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Bungling burglar cuffed by JCPD

Bungling burglar cuffed by JCPD

Posted on 31 October 2012 by admin

Thief gets hand caught in the candy jar

photo by Kyle Krenik
Evidence of stolen items from local burglaries recoverd from 952 Holly St. Junction City.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

photo provided By Lane County Jail
Jason Michael Donaldson Acourding to Information from the Lane County Jail website (http://e-airs.org/eAirsInternet/) Donaldson has at least 13 alias’s

By Steve Rowland
For the Tribune

JUNCTION CITY – Wednesday evening Junction City Police Department arrested Jason Michael Donaldson at 952 Holly St., for violation of probation. During the arrest, officers noticed a candy jar and a few other items that fit the descriptions of items that had been taken from a recent B&I Hardware store burglary. Donaldson got a free ride to the Lane County jail.
Officer Nicol and Officer Markell worked through the night and called the District Attorney on Thursday morning and a search warrant was issued. JCPD officers soon found other items from other burglaries, and charged the suspect with additional crimes.
During an interview at the scene, JCPD Chief Mark Chase said, “We received some information, so obviously we had probable cause to believe, based upon earlier contact at this residence, that there was some stolen items in the house. There’s probably a couple of dozen bags in the house that they are [officers] loading up of stolen stuff. I give credit to Officer Nicol and Officer Markell who worked through the night.”
The story doesn’t end here. It is suspected that there could be more arrests to come. The JCPD is requesting that anyone who has seen Donaldson, or persons with Donaldson, to please call the JCPD at 541.998.1245. Again, the investigation is ongoing as there are additional suspects being considered and any information will be useful.
Regarding the work of his officers, Chief Chase said, “I’m really thrilled as to Officer Nicol and Markell and their keen police work that caught this suspect. Without their efforts this case could still be unsolved. We are very fortunate to have police officers like them that sincerely care about our community and are conscientious about doing the best job they can.”
Donaldson, who has at least 13 alias’s, is 36 years old. He was taken to the Lane County Jail the week of 10/7/12 by Sgt. Salisbury on another charge where he was booked and released due to the matrix system.
To protect yourself from Donaldson and similar criminals, be sure to attend one or both of the following meetings: The Junction City, Harrisburg & Monroe Chamber of Commerce is hosting a presentation by the JCPD on ?Burglar-proofing your business/home.’ It will be held on Wednesday, Nov. 14, at the Chamber Networking Breakfast at 7am at the Moose Lodge in Junction City.
To avoid overcrowding, please RSVP by Nov.12. Call Chamber Dir. Rick Kissock at 541.998.6154, or email rick@jch-chamber.org.
Also, on Thursday, Nov. 15 at 6pm at the JC High School Cafeteria, the JCPD will have a city-wide Sector Mtg. (Sectors 1-5). Of course, all businesses and homeowners are welcome. No RSVP necessary.

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Burglar Strikes B&I Hardware Again!

Burglar Strikes B&I Hardware Again!

Posted on 24 October 2012 by admin

By Steve Rowland
Publisher
JUNCTION CITY – It is doubtful that the saying, ?Third time is a charm,’ is going to work for this burglar. Upon opening B&I Hardware Store on Monday morning, owner Cary Claar discovered that he had been broken into for a second time in less than two months.
The Junction City Police Dept. came on the scene when summoned early Monday morning by Claar. The officer on the scene called Sgt. Chuck Salsbury with his K9 dog Ike to search the premises in case suspects were still in the building.
“A K9 dog is an efficient way to search quickly and safely,” Sgt. Salsbury said.  “We have collected evidence that the suspect had left behind in hopes of possibly indentifying a suspect. This is the second time, with the same MO [method of operation]. We are working every possible lead and processing all evidence in hopes of being able to solve this crime.”
Sgt. Salsbury added, “Burglaries often a direct offshoot from the money needs of meth and heroin users. We are doing all we can do. There are ways that business and homes can deter such criminals from entering their homes and property.  The recent crime wave, primarily break-ins, of the past few months has made business owners aware of their need to crime-proof their stores. Another store, the Video Revelation was broken into last week.
“There are some common elements in these burglaries,” Sgt. Salsbury said. “Poor lighting, improper door/window security, no video cameras, no horns or audio alarm—all contribute to helping the perp gain entry and, if they haven’t aroused suspicion they will continue to get what they want.”
In response to helping business owners and home owners to become more burglar-proof, the JCPD is willing to visit your property and review its needs for security.
Call Sgt. Salsbury directly at 541.998.1245 and make an appointment for an officer to review your needs and conduct a security check of any business or residence,” Sgt. Salisbury said.
“There will be no cost to anyone within Junction City. The JCPD is in contact with Rick Kissock of the Chamber [Junction City, Harrisburg and Monroe Chamber of Commerce] and are working for dates for a seminar on burglary/crime prevention presentation to the business community, and all who would like to attend. Kissock said that the first presentation will be held at a Chamber Networking Breakfast on Nov. 14, at 7am at the Junction City Moose Lodge.

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Triangle Lake Pesticide Scare

Triangle Lake Pesticide Scare

Posted on 17 October 2012 by admin

“We don’t have pollution and we don’t have more of anything here than anybody else.” Barbara Anderson

Map courtesy of Google Maps

By Vera Westbrook
For the Tribune

TRIANGLE LAKE – Some Triangle Lake residents believe their community’s been targeted with too many negative reports about pesticides in their drinking water, making the area appear more contaminated than it actually is.
The most recent article grasping the attention of Triangle Lake residents is an Oct. 1 opinion piece published in The Register-Guard written by Day Owen that mentioned a Triangle Lake school tested positive for one or more pesticides in its drinking water. The article also stated, “In other recent testing, nearly 100 percent of Triangle Lake residents were found to have 2, 4-D in their urine.”
The 2012 results of a recent Oregon Health Authority (OHA) study testing 64 residents in the Triangle Lake area living within 1.5 miles of a forestry spray area found that 59 residents had and an average urine level of the pesticide 2,4-D at 0.4 micrograms per gram of Creatinine, with levels ranging from not detectable to 37.33 micrograms per gram.
In the OHA study, this amount was found to be comparable to the amount found nationwide determined by a National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, which showed that 95 percent of the U.S. population had 2,4-D levels in urine below 1.08 micrograms per gram. The OHA study only tested for Atrazine and 2,4-D as those two chemicals are sprayed in the neighboring forests and have laboratory-testing methods available. No Atrazine was detected in urine.
“We are not all dripping of pesticides out here; it’s really a clean area,” said Triangle Lake resident Barbara Triangle Lake Pesticide Scare
“We don’t have pollution and we don’t have more of anything here than anybody else.” Barbara Anderson
By Vera Westbrook
For the Tribune

TRIANGLE LAKE – Some Triangle Lake residents believe their community’s been targeted with too many negative reports about pesticides in their drinking water, making the area appear more contaminated than it actually is.
The most recent article grasping the attention of Triangle Lake residents is an Oct. 1 opinion piece published in The Register-Guard written by Day Owen that mentioned a Triangle Lake school tested positive for one or more pesticides in its drinking water. The article also stated, “In other recent testing, nearly 100 percent of Triangle Lake residents were found to have 2, 4-D in their urine.”
The 2012 results of a recent Oregon Health Authority (OHA) study testing 64 residents in the Triangle Lake area living within 1.5 miles of a forestry spray area found that 59 residents had and an average urine level of the pesticide 2,4-D at 0.4 micrograms per gram of Creatinine, with levels ranging from not detectable to 37.33 micrograms per gram.
In the OHA study, this amount was found to be comparable to the amount found nationwide determined by a National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, which showed that 95 percent of the U.S. population had 2,4-D levels in urine below 1.08 micrograms per gram. The OHA study only tested for Atrazine and 2,4-D as those two chemicals are sprayed in the neighboring forests and have laboratory-testing methods available. No Atrazine was detected in urine.
“We are not all dripping of pesticides out here; it’s really a clean area,” said Triangle Lake resident Barbara Anderson. “We don’t have pollution and we don’t have more of anything here than anybody else.”
Although Owen’s article further stated that government agencies found that the levels of pesticides detected were safe, Owen’s concern was about the unknown affect of multiple pesticides used together. Owen also suggested tougher laws to protect the public from chemical drift in water and air.
Anderson is proud of the Triangle Lake area and fears that bad press targeting the area will scare the public and cause folks to avoid the place.
“People won’t want to come out here and swim in our lake and they won’t want to send their children to our school,” she said. “We have a beautiful school out here and a beautiful lake with fish jumping every few minutes—you can even see the bottom of the lake!”
Anderson would like to see less negative media about the Triangle Lake area.
“It would be beneficial to the community if we would all work together to make a plan and do what we can if there is a big issue wrong, as this is not the right approach,” she said.
Please see the online version of the story for web addresses for the OHA study results, The-Register-Guard article and YouTube videos of meetings about the study and the subject of pesticides in the Triangle Lake area.

The results for the Triangle lake study done in 2011 can be viewed at Oregon Health Authorities web page: http://public.health.oregon.gov/HealthyEnvironments/TrackingAssessment/EnvironmentalHealthAssessment/Documents/EI factsheet_final.pdf

Summary: http://public.health.oregon.gov/HealthyEnvironments/TrackingAssessment/EnvironmentalHealthAssessment/Documents/EI%20factsheet_final.pdf

Full version: http://www.atsdr.cdc.gov/HAC/pha/Hwy36CorridorEIReport/Highway36CorridorEI03052012.pdf

Video YouTube links to April 2012 OHA pesticide study meeting at the grange in Triangle Lake;

Part 1

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QUYnFZSSZTI

 

Part 2

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oSoSCjB5kNU&feature=relmfu

Part 3

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=50flDClXVpg&list=UU48FVT5EWjmvbzKQpQZMGNQ&index=2&feature=plcp

Part 4

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TY7U994sC1c&list=UU48FVT5EWjmvbzKQpQZMGNQ&index=1&feature=plcp

Link to the guest viewpoint written by Day Owen of the Pitchfork Rebellion in the Register guard on Oct. 1:

http://www.registerguard.com/web/opinion/28800695-47/drinking-pesticides-schools-atrazine-oregon.html.csp

Link to OHA school well water test results

http://public.health.oregon.gov/HealthyEnvironments/DrinkingWater/SourceWater/Pages/pdp-schools.aspx

 

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The Hellevator’at Purgatory Pass

The Hellevator’at Purgatory Pass

Posted on 09 October 2012 by admin

photo by Kevin O’Hare
The saloon doors will be open at 7pm Friday, Oct. 19 and Saturday, Oct 20, as well as Friday, Oct. 26 and Saturday, Oct. 27 at the Chamber of Darkness Haunted House in Monroe. The newest addition is the ?Hellevator’ which took months to build.

By Gini Bramlett
For the Tribune

MONROE – Purgatory Pass is back for its second season at the Chamber of Darkness Haunted House in Monroe. The ?Hellevator’, which took the ?gang’ months to create, is the newest addition.
“I don?t want to give too much away, but it has been months in design and building, but worth the wait,” said Lorrie O’Hare, director of Share and Scare Productions and a Monroe resident.  The haunted house is on the Belchamber property located at 24800 Hwy. 99 W. across from the City Park.
The saloon doors will be open Oct. 19, 20, 26 and 27 from 7-11p.m. Admission is $7 at the door, but if you bring two cans of non-perishable food, $1 will come off the admission price.
All the proceeds and donations are distributed locally. Last year’s proceeds benefited seven various organizations. Lorrie said that recipients of this year’s proceeds will be determined after gross sales are reviewed.
Guests will enter Purgatory through a 32 ft. mine shaft and encounter The Ghost Train. The Purgatory Motel is accepting ’reservations’ from those who arrive on the ?Hellevator’. And, don’t forget to stop at Grannies Kitchen which will be serving up deep-dish terror including ghoulash and kidney pie among other macabre fare.
The ?gang’ has been in the planning and building stage since last November.
“It?s pretty much a full-time job,” said Lorrie. “We try to have a monthly meeting to keep everyone involved informed.”
Although the staff has changed over the seven years the haunted house has been there, the goal continues to be the same; to entertain and give back to the community.
Last month the house was vandalized leaving the crew to fix a broken window and door, along with other property damage. Benton County Sheriff’s office responded and investigated. Although the team was shocked and disappointed by the damage, they didn?t let this random act detour them from their goal of opening on time.
“It was nothing that could not be repaired,” said Lorrie, “but instead of spending our day building, our time was spent re-securing the house.” Purchasing security cameras is next on the to-do list.
Although the age limit for the haunted house isn’t specific, Lorrie says it’s probably not recommended for very small children, although they have roamers who work the guests in the Q-line to spread word through the house if things need to be toned down for a particular group.
Scare & Share thanks the community members who have supported them over the years. Community support is the key to Scare & Share?s success.

photo by Kevin O’Hare
This year’s haunted house build gang from left to right is Lorrie O’Hare, Nick Zinni, Katie Maixner, Steve Perritt and Karl Roler. Not pictured are Justin Aune, Matt Perritt and Darrell Brummett.
“They all donate their time and skills, and are deeply valued as Scare & Share members,” said Lorrie.

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Oregon Electric Railroad celebrates 100 years in Junction City

Oregon Electric Railroad celebrates 100 years in Junction City

Posted on 03 October 2012 by mlong

The first Oregon Electric train stopped on Holly Street on Oct. 15, 2012

 
By Linda VanOrden
For the Tribune

JUNCTION CITY – It was Oct. 15, 1912 – 100 years ago – when the first Oregon Electric train travelled south on Holly Street in Junction City and stopped at the newly constructed depot at the southwest corner of 5th Avenue and Holly Street.
Beginning on New Year’s Day 1908, Oregon Electric trains began operating between Portland and Salem. On the Fourth of July, 1912, Albany welcomed the Oregon Electric to town.
In September, 1911 Oregon Electric was granted a franchise to operate through Junction City on Holly Street. (It has been stated that Dr. Norman Lee’s wife, Amanda did not want the train going so close to her home, but Dr. Lee supported it as being good for the town.) In November of 1911, the OE let a contract for 5,000 railroad ties from a mill on the Samuel Ferguson farm west of Junction City.
A grading camp was established in Junction City on Nov. 27, 1911. They contracted with a Junction City restaurant to feed 25 men and with a livery stable to care for 40 teams. Contracts had also been made with local farmers for delivery to the camp of 1,000 bushels of food.
By March of 1912, work was beginning on the most difficult section between Albany and Eugene – the section between Harrisburg and Junction City where the line would cross the Willamette River and long stretches of flood plain. Piling for the bridge work and trestles were being cut six miles down the Willamette on Ingram’s Island. The piling was then towed up the river by powerful launch which brought up ten piles at a load and made four trips a day. A five-span bridge was begun, as well as a temporary pile and timber bridge for work trains.
The rails were laid from Albany to Eugene at the rate of two miles a day. Using a ?Pioneer’ track-laying machine to speed the work, it was determined that track should be laid to Eugene in 10 days.
The first electric car passed through Junction City on Oct. 11 to test the lines. Passenger service began Oct. 15, 1912 with five round trips between Portland and Eugene daily – two limiteds making the trip in four hours; two locals making the trip in five hours and the OWL. Businessmen could board the OWL at 9:30 each evening and stay on board while it meandered down the valley, until 8 o’clock the next morning. They could do business all day at the other end and return home the same way. Round trip fare from Portland to Eugene was $3.60.
Improved roadways, automobiles and trucks, as well as the Great Depression took a toll on railroad passenger service. By July of 1932 the OE dropped passenger service to one round trip daily. The last passenger trip was made between Portland and Eugene in May, 1933.
Electric locomotives were replaced by diesel locomotives in1945 and the railroad survived as a freight railroad into the 1990s.

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Cheshire resident Corinne Bienvenue celebrates 100 years

Cheshire resident Corinne Bienvenue celebrates 100 years

Posted on 26 September 2012 by admin

Family Photo
Connie Bienvenue sports a crown at her 100th birthday bash on Sunday at the home of her son and daughter-in-law, Andrew and Karyne Bienvenue in Cheshire. Guests from around the US and even Taiwan attended her milestone event.

Guests from as far away as Taiwan came to help her celebrate on Sunday

By Gini Bramlett
For the Tribune

CHESHIRE – Corinne ?Connie’ Bienvenue’s secrets to a long life include living simply, being loving to everyone, eating properly and being happy in what you do. Connie turned 100 years old on Sunday, so she should know.
“This way you will be happy and healthy,” said Connie, who rode her bike daily until quite recently. “That’s the way I’ve lived and I didn’t fuss about anything. I tried to be a good girl all through my life, and I still do.”
Her milestone birthday was celebrated on Sunday with a party at the home of her son and daughter-in-law; Andrew and Karyne Bienvenue in Cheshire. The bash was attended by nearly 100 guests – family and friends – from as far away as Washington DC, Texas and even Taiwan.
Connie was born and raised in Manchester, NH “to a very loving family.” She was favored by both parents and her siblings.
“I always preferred to be running around outdoors, and my siblings would have to hunt me down and get me cleaned up and in the house in time for dinner or face the music. My father could be stern about manners.” said Connie. “I remember on Saturdays he would say, ?Bring me your shoes,’ and he would polish six pairs of shoes to be ready for church on Sundays.”
Singing in the choir with her sisters is a fond memory for Connie,
“We were quite good,” she said. “We loved to go to church.”
Connie met her husband in the choir when she 20 and he was 18. All the other boys were interested in her, but she only had eyes for Irving ?Benny’ Bienvenue.
“Oh, he was so good looking,” Connie crooned. “I wasn’t boy crazy. I was choosy!”
The couple was married for 50 years when Benny passed away at age 65.
“He was the love of my life.”
The couple raised seven children who produced 15 grandchildren, 23 great grandchildren, and so far, four great great grandchildren.
Connie is nearly blind now, so she spends much of her time listening to the radio. She enjoys church music and music from the 20s, 30s and 40s and avidly follows the Ducks and current events. Just don’t ask her about our current president. You’ll get an earful with some colorful language.
Happy Birthday, Connie!

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Meth, a monster with many names

Meth, a monster with many names

Posted on 18 September 2012 by admin

Speed, Ice, Chalk, Crank, Fire, Glass, Crystal
By Steve Rowland
Tribune Publisher
I remember when we complained that our Oregon government was being too restrictive when they passed a law on the sale of ephedrine and pseudoephedrine, two of the most common ingredients in cold medicines. HB 2485 was made into law in Sept. 2006; since then, only Mississippi has followed suit. The chatter around town in 2006 was that this was ineffective and would do little to curb the manufacture of methamphetamine and its users, and that we would have to suffer with colds. Strangely, it depends on how you look at numbers and their sources.
A 2010 Oregon State Police (OSP) Medical Examiner Department report states methamphetamine-related deaths in the state of Oregon were at 106 while heroin was at 90 and cocaine at 20, and 18 people died from using the drugs in combination.
The report lists Lane County with two heroin and 14 meth deaths; Linn with one cocaine and seven meth and one combined drug death; and Benton with one heroin and two meth deaths. These statistics seem small; but please read on, and don’t be distracted by HB 2485.
A May 2011 article by Maxine Bernstein of the Oregonian, quoted the then Lincoln County District Attorney Rob Bovett as saying, “Since Mexico banned pseudoephedrine five years ago, and due to the rigid Oregon restrictions, the bulk of meth production has moved to California, Arizona, Nevada and Washington. The drug organizations are paying people in these states to purchase pseudoephedrine products in quantities below legal thresholds from retail stores.”
A February 2012 report by Chris Stomberg and Arun Sharma of the Cascade Policy Institute, a research center of Oregon, questions the effectiveness of HB 2485. They cite numbers that indicate the decline from 467 meth lab incidents in 2004 to 12 in 2010 are the result of other factors because our neighboring states also declined similarly. “The exact mechanism behind this shared decline is not known, but would appear to reflect technological or market changes unrelated to the Oregon law. As a result, Oregonian’s pay more for cold medication.”
The Stomberg/Sharma report says there was a 23 percent decline in meth use nationally during the years 2006-2009, yet they note that ?Oregon state law enforcement personnel indicate meth use to be Oregon’s greatest drug threat.’
So, who do you believe? Maybe both? Was the ephedrine law meaningful? What is important?
It is now 2012. Are we to deduct that less meth houses blowing up mean less meth use? Are we to assume that meth users don’t hurt anyone but themselves?
One thing is certain. A lot of people are affected by manufacture and sales, and meth use, along with the meth user is their family and then their immediate neighborhoods and communities. Meth is said to be tied to almost every property and identity theft crime in Oregon.
State Medical Examiner Dr. Karen Gunson was quoted by Berstein as saying, ?. . . it?s not too hard to jump off buildings or drive crazy while you?re on meth.”
Here are some facts from a Wasco, OR publication:
· Meth use among Oregon females 17 and under has increased by 57 percent over the past five years.
· Addiction rate is said to be 99 percent for first-time users; and the life expectancy of a habitual user is five years.
· 73 percent of Wasco County child abuse cases are meth-related.
· Five pounds of toxic waste is produced in the manufacture of every one pound of meth.
Deputy Bret King of Multnomah County Sheriff’s Office has a project called the ?Faces of Meth.’ He starts each of his presentations by saying, “I thank the men and women who, through their stories and photos, can share their experience with methamphetamine so you never have to try it yourself to know what it can do. I have seen and interviewed each of these people in jail. I hope that in seeing this you will make choices to not use methamphetamine and that I will never see you come inside my jail.”

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Teen killed by train over weekend

Teen killed by train over weekend

Posted on 11 September 2012 by admin

Julius Schmidt was tragically struck by the Amtrak on Saturday while playing with friends – Police urge everyone to use extreme caution around the train tracks

By Sayde Moser
For The Tribune
JUNCTION CITY – A steady line of mourners could be found on Front Street Sunday, leaving flowers and saying prayers for the family of Julius Schmidt who was hit and killed by the Amtrak train Saturday night.
The accident, which happened at approximately 8:30pm on Sept. 8, was between 4th and 6th Avenues – nearly the same spot where John Muller was killed two years ago on Aug. 10.
Two witnesses who were with Julius, 14, that night said they were on the tracks trying to outrun the train. According to Police Chief Mark Chase, the two witnesses said Julius had reportedly been known to run in front of the train on Holly Street, although that has not been confirmed.
All three teens were on the tracks running away from the train, reported the train conductor.  The conductor of the southbound Amtrak sounded his horn and locked the brakes at 6th Avenue but didn’t come to a complete stop until the train was past 1st. The other two were able to jump out of the way.
“They were reportedly running along the tracks and intended to jump off in the air as the train goes by and get a rush,” Chase said. He added that the witnesses said Julius had done it before, but they had not.
The scene was closed down for approximately three hours as officers re-constructed the accident, interviewed witnesses and Amtrak personnel. Junction City Police along with the Oregon State Police, Union Pacific Railroad Police and the Lane County Medical examiner’s office responded.
Officers determined there were no signs of impairment of the train engineer operating the train at the time of the accident.
“The train tracks are not something anyone should be on at any point in time,” Chase said, adding that at 76-77 miles per hour the train can be upon you very quickly. “Hopefully other kids will realize this is very serious and they should avoid this type of behavior.  This is a stark reality of what can happen.”
Grief councilors were available at Oaklea School on Monday for students who needed help coping with the tragedy and Chase has been collaborating with Principal Brian Young to bring Operation Life Saver to the schools.
Operation Life Saver is a train prevention program which talks about train safety and what the dangers are. According to the program, a person or vehicle is struck by a train every three hours in the united states. It offers safety tips and the consequences of walking on the tracks. To learn more visit www.oli.org.

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JC wetlands issue raises more questions

JC wetlands issue raises more questions

Posted on 06 September 2012 by admin

City council disagrees on whether appropriate steps were taken to notify public of wetland inventory and potential regulations

By Sayde Moser
For the Tribune
JUNCTION CITY – Voices were raised, fingers pointed and accusations made last week when City Administrator Kevin Watson was put on the spot to present the council with proof that the city had followed all the appropriate steps in alerting citizens of the Local Wetland Inventory (LWI) that was done in 2009, and giving them an opportunity to comment on the draft before it was approved by the state.
“The staff at the time followed the process for the LWI to the letter and it was approved by the council,” Watson stated after giving a brief synopsis of the different meetings and solicitation for public comment that revolved around the wetlands inventory, most of which happened before Watson was even hired.
“There were many meetings with the Citizen Comprehensive Planning committee (CCPC), planning commission and city council with potential for discussion of the LWI,” he added. “There are concerns the public did not receive the proper opportunities to be involved in LWI. In all the research we have done, that is not the case.”
“I think that the problem is not whether this was done legally according to the state, the problem is whether the council and the mayor think that staff snookered this in,” Councilor Bill DiMarco said. “Before staff ever sent the LWI in (to the state for approval), I don’t believe the city council or planning commission had a full understanding of what the consequences were. I’m sure this will fly at the state level, but that isn’t the problem; I think the community feels like they haven’t been served by the process and I agree with them and haven’t seen anything to change my mind.”
Councilor Randy Nelson stated he remembers discussing the wetland issue time and again and admitted he never fully understood it because it was so complex.
“I remember going through this and I know you were at the meetings so I don’t understand why you don’t remember taking all the pieces of this puzzle and trying to put it together,” he said to Councilor DiMarco. “This was all brought to the council and we had to make some sort of decision to get the ball rolling so we did.”
“What I am trying to say is this document tells me I should know everything that happened and I shouldn’t be complaining and that everyone else also had plenty of notice to understand it,” DiMarco answered. “I freely confess I am stupid as they are because I sure missed it too.”
Gary Crum, an avid First Amendment supporter, also agreed with DiMarco that certain steps weren’t taken to make the public aware of what was going on. He claimed that the city never held a public meeting for citizens to review the LWI draft before it was sent to the state.
“Watson says it was done at the CCPC meeting on March 16, but the purpose of that meeting was to review local wetlands inventory and housing needs analysis; Nowhere in that meeting is it mentioned that the draft of the LWI will be available for public review and comment,” he said. “This important step was not taken; the opportunity for the public to review the draft LWI was not given. That is a serious breach of proper procedure.”
“I am really sorry there is so much confusion about wetlands,” Mayor Dave Brunscheon added at the end of the lengthy discussion. “We have had many committee meetings and spent many hours on this; I really hope that no one thinks we are intentionally trying to snooker anyone. I would never do that to anyone in this city.”
A public hearing to discuss the planning commission’s recommendation on wetland regulations will be held at city hall on Thur., Sept. 6. The public is encouraged to attend.

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Crime spree hits Junction City businesses

Crime spree hits Junction City businesses

Posted on 30 August 2012 by admin

photo by Jeanni Cuthbertson
This wheelbarrow of flowers, displayed outside Remains of the Day on Sixth Avenue was found last week tipped over with the flowers strewn across the sidewalk. A recent crime spree in downtown has some business owners wondering how to keep their businesses safe.

Police department urges businesses to keep alarms on and install cameras to prevent criminal activity

by Sayde Moser
for The Tribune
JUNCTION CITY – Several Sixth Avenue businesses were the victims of an unusual crime spree earlier this month.
Donna Galusha at Kelley’s Barber Shop on the corner of Sixth and Holly came to open up shop last week to find the right side of the door frame ripped off, breaking the lock on the door. Yet, nothing was missing and the only damage was to the door and the gumball machine, which had been moved and knocked over.
“These machines can sometimes have a couple hundred bucks in them,” she said. But the criminals didn’t try to get the money out; rather it looked to Donna like they tried moving the two candy machines out the door. One machine was moved away from the wall and closer to the door, making Donna assume they got spooked and ran off before hauling it off.
“It honestly sounds like some kids to me,” she said, although she seemed perplexed on exactly how they were able to rip part of the doorframe off. “Come six o’clock on a week day, this whole downtown area is closed up for the night and there is no one around.”
Donna leaves her lights on all night to deter break ins and in the three years she has been running the barber shop she has never before been broken into. Her dad ran the business for 30 years and it has always been in the same downtown location.
“It’s just irritating,” she said. “We really need to keep our eyes open for anything suspicious happening down here, because whoever did this came from somewhere and it’s hard to believe no one saw them.”
Just across the tracks at Farmers Insurance, agent Kym Housley found evidence of a break-in just a week prior to Kelley’s Barber Shop. They didn’t get in, however, but the lock had been tampered with and the newly painted door was damaged.
Again on Sixth Avenue, B & I Hardware was broken into on the night of Aug. 21. Leona Housten showed up around 7am and headed upstairs to clock in when she found the safe tipped over with a fist-sized hole in the side.
“It appears that they used a pick axe to pick through the side,” she said. The robbers left the tools, which they had borrowed off the shelves downstairs. They weren’t able to make off with all the cash that was inside, since they never got the door off the safe. But apparently they took whatever they could reach from inside the hole.
“It was definitely hard work and we figure they were here for a couple hours at least,” she said. “We do feel like we were targeted because nothing else was stolen. They went straight for the safe.”
The robbers entered the lumberyard through the alley and broke down the door using material they gathered from the lumber yard. In the 17 years Leona has worked at B & I, she said they have never experience a break in like this.
Police Chief Mark Chase told The Tribune News that Officer Mike Bonner is doing foot patrols downtown at night and his department is investigating the B & I incident.
Recently the department arrested two suspicious persons, one with stolen goods in a backpack and both with warrants out for their arrests. Chase couldn’t say if they were the ones responsible for the downtown break ins, but stressed that when his department is busy investigating other criminal activity in the city, they aren’t as available to patrol. He said there is a direct correlation between the number of officers who can be seen patrolling the city and the amount of burglaries and other crimes committed.
He advised business owners to install cameras and alarm systems if they don’t already have them and report any suspicious activity or people.
“We need the assistance and cooperation of the citizens of Junction City to help us do our job,” he said. “If you see someone that looks suspicious call it in and give as good of a description as you can.”
He urges people to note as many details as possible: hair color, height, what they are wearing, if they are carrying anything etc.
“We have a responsibility as a community to work together and keep the public safe,” he said.

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Controversy over wetlands

Controversy over wetlands

Posted on 21 August 2012 by admin

photo by Sayde Moser
Junction City residents filed in to city hall last week in response to a local wetland inventory that identified wetlands on or near their property. The identification of wetlands can prohibit what some land owners are allowed to do with their property, based on regulations set forth by the State of Oregon.

By Sayde Moser
For The Tribune
JUNCTION CITY – It was standing room only inside council chambers last week at a public hearing with the planning commission. City councilors and citizens alike crowded inside for a chance to have a voice and listen to the planning commission’s decision on protection of local wetlands.
Since 1973, the state of Oregon has maintained a statewide program for land use planning in the form of 19 statewide planning goals. Fourteen of these goals apply directly to Junction City.
Goal 5 involves identifying and protecting wetlands. The state has mandated the procedures, standards and definitions involved in identifying wetlands and determining which wetlands are significant.
In 2008, the city began the process of identifying its wetlands and notifying property owners of wetlands on their property. The city held a number of open houses to help property owners understand the process of protecting wetlands.
In 2011, the final wetland inventory was completed and approved by the Department of State Lands and notices were sent to property owners identifying the wetlands. The city was then required to adopt an ordinance to either fully or partially protect its wetlands.
Full protection of significant wetlands would prohibit any sort of structure development or vegetation removal on that land, and possibly include removing current structures.
The city chose not to offer full protection on any existing wetlands.
Partial protection, which the city did choose, allows for property owners to maintain existing structures built on wetlands as well as mow their lawns, spray herbicide, replace vegetation and build additional structures, provided they aren’t built directly on top of the wetland. Partial protection does not require landowners to take out fences or other structures currently on wetlands.
Planning Commissioner Jason Thiesfield informed those present that if the city does not enforce some sort of protection, the state will take over and everyone will be subject to the state’s standards for protecting wetlands.
“If we don’t do something about it and try and give you guys as many rights as possible through our process, then the state is going to take over,” he said, adding that under the current local protection, property owners will not have to change their existing use of the property.
“If we gave these wetlands full protection, then you would probably have to tear down existing structures on wetlands, and you would be forced to change how you use that land,” he said. “We are trying to protect you guys as much as possible from the state with what we have available.”
The city also chose not to add a buffer zone, which many jurisdictions enforced. A buffer would be an area protected beyond the edge of the wetland.
“We haven’t added any wetlands at all,” said Jeff Hagg, also with the planning commission. “We got handed a list from the state with our wetlands, saying protect them or we will take over and do it. What we are trying to do is protect each person’s individual rights with the minimal amount of law imposed on your property.”
Numerous residents still voiced their dislike over the issue, especially those who have an easement on their property for a city drainage ditch. Those drainage ditches, installed in the 60s for the purpose of draining flood and rainwaters away from neighborhoods, have been recognized by the state as wetlands. The wetlands begin at the center of the ditch and extend outwards.
“Our objection to this proposal,” said Lou Hannavan, “is that the original goal or objective of drainage across private property is the polar opposite of a wetlands goal or objective of returning an area to its native state of vegetation and habitat for the benefit of the public. The proposal not only publicly takes privately owned property, without compensation, for a community asset, but requires the affected landowners to continue paying real estate taxes, liability insurance premiums and to suffer the financial impact of the decreased use and market value of their property.”
The Hannavans are petitioning signatures from residents to challenge the public taking of private property.

08-16-12 PC Part 1

08-16-12 PC Part 2


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Another successful festival

Another successful festival

Posted on 14 August 2012 by admin

The hot weather didn’t seem to deter the large crowds that attended the Scandinavian Festival last week in Junction City. Various new entertainment and new food vendors kept things hopping. “Festival was fantastic,” said festival president Taryl Perry. “The first three days the weather was great, the vendors were happy and we had great crowds. We appreciate the support of everyone.”
Photo By Kyle Krenik

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Country Coach Friendship Rally raises more than $9,000 for local food banks

Country Coach Friendship Rally raises more than $9,000 for local food banks

Posted on 07 August 2012 by admin

photo by Kyle Krenik
Susan Jones of Local Aid in Junction City (left) and Vesta Craiger of God’s Storehouse in Harrisburg (right) were each given a check for $4,816.50 which was raised by Country Couch Friends Incorporated. Gary Wallstrom, a member of CCFI, presented the checks to each food bank. This was the second year in a row that CCFI held a rally at Riverbend in Harrisburg and helped raise money for the foodbanks.

By Sayde Moser
For The Tribune
JUNCTION CITY – Junction City Local Aid Director Susan Jones and Harrisburg’s God’s Storehouse Director Vesta Craiger stood outside Local Aid in Junction City with Gary Wallstrom, a member of Country Coach Friends Incorporated (CCFI), who presented each food bank with a check for $4,816.50.
The money was raised during the second annual Country Coach Friendship Rally, which brought 170 motor coach owners to the area for an entire week. Money was raised through raffle ticket sales and a live auction.
Last year, donations were more than $8,000 to be split between both food banks.
“I told you guys going into this, I didn’t think we could match last year,” Wallstrom said to Susan and Vesta. “I was shocked.”
Both Susan and Vesta were able to give a presentation to the rally attendees, explaining the need for community food banks.
“Junction City Local Aid and God’s Storehouse have been blessed by the generosity of Country Coach Friends Incorporated,” Susan said. “Country Coach owners are very loyal to the brand and we are grateful they have chosen to help out our communities.”
Wallstrom said he chose the two food banks as the recipients of the money raised because while he is a member of CCFI, he is also Chairman of the Marian/Polk Food Share.
“This is very near and dear to my heart,” he said. “Over the years we have supported many great charities but this cause really touches me. In my opinion, in no other non-profit can you measurably see where your money goes. It is very efficient and provides a tremendous need.”
For God’s Storehouse, Vesta said the money would go towards purchasing protein. “The food we get from FOOD for Lane County is wonderful, but we are always low of protein, and the protein we do get doesn’t last long,” She said.
She said she would be purchasing hamburger and other meats, as well as dairy products.
Last year, the money raised helped her fix four leaks in her roof.
Susan said the money for Local Aid would also help fill in food gaps, such as protein. However she is also able to offer assistance in other ways, such as helping with past-due electricity bills. For clients of hers who are living in tents or camp trailers and aren’t hooked up to electricity, she can offer them $20 vouchers for propane at Junction City Farm and Garden.
“That way they can either stay warm, or have a way to cook their food,” she said. “We can go a step beyond just handing them the food, but also give them a way to cook it.”
The annual CCFI rally returns to Oregon each year, near where all the Country Coach motor coaches were built. The organization was formed one year ago at the first rally in Harrisburg and is an international chapter of Family Motor Coach Association. Starting with only 40 members, it now boasts more than 190 members.
The rally is sponsored each year by several local businesses, including Oregon Motorcoach Center, Country Coach Corporation, Guaranty RV Center, Premier RV Services, Bob Dickman Tire Center/ Les Schwab and several others. This year’s main event was held at Riverbend RV Resort in Harrisburg.
“This summer saw a nice return of the larger motor home buyers back to Junction City, where they purchased a motor home originally,” said Shannon Nill of Guaranty. “These folks enjoy our beautiful area and the quality service and sales they get from our area. Premier RV, River Bend, Country Coach, Guaranty and Oregon Motor Coach – across the nation, we are becoming known as the place that has everything the RV customer needs.”
To learn more about CCFI, contact Jerry O’Connor at jerryobus@aol.com.

 

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Fourth Annual  Blues Build Benefit

Fourth Annual Blues Build Benefit

Posted on 10 July 2012 by admin

Big Monti, The Vipers and Gaye Lee Russell perform
July 22 at Pfeiffer Winery

JUNCTION CITY — Big Monti will headline the 4th Annual Jerry’s Home Improvement Center Blues Build Benefit for Junction City/Harrisburg/Monroe Habitat for Humanity at Pfeiffer Winery west of Junction City on Sunday, July 22 from 2:30-7:30pm. Proceeds will support Habitat’s home construction projects. Also performing will be The Vipers with special guest Skip Jones, and Gaye Lee Russell and Her Bad-Ass Band.
Drawing for a $1,000 Jerry’s Home Improvement Center gift card will be held at the conclusion of the Blues Build Benefit. Raffle tickets are on sale for $10 each or three for $25 and are available at the Habitat for Humanity Office, 585 Greenwood in Junction City and from Habitat volunteers. Raffle tickets will also be available at the Blues Build Benefit.
Tickets can be purchased online at www.daistickets.com/bluesbuild. Advance tickets for $15 are also available at Pfeiffer Winery, in Eugene at CD World, House of Records and the Museum of Unfine Art and Record Store, in Corvallis at the Benton Habitat for Humanity Restore, Junction City at Citizens Bank, Emerald Valley Compounding Pharmacy and the Habitat for Humanity office located at 585 Greenwood St. and in

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Scandifest is recognized Travel Lane County award banquet good for business.

Scandifest is recognized Travel Lane County award banquet good for business.

Posted on 19 June 2012 by admin

By Steve Rowland
For The Tribune
JUNCTION CITY – Junction City’s Scandinavian Festival was recognized as one of the three top destination reasons that people come to Lane County at the recent Travel Lane County annual awards banquet, held June 13.
Sandwiched between the nominations of the long-running Asian Celebration and Vince Lanana’s Tracktown USA, JC’ fsestival came in behind the winner – Tracktown USA. Nonetheless, that put Junction City’s Scandinavian Festival in very elite company. In this reporter’s opinion, being number two is not bad at all.
Also nominated for the 2012 Partnership Award was the Oregon RV Alliance who came in behind the winner, Eugene’s Bike Friday, an internationally known bicycle manufacturer. ORVA’s Brad Waring said, “It is such an honor to be nominated. Just to be recognized by Travel Lane County gives a real boost to ORVA’s future.”

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Boss Hawg’s wins the Northwest BBQ Competition at Sysco Foodiefest in Portland May 16!

Boss Hawg’s wins the Northwest BBQ Competition at Sysco Foodiefest in Portland May 16!

Posted on 23 May 2012 by admin

Story and photo by Boss Hawg’s
JUNCTION CITY – What an exciting day! We set up the night before and realized we were going up against some stiff competition. Professionals such as Jack Waiboer from the BBQ Network, Burnt Ends BBQ, Big Kahuna’s, Sylvan Steakhouse and Texas Pit BBQ to name a few. No-one would know until 9:30am the following morning what cut of meat we would be smokin’ to keep us all on the same playing field.
When it was announced that it would be Tri Tip, we thought of four different ways we could go about it. We decided to do all four and pick the best one just before judging time (2:30).
It was the Tri Tip with our secret house “Butt Rub” that Tom has been working on for quite some time. We cold smoked our Tri Tip for as long as possible to get a deep smoke ring on it then quickly finished it on the grill. Wow, was that lip smackin’ good!
We felt we had a chance after many of the guests’ had tried samples of all the competitors that were willing to share and had mentioned ours was by far the best. But when they called us up on stage, I think we just really couldn’t believe that the Boss Hawg Team had really done it.
We would like to thank everyone for their support and we look forward to representing Junction City in future competitions.

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Caring about kids

Caring about kids

Posted on 09 May 2012 by admin

By Gini Bramlett
For the Tribune
As a kid growing up in the Midwest in the 1950s and 60s, my free time was an open book. Wide open spaces and stay-at-home moms offered kids the freedom to run amok. Today, for various reasons, kids don’t always have that opportunity, but River Road Parks and Recreation District offers kids the next best thing; the choice to do almost anything their little hearts desire. Afterschool, during school breaks or the summer months, there is something for every child from preschool to teen.
“A typical no school day might be a field trip in the morning and swimming in the afternoon,” said Sondra Buell, Youth Program Director who has been with the district for 20 years.

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Annual Pet Parade just around the corner

Annual Pet Parade just around the corner

Posted on 26 April 2012 by admin

Pre-parade activities include a pet trick contest and a breakfast and bake sale at Viking Sal

by Sayde Moser
for the tribune
JUNCTION CITY – This year marks 59 years that the Business & Professional Women has been putting on the pet parade as a way to get kids involved in their community. And this year, like all the years before it, promises to be tons of fun for the whole family.
The nine categories include small dogs, large dogs, cats, small animals, large animals, feathered pets, costumes, various wheels and bicycles.

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2012 Easter Egg Hunt Photos

2012 Easter Egg Hunt Photos

Posted on 10 April 2012 by admin

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Rewarded for excellence

Rewarded for excellence

Posted on 22 March 2012 by admin

Heather Worley received the first President’s Volunteer Service Award from Coburg Police Department

by Sarah Moser
for the Tribune
Only a few short months ago, the Coburg Police Department partnered with Former President Bush’s Council on Service and Civic Partnership. With this partnership, the department is now able to honor its volunteers with the ?President’s Service Award.’
Heather Worley, a student at Lane Community College in the Criminal Justice program, was the first ever to receive this award from the department.
The purpose of the award, which was established in 2003, is to honor those Americans who are dedicated to volunteering and give them some recognition for their hard work.
During Heather’s three consecutive terms volunteering at the department, she clocked in a total of 616 hours. Initially she started volunteering as part

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