” Watson said, “but I look back on that fondly and am proud that we were able to get to this point.” Lane County Commissioners will review the amended JC Comprehensive Plan and proposed UGB expansion in March.
Watson has high hopes for the future of Junction City and warns residents about the long road ahead in planning for the city’s wastewater project, “which is going to impact everyone in the community,” he said. “It may be a struggle, but everyone knows the goal, so I think it will get there.”
Feb. 28 will be Watson’s last day working for Junction City, but until that time, he plans to assist the city council in finding another city administrator to take his place. That discussion will ensue at the Feb. 12 city council meeting. Soon after, Watson will head out for his first day of work in Vadnais Heights on Mar. 4. Bon voyage Kevin and Kathryn.

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Go With The Flow

Posted on 13 February 2013 by admin

Planning commission hears testimony about fowls and bees
By Vera Westbrook
For the Tribune
JUNCTION CITY – The planning commission held a public hearing on the topic of keeping fowls and bees in town, with the majority of participants supporting a semi-agricultural lifestyle within a primarily agricultural community.
Currently, fowls and bees are not permitted within the city limits. But after public requests and three work sessions later, commissioners have proposed to update current rules to recommend fowls and bees within residential areas in town.
The proposal is looking to amend the JC municipal code and zoning code to include regulations for the keeping of chickens, ducks and bees on residential properties as accessory use on lots within the R1 and R2 zoning districts. The regulations establish rules on the location, requirements and density of facilities.
A general overview of the proposed regulations will limit the number of chickens and ducks to five, with roosters prohibited. Structures to keep birds must comply with zoning setback requirements. Regulations will also limit commercial uses associated with the keeping of birds.
For bees, the maximum colonies allowed on a lot will be four, with further commission discussion. The structures must also be kept a minimum of 10 feet from any walkway, street, public building or residential dwelling.
A flyaway barrier will be required within 150 feet of public walkways and roads, or public and residential buildings other than the occupants. Beekeeping training will be required as will approval of residents living within 150 feet.
Judy Scher, the president of the Lane County Beekeepers Association, recommended a minimum of four hives in town, as beekeepers are always juggling the number of hives between whole hives and half hives that are kept during different times of the year, such as winter.
JC resident Jamie Hooper had no problem with fowl and supported bees for pollination of plants and trees.
A parent at the hearing said, “I would love for my girls to grow up and learn about the beekeeping process,” as raising animals allows children to see where food comes from. “It’s just a great learning tool all the way around.”
Barb Moffitt from JC said that many other Oregon cities allow chickens and bees in town, so she was shocked to find that Junction City—an agricultural community—had such an ordinance.
Phil Moffitt, one of the original JC residents in favor of amending the ordinance, had no issues with the registering of beekeeping credentials with the city.
After the public hearing with testimony primarily in favor of amending the current ordinance, the planning commission voted in favor of recommending the proposed ordinance amendments to allow fowls and bees within the city limits. The proposal will now go before the city council, where another public hearing will be scheduled in the future.

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A tax on the table

Posted on 13 February 2013 by admin

photo by  Vera Westbrook Jay Bozievich wanted county residents to be clear about what a May public safety levy would provide. He said: “It’s going to buy a constant 255 local jail beds every year for the next five years combined with some General Fund we aren’t going to decrease because we are getting a levy,” with 16 youth beds. This amount will be audited and proven to the public.

photo by Vera Westbrook
Jay Bozievich wanted county residents to be clear about what a May public safety levy would provide. He said: “It’s going to buy a constant 255 local jail beds every year for the next five years combined with some General Fund we aren’t going to decrease because we are getting a levy,” with 16 youth beds. This amount will be audited and proven to the public.

County looks closer at public safety levy
By Vera Westbrook

LANE COUNTY – County commissioners reviewed a draft ballot measure for a levy supporting public safety at a Feb. 5 meeting and public hearing, where county staff presented improved language.
Intergovernmental relations manager Alex Cuyler said the changes included dividing the proceeds of the proposed 55-cent tax increase at 91 percent for at least 255 adult jail beds and at nine percent for critical youth services. He also corrected that the yearly increase for a home worth $151,000 would be $85 a year for five years instead of $83.
The following language will also be updated: “This revenue will effectively halt the revolving door at the jail for violent offenders.”  Instead, the redrafted language will say: “Increased jail capacity will substantially improve the sheriff’s ability to hold those accused or convicted of violent crimes until their cases are resolved.” Cuyler also stated that no problem will exist in creating a special revenue fund for levy funds, but that additional General Fund money slated for jail beds will be kept in another fund for accounting reasons.
“We can clearly show how those dollars will be earmarked and dedicated for the purposes of keeping the 255 jail beds open over time,” Cuyler said, to assure accountability of General Fund money allotted to supplement levy dollars.
Additional language will also clarify that Sheriff Tom Turner would present the audit, but that an external auditor will perform the audit.
Commissioner Pat Farr was especially moved by several youths who shared during the public hearing whose lives were significantly improved with the help of youth services. He referred to the testimonies of one youth who is now attending college and another youth who will be graduating from high school with a 3.8 GPA—both accomplished with the aid of youth services.
“It’s remarkable how a few dollars can prevent spending so many dollars later in people’s lives,” Farr said.
Commissioner Pete Sorenson asked county budget manager Christine Moody about budget projections for the General Fund within the next few years, taking into consideration future budget cuts. He also stressed clarity on what the levy revenue will provide, which differs from what the combined General Fund money and levy funds would provide.
To ease fears about General Fund deficits in the future, Moody said, “We will not decrease the percentage of the General Fund that is going to the jail.” Even with projected General Fund deficits predicted for the future, she said, “With the General Fund and the levy fund, there’s enough to fund the 255 beds at least for the five years.”
Because of updated revisions to the ballot measure language, commissioners will wait another week to continue deliberation and to vote on the proposed levy before making a final decision about placing a public safety levy measure on the May ballot.

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Information, Please?

Posted on 13 February 2013 by admin

By Carleen Reilly

Remember when you could pick up the phone and talk with a live Operator? If you didn‘t know the phone number you were calling, you could ask for “Information, please?”, and get the number you needed. If it was a town in another state, you could actually ask, “What‘s the weather like there in Duluth?” Were things simpler then, or was it just a perception? Now, it seems hard to get information that you know is accurate.
A gathering of neighbors in December had come to find out about a parcel of land that the owner wants to annex. As the meeting progressed, the neighbors wanted to know how this annexation would affect their properties. The first assumption made was that if this property annexed to the City of Eugene, then it meant that their property would also have to annex. That is totally incorrect, but no one else seemed to be aware that it was not true. Actually, any property adjacent to the annexed property would have the option to annex if they wanted to, but annexation is not a requirement.
A second assumption was that if this property annexed to the City, then the streets would be widened and the City would charge a large street assessment fee to do the work. This is a widely held belief. To the contrary, the River Road and Santa Clara neighborhoods have worked hard to communicate to the City that our neighborhoods would not accept widened streets with curbs and gutters and the accompanying piped stormwater drains. Our neighbors do understand that rainwater needs to disperse through the ground in order to filter the water before it goes into our beautiful Willamette River. A stormwater drain discharges unclean water directly into the river, threatening fish and wildlife and contaminating water used by other municipalities downstream.
A third assumption neighbors often make, because it is told to them in error time and again, is that taxes for City residents in the River Road area are “thousands of dollars higher” than they are for County residents. A tax analysis completed less than a year and a half ago found that for the combined River Road/Santa Clara area median assessed value home of less than $144,000, taxes would cost about $322 more for the River Road City-incorporated home than it would cost for the County-unincorporated home. According to what neighbors have said, they are most interested in a City library card, which would cost $120 for a County resident. The other service neighbors are begging for is more policing. Neighbors want to be able to call the Eugene Police if there is a burglary or suspicious people prowling their neighborhood. They often say that they are willing to pay the difference in order to be able to have these services. Some are seeking to annex on their own. Other benefits of annexation would also accrue, like representation on the City Council and the EWEB Board.
As the Santa Clara-River Road Implementation Planning Team makes recommendations to the neighborhoods boards, it will become clearer what actions we can take to simplify our governance, protect land use, enhance transportation, and provide parks and recreational amenities. We will be seeking accurate information to be able to act in our neighborhoods‘ best interests. As we are just beginning the process, you, too, can educate yourself and help guide us into the future. Keep up to date on our activities by likeing‘ us on Facebook at the Santa Clara River Road Implementation Planning Team page. Contact Jerry Finigan (SCRRIPT Chair) at <jerfinigan@comcast.net> or Carleen Reilly (SCRRIPT Secretary) at <carleenr@gmail.com>.

Carleen Reilly, River Road Community Organization Co-Chair riverroadcommunityorganization@gmail.com

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High School Basketball Wrap Up

Posted on 13 February 2013 by admin

By Kyle Krenik
Junction City Boys
Feb. 5 the The Junction City Tigers lost Tuesday‘s away conference game against Elmira by a score of 48-28. Feb. 8 the Junction City Tigers basketball team won Friday‘s home conference game against Sisters by a score of 39-31.
Junction City Girls
Feb. 5 the Junction City Tigers girls basketball team won Tuesday‘s away conference game against Elmira by a score of 44-32. Feb. 8 the Tigers won Friday‘s home conference game against Sisters by a score of 38-33.
North Eugene Boys
Feb. 5 the North Eugene Highlanders lost Tuesday‘s away non-conference game against South Eugene by a score of 55-36. Feb. 8 the Highlanders lost Friday‘s home non-conference game against Sheldon by a score of 81-36.
North Eugene Girls
Feb. 5 the North Eugene Highlanders girls basketball team lost Tuesday‘s home non-conference game against South Eugene by a score of 36-25. Feb. 7 the Highlanders  lost Thursday‘s away non-conference game against Sheldon by a score of 62-31.
Harrisburg Boys
Feb. 6 the Harrisburg Eagles basketball team won Wednesday‘s neutral conference game against Toledo by a score of 42-30. Feb 8 the Eagles lost Friday‘s neutral conference game against Scio by a score of 47-46.
Harrisburg Girls
Feb. 6 the Harrisburg Eagles girls basketball team won Wednesday‘s away conference game against Toledo by a score of 48-34. Feb. 9 the lost Saturday‘s neutral conference game against Scio by a score of 61-30.
Monroe Boys
Feb. 5 the Monroe Dragons basketball team lost Tuesday‘s neutral conference game against Oakridge by a score of 40-27. Feb. 8 the Dragons basketball team lost Friday‘s neutral conference game against Riddle/Riddle Education Center by a score of 46-45.
Monroe Girls
Feb. 5 the Monroe Dragons girls basketball team won Tuesday‘s neutral conference game against Oakridge by a score of 42-23. Feb. 8 the Dragons won Friday‘s away conference game against Riddle/Riddle Education Center by a score of 42-39.

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Two Junction City High School Women’s Soccer Players sign D1 National Letters of Intent

Two Junction City High School Women’s Soccer Players sign D1 National Letters of Intent

Posted on 07 February 2013 by admin

Nord and Miner signing day pic

By Kathleen Nord

ShayLee Miner has signed a National Letter of Intent to play soccer at the University of Oregon. Miner who was a 3-time member of Oregon club state championship teams from FC Willamette and Tualatin Hills Soccer club was also a 3 time All League selection in high school for the JC Tigers. Miner, a 2nd team All State selection this past season finished her career for the Tigers with 110 goals. ShayLee, who had 3 seasons with the Oregon ’94 ODP team and was a 3 time Regional Camp Invitee. ShayLee carries a 3.6 grade point average and her major at this stage is not decided.

Elise Nord has signed a National Letter of Intent to join the San Diego State University’s Women’s Soccer team as a Goalkeeper.  Nord was part of the 2012 Oregon State Champion team, FC Portland Navy, and also helped her prior club team, FC Willamette Possession, secure a State Championship in 2008.  A four-time member of Oregon’s Olympic Development ’95 squad and a 2011 and 2012 Region IV ODP Camp invitee, Nord is a four-time Scholar Athlete and All League Honoree. Elise has a 3.9 GPA and intends to major in either Applied Mathematics or Quantitative Analysis Economics.

Miner and Nord shared their high school team’s MVP honor in 2012; have been teammates for their high school years as well as having been club teammates for the past 8. Both Nord and Miner are currently playing for Eugene Metro Soccer Club Havoc and played last year with Eugene’s inaugural Women’s Premier Soccer League Team, Azul.

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A Job Well Done

Posted on 06 February 2013 by admin

City completes wastewater system master plan

Screen Shot 2013-02-03 at 4.52.36 PMBy Vera Westbrook
JUNCTION CITY – City engineers presented a draft of the long awaited Wastewater System Facilities Plan at a Jan.22 meeting before the city council that followed with unanimous adoption. This plan outlines the city sewer system for the next 20 years based on recent population forecasts and makes no changes in city System Development Charges for sewer.
“It’s good management practice to have a document like this,” said Westech engineer Chris Brugato at a work session that preceded the city council meeting, “because it serves as a roadmap for the development of wastewater utility.” The plan is particularly important when developers come to town wanting to add utilities to a particular area.
The plan is also required by the Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) to address future capacity problems caused by increased growth, such as the addition of a state mental hospital or prison. A facilities plan is also required when a city seeks funding sources for future projects.
The updated eight-chapter plan made changes to the previous 2006 facilities plan by including updates brought on by the state mental hospital/prison and by new regulations limiting discharge into the Willamette River, which now has water quality problems.
“The first five chapters are the set up, with the meat of the document in chapters six, seven and eight,” Brugato said.
The sixth chapter outlines the collection system, use analysis and projects for the collection system, with chapter seven looking at options for improvements. Chapter eight prioritizes projects over the years and discusses the capital improvement plan.
The largest project in the plan—a wastewater treatment plant—listed various options with different discharge locations and schemes. Two alternatives were preferred, including a mechanical treatment plant with discharge into the Long Tom River and a hybrid plant that uses the same technology coupled with the existing lagoons.
Because of future capacity issues, “a major upgrade for the treatment plant is required,” he said, as well as a reworking of the collection system with its 31 projects. But the good news is complete development “isn’t going to happen for many, many years.”
Brugato also reported that many of the projects listed in the 2006 plan were already completed by developers such as the Department of Corrections and by the city as seen through local pump upgrades.
After some last-minute revisions, the final draft of the Wastewater Facilities System Plan will be presented to the DEQ in February.
“It’s a great plan that covers what needs to be covered,” Public Works Director Jason Knope said at the meeting. “There aren’t a lot of bells and whistles in here and it addresses the message from the council that I’ve perceived since I’ve been onboard . . . to make things better without getting carried away.”

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A look into the future

Posted on 06 February 2013 by admin

City reviews study for local growth and development

SONY DSCBy Vera Westbrook
HARRISBURG – The planning commission recently reviewed the results of a Harrisburg Urbanization Study that aims to provide information to assist the city with plans for progress.
The urbanization study evaluates Harrisburg for growth forecasts; inventories buildable land; identifies housing needs; identifies economic development strategies; and determines how much land the city will need to support city growth in 2012-2032 and also during 2012-2060.
Data from this study will be used to prepare documents outlining city expansion in 20 years and beyond.
“When we submit our proposal to the county and eventually to the state for the Urban Growth Boundary expansion,” City Administrator Bruce Cleeton said, “that will include as part of our packet a few amendments for our Comprehensive Plan,” the city’s outline for long-range growth and development, also based on this data.
Planning commissioners met with economic consulting firm ECONorthwest during a Jan. 22 work session where consultants presented the city with the following information from the study.
The population forecast estimates that Harrisburg will grow at a rate of 2.8 percent annually in 2012-2032, slowing to 2.5 percent in 2012-2060. The employment forecast projects employment growth at the same rates. The population to employment ratio stays stable at 4.5 persons per job between 2012 and 2060.
Employment forecasts estimate that Harrisburg will add 649 jobs in 2012-2032, with 2,011 jobs added in 2012-2060. The city will need at least 42 gross acres for employment for 2012-2032 and 130 gross acres for 2012-2060. Employment will include industrial, government, retail and services.
Currently, Harrisburg has 1,116 acres within the Urban Growth Boundary (UGB), with 940 acres in tax lots and the remainder in public right-of-ways. The city has about 364 acres of buildable commercial, industrial and residential land within its UGB. About 114 acres of buildable land is constrained by wetlands and floodplains, leaving 299 buildable acres.
Harrisburg will need to provide 1,067 new dwelling units for growth between 2012 and 2032. A housing needs analysis found a deficit of units to accommodate low- and high-income households, with a surplus of middle income. The city will need about 197 acres for new housing growth in 2012-2032, with a mix of 70 percent single family and 30 percent multifamily.
The city currently has a 134-acre surplus of industrial land for 2012-2032 and an 88-acre surplus for 2012-2060. But the land needs analysis indicates a need of 84 acres for housing and public facilities during 2012-2032, and 326 acres needed in 2012-2060. About 16 acres will also be needed for commercial employment during 2012-2032, and 51 acres during 2012-2060.
A final public hearing before the planning commission will be held in about three months after the city finishes additional work and makes a final recommendation on what property to bring into the UGB.
After the planning commission approves the UGB expansion and the Harrisburg Comprehensive Plan amendments, the final documents must then be approved by the city council, Linn County and the state.

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21st Annual Frontier Heritage Fair

Posted on 06 February 2013 by admin

LANE COUNTY – The 21st annual Frontier Heritage Fair will be held at the Lane County Fairgrounds Auditorium, 796 W. 13th Avenue, in Eugene on Saturday and Sunday, Feb.16 & 17.
The focus of the fair is pre – 1898 America, including the Mountain Man, Civil War and Old West eras. The event features artifacts and replicas of the period, on display and for sale.
There will be a kid’s activity comer and demonstrations of historic skills. Including spinning, basketry, arrow making and a foot powered wood lathe.
Show times are Sat. 9-5, Sun. 9-4. Admission is $3 for age 12 and over; kids under age 12 are free.
The Frontier Heritage Fair is sponsored by Fort Umpqua Muzzleloaders and the Lane County Historical Society and Museum. For more information call Melody Morrell 541-689-4281 or James Hayden 541-746-1819

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Thank You Form Local Aid

Posted on 06 February 2013 by admin

SONY DSCBy Carol Adams,
Junction City Local Aid,
Secretary, Board of Directors
Our community is full of caring people.  Many businesses, organizations, churches and individuals work together to be of help to our neighbors.
In November 2012, sacks of food started appearing in our local Safeway labeled for Junction City Local Aid, “Buy one and help your neighbor!”  And buy you did!  On Christmas day, after the last sack was sold, JC Local Aid had received a grand total of 881 bags, equaling 7,929 pounds of food.
Local Aid would like to thank Safeway and their employees for all the work you did on behalf of our clients.  What an outstanding project that helped so many.  We also want to recognize all Safeway stores in Lane County who participated in this project so that many other communities were helped, too.  A total of 44,849 pounds of food were donated in Lane County.
The first two Saturdays in December were the annual Letter Carriers Food Drive.  Our Junction City carriers brought us 6,380 pounds of food.  We want to thank all of you who helped – the postal carriers, as well as the volunteers at JCLA who weighed, sorted, labeled and boxed the food items.  Again, another great project that helped many in Junction City.
And last, but not least, we would like to thank our local community who gave money, bought items and donated food and clothing.  We so appreciate you and the help you give to your neighbors.  It makes our job easier and makes us smile.  Thank you.

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S.O.S (Saturday of Service)

Posted on 06 February 2013 by admin

MensKit2jpgBy Connie Dailey
Soroptimist is an international organization of professional women who contribute time and financial support to community-based & international projects that improve the lives of women and girls.The organization helps women and girls live their dreams by funding programs that improve the plight of women worldwide and locally.
One of our annual projects is the Saturday of Service project.  It is our goal to raise public awareness of the Soroptimist organization and offer a chance for community participation in our effort to help our local women in need.  In conjunction with the Junction City Local Aid Food Bank, we are creating special, “Personal Care Packages” to be distributed to the women in need in our community.  We realize many of you have contributed food items to our Local Aid, we are taking that to a personal level by collecting personal care items that the women in need do not have access to.  We did this project last year with huge success!
We will be making up these packages and we will be donating them to the JC Local Aid office where they will be distributed as needed.
If you can contribute either some of the items needed or funds, (checks would be made to- SIJC), to be used to purchase these items, it would be greatly appreciated.
Our wish list includes; Soap, Deodorant, Hair Care items (shampoo, conditioner, spray), Dental Care, (tooth brushes ,tooth paste, floss), Lotions, Kleenex, Shave Cream & Razors, Personal Beauty Products.  We want to feed their souls as well as their bodies!
The Tribune News has offered to once again be a drop off spot for the personal care items at their office at 225 W 6th Avenue, Junction City, OR If you have any questions or wish to arrange a pick-up of items you can contribute, please contact me Connie Dailey 541-998-8587 daileyconnie@gmail.com. Our distribution date will be after March 4.

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Seniors

North Eugene Senior Swimmers Celebrated

Posted on 06 February 2013 by admin

photo by  Eryne Grant Photography The following North Eugene senior swimmers celebrated "Senior Day" at the last home meet of the season, held at River Road Pool on Friday Jan. 25. Front Row Left to Right: Eryne Grant, Cassie Serra, Haydee Leighty. Back Row Left to Right: Hayden Dover, Scott Compton, Adam Hendershott, and Quinn Wallace

photo by Eryne Grant Photography
The following North Eugene senior swimmers celebrated “Senior Day” at the last home meet of the season, held at River Road Pool on Friday Jan. 25. Front Row Left to Right: Eryne Grant, Cassie Serra, Haydee Leighty. Back Row Left to Right: Hayden Dover, Scott Compton, Adam Hendershott, and Quinn Wallace

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High School Basketball Wrap Up

Posted on 06 February 2013 by admin

By Kyle Krenik
Junction City Boys
Jan. 29 the Tigers lost a neutral conference game against Cottage Grove by a score of 49-33. Feb. 1 the Tigers lost Friday‘s home conference game against Sweet Home by a score of 49-44.
Junction City Girls
Feb. 1 the Junction City Tigers girls won Friday‘s home conference game against Sweet Home by a score of 61-29.
North Eugene Boys
Jan. 29 North Eugene Highlanders basketball team lost Tuesday‘s away conference game against Marist by a score of 49-36. Feb. 1 the Highlanders lost Friday‘s home conference game against Churchill by a score of 77-42.
North Eugene Girls
Jan. 29 the North Eugene Highlanders girl’s basketball team won Tuesday‘s home conference game against Marist by a score of 48-33. Feb. 1 the Highlanders  won Friday‘s neutral conference game against Churchill by a score of 42-31.
Harrisburg Boys
Jan. 28 the Harrisburg Eagles basketball team lost Monday‘s neutral conference game against Creswell by a score of 55-53.  Feb. 2 the Eagles lost Saturday‘s neutral non-conference game against Cascade Christian by a score of 64-52.
Harrisburg Girls
Jan. 28 the Harrisburg Eagles girls basketball team lost Monday‘s away conference game against Creswell by a score of 46-37.
Monroe Boys
Feb. 1 the Monroe Dragons basketball team won Friday‘s neutral conference game against Glendale by a score of 66-27.
Monroe Girls
Feb. 1 The Monroe Dragons girls basketball team won Friday‘s neutral conference game against Glendale by a score of 40-37.

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