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Going mobile

Posted on 31 October 2012 by admin

Harrisburg seeks input about a possible shuttle service to JC

By Vera Westbrook
For the Tribune

HARRISBURG – The City of Harrisburg invites the public, including Junction City residents, to participate in a survey on the city’s website to determine whether local interest exists in a shuttle service between Harrisburg and Junction City. This survey is the first step in addressing a transportation need for Harrisburg residents.
“That need has to do with providing transportation services to persons who don’t have the ability to get around themselves,” Harrisburg City Administrator Bruce Cleaton said, or for those who prefer to take the bus rather than pay for gas to drive to Eugene or Springfield. Lane Transit District (LTD) buses stop in JC every day except Sunday.
“Our main intent in trying to get the word out via the Tribune is to make people in JC aware of the survey,” Cleaton said, targeting those who may feel the need to get back and forth between the two towns.
During discussions with city staff, LTD indicated no intention of extending bus service to Harrisburg at this time. Instead, LTD suggested that the city provide a shuttle service linking Harrisburg to LTD buses in Junction City.
The proposed shuttle route would follow a loop through the city that would allow riders to get on or off at the following streets: LaSalle, Priceboro, 9th St., Diamond Hill, 7th St., Territorial and 2nd  St. The shuttle would time trips between Harrisburg and Junction City to coordinate with LTD buses.
This survey aims to determine if a need for a shuttle service between the two cities exists. If the need exists, the city can then seek funding sources to support the shuttle. Through survey interest, the city could also estimate the number of shuttle riders who could contribute revenue to pay for all or most of the service.
Although the survey may yield unfavorable results, it will help determine if the service is needed and if the city can make it happen.
Harrisburg residents will receive the survey in the mail with their utility bill at the end of October. The survey can also be accessed from a link on the city website online at www.ci.harrisburg.or.us. Cleaton urges all local residents with transportation interest to complete the survey.
For more information or for a copy of the survey, call Harrisburg City Hall at 541.995.6655, or simply print a copy of the survey off the Internet and mail it to the City of Harrisburg, PO Box 378, Harrisburg, OR, 97446, or fax it to 541.995.9244.
“The shuttle would be something of mutual benefit if we could make it happen,” Cleaton said.

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tooth

H.A.R.T. hosts mobile dental van

Posted on 31 October 2012 by admin

HARRISBURG – On Nov. 5 H.A.R.T. will sponsor a free dental clinic for low income individuals in the Harrisburg area. To qualify individuals need to have no insurance, no means to pay for dental care and are not eligible for OHP. Also, this dental clinic is for those with visible decay or in pain, not for routine check-ups or cleanings. Though the Tri-County area is served, preference is given to children and Harrisburg residents.
Medical Teams International, www.medicalteams.org/ is always in need of donations. Contact the H.A.R.T. Center at 541.995.7700 for an appointment or to donate.
For more information about this or our other programs and services visit www.hartfamilyresourcecenter.org

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PERS rate negotiated

Posted on 17 October 2012 by admin

Harrisburg high school leadership class sets high goals

By Vera Westbrook
For the Tribune
HARRISBURG – Increasing employer contribution rates for the Oregon Public Employees Retirement System (PERS) for the 2013-15 biennium have been negotiated and are compounding the losses already suffered from state education budget reductions seen during the last budget cycle.
Harrisburg School District Business Manager Debbie Darst presented some hard facts affecting the district budget at an Oct. 8 school board meeting after receiving news of the increase.
“For the 2013-15 school years, our combined rate will be 27.42 percent of payroll,” Darst said. “That is an increase of 6.74 percent, which is huge.”
The total increase to the district is estimated at $262,800 for the 2013-14 school year only, with the district already having set aside some money in contingency anticipating the rate increase.
“We estimated our savings including contingency will be about $220,000,” Darst said, a bit shy of the necessary $262,800. However, fiscal prudence dictates that the district maintain some minimum fund balance in contingency as insurance against unforeseen emergencies.
Darst reported that this year’s budget saw a $45,000 increase in the beginning fund balance with another $35,000 saved from employees taking a leave of absence combined with the hiring of less experienced teachers. But the hiring of a special education teacher at the high school will set the district back an additional $50,000.
School districts are eager to see the financial decisions made about education after the State Legislature convenes in January, as some larger school districts are determined to do something about this.
The good news is that additional revenue is expected after the July federal government’s reauthorization of the Secure Rural Schools Act for another year. The district should see funds from federal forest fees within the next few weeks. Last year the district received $54,000 and is expected to get 85 percent of that amount this year, or about $35,000 – $40,000.
Also at the meeting, representatives of the Harrisburg High School student leadership team announced their decision to pursue a ‘Heroes for a Day’ event for foster boys to mirror the ‘Princess for a Day’ event sponsored by the nonprofit organization ‘A Family for Every Child’ that occurs every year for girls in foster care.
“This is something that is not done across the nation,” leadership student Austin Dame said. “This would start here in Harrisburg.”
Students and Leadership instructor Ray White are dreaming big for this event, with plans to invite key male ‘hero’ figures from the community to spend the day mentoring foster boys from 18 months to 18 years old. The class plans to find sponsors to inundate the boys with gifts and manly pleasures to make the day an unforgettable adventure.
“We would love to get this started and be a part of it, as it is all for these foster children,” Dame said.

 

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HB 09.26.12 history website pic

Don’t know much about history?

Posted on 03 October 2012 by mlong

Harrisburg Library’s new Website can let you browse through 400 years of American history

photo by Gini Bramlett
Harrisburg Librarian Cheryl Spangler, offers access to historical documents with a new Web program for the price of a library card.

 
By Gini Bramlett
For The Tribune

 

HARRISBURG – History is a subject that almost everyone has some interest in whether you’re a Civil War Aficionado, following your family tree or just learning about how people lived a few centuries ago. Now, all you have to do is head to the Harrisburg Library to find answers to all your historical questions.
“I have people coming in all the time wanting to know if we have genealogy,” said Librarian Cheryl Spangler. “It’s very popular right now.”
Recently, Spangler was able to get the support she needed from the city to give ‘Newsbank Inc.’ America’s Genealogy Bank a try for a year. The Website is a comprehensive research product containing information from the year 1600 to the present in the United States including actual newspaper clipping of events, the Daughters of the American Revolution (DAR) book with names and medical information of those who served in the military and other historical documents and events through 400 years of American history. The Website is used nationally by universities, military and government libraries, professionals and researchers.
Using the site is as easy as typing in your password.
“You have an $800 Website that you get to use for the price of a library card,” said Spangler.
The site is easy to use and is accessible from your home computer. Cheryl says she will give potential users a week to try it out.
Out-of-area library cards are $25 and free to town residents. The library is located at 354 Smith St. For more information, call 541.995.6949 or email cspangler@ci.harrisburg.or.us.
Library hours are Monday from 3-8:30pm, Tuesday from noon-6pm, Wednesday from noon-6pm, Thursday noon-6pm, Friday 10am-4:30pm and the first and third Saturdays from 2-6pm.

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library_books_5516

City of Harrisburg commits to building new library

Posted on 18 September 2012 by admin

By Sayde Moser
For the Tribune
HARRISBURG – The city council has for quite some time showed an interest in helping build a new library and made that interest an official resolution last week.
The Harrisburg Library Guild has been putting together packets of information to solicit for grants from foundations to cover the construction of a new library. A resolution indicating the city’s intent and financial contributions would help the solicitation process.
The resolution includes providing sufficient land for a new library and parking lot. The land mapped out for the project is located in city-owned property on the south side of Smith Street between 4th Street and the fire station.
It also designates the $160,000 from the sale of the Upmyer House (which the city originally bought with the intention of making it the new library, but later sold for a small profit) to go towards the project. The city also agreed to add an additional $100,000 from the building reserve line of the community and economic development fund towards the library, totaling $260,000 of contributions from the city.
“It will make our city’s contributions towards this project more reasonable to the grant foundations and they will in turn be more likely to approve a grant for this project,” said City Administrator Bruce Cleeton in his staff report.
“Most grants want to see something on your part,” said Library Guild Member LeAnne Hart-Chambers. “They want to see that you are actively pursuing this and the more you are able to contribute on your own, the more likely they will want to jump on the grant wagon and help.”
The total projected cost of the library is 1.13 million. The Library Guild has raised $320,000.
The money promised by the city will remain in a reserve account and if the library project does not proceed as planned or another building project arises, the council can repeal this resolution and use the funds for something else. This would likely result in the loss of any grant funds, if any have been acquired.

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school days

Quiet Dignity…

Posted on 11 September 2012 by admin

Tonya Kropf

Stories and photo by Bill Kunkle
Our children headed off to schools this month to begin an important aspect of their future and to our nation’s well being.
Many entered large buildings with hundreds of students. But some entered little, rural one or two room schools as well.
There is one such school in our area; Lake Creek School a few miles north of Harrisburg on Peoria Road. It is in an area of clean, well-kept farms where quiet dignity stretches as far as the eye can see.
The sound of stillness is interupted by the wind stirring a rustle of cottonwood trees or the soft, melancholy cooing of the turtle dove. It is populated by a people who enjoy vigerous open air, hard work and a rather quiet, simple life. Nature at it’s best!
The school has only 10 students and two teachers. While big, block-long schools get the most attention, Lake Creek is just as important.

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Monster Truck Crashes Into Stands in Harrisburg Oregon

Monster Truck Crashes Into Stands in Harrisburg Oregon

Posted on 02 September 2012 by admin


Video by Dustin Earls
HARRISBURG – On Saturday afternoon, a monster truck injured three people after crashing into the crowd at a monster truck show at the Harrisburg MotorSports Complex just north of town.
The driver of the 950 horsepower 1975 Ford pickup monster truck was identified as 28-year-old Kyle Atchley from Lebanon. He told deputies with the Linn County Sheriff’s Office that the front of the 1970 Ford truck he was driving went over the eight-10-foot dirt barrier after he lost control in a mud hole. The four-feet-tall tractor tires landed on three spectators sitting in folding chairs along the track.
Sheriff Mueller said all three spectators were transported by ambulance to a Eugene hospitals with non-life-threatening injuries.
No criminal charges have been filed.

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school board

Preparing for disaster

Posted on 21 August 2012 by admin

photo by Sayde Moser
School board members Anthony Knox and Wayne Swango, along with Superintendant Brian Wolf, reviewed and accepted the updated emergency preparedness plan, presented by Bob Tatum. The new plan implements ‘shelter-in-place,’ where students and staff stay sheltered at various locations on campus in the event of toxic fumes leaking into the air.

by Sayde Moser
For The Tribune

HARRISBURG – It has been years in the making, but the Harrisburg School Board finally adopted an updated emergency preparedness plan.
The plan was revised and updated by Bob Tatum, coordinator for the Readiness and Emergency Management for Schools Grant and reflects today’s standard for protecting school children and staff from an emergency.
One of the biggest changes to the old emergency plan is a procedure called ‘shelter-in-place.’ It was Tatum’s recommendation that the emergency plan reflect this procedure, where students and staff would shelter-in-place at various locations inside the school buildings in the event of toxic fumes from a truck or train outside affecting the air quality.
If you are in one of the new buildings, shelter-in-place there and shut own the ventilation,” Tatum said. “If you are in the kindergarten, middle school or elementary school buildings, get to the cafeteria or closest new building and shelter there.”
This does propose a challenge for those students and staff members because it requires going outside to get to the cafeteria. Tatum said ideally the school should get a grant to enclose the walkway and eliminate the number of people who might be exposed to toxic fumes.
“Every time I hear shelter-in-place, the hair goes up on the back of my neck,” said Board Member Paul Christensen, stating he would like to see a contingency plan that involved moving to another designated shelter some distance away.
“We have a strong favoritism to shelter-in-place for just about everything and I think there should be contingencies,” he said. “If we can’t shelter-in-place, what is our alternative? I sure don’t want to be stuck sheltering in place because we don’t have an alternative.”
Tatum answered that it is always a case-by-case basis.
“It is always going to be a judgment call,” he said. “I don’t think any emergency plans are intended to overrule common sense. Because there are so many ifs, ands or buts on what could be happening in any situation. You have to make that call; are the kids safer inside or outside?”
The emergency preparedness plan will be reviewed each year by the board.
“I think we have a good plan here, but there is always room for continuous improvement,” Tatum said. “As you see other issues or think about issues, as laws change or you hear about some emergency that happened at another school, we will incorporate those changes and lessons into our plan.”
The school will also run practice tests and have reviews based on each test to tweak or modify the plan as needed. Certain staff members have been given expert training to deal with emergency situations and will be in charge of training the rest of the staff as well as running drills. Debbie Darst will be in charge of maintaining and updating the plan as changes are made.
“Let’s make sure the people in charge are clear on what to do and can delegate in a way that doesn’t cause confusion,” Christensen emphasized.

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City of Harrisburg taking steps to provide transportation for residents

City of Harrisburg taking steps to provide transportation for residents

Posted on 14 August 2012 by admin

HARRISBURG –Providing a bus to Junction City that could connect with the LTD buses to and from Eugene is something that has been on the city council’s plate of ideas for a few months now.
While the project is still in its infant stages, City Administrator Bruce Cleeton has spoken with Harrisburg School District Superintendent Brian Wolf about the possibility of using one of the district’s buses and drivers. Cleeton said that Wolf seemed supportive of the idea and he was asked to attend the school board meeting last Monday to discuss it with the rest of the board.
“At first it didn’t look like we would probably even get it going at all but it sounds like maybe something could happen as far as getting the school’s help to make it move forward,” Councilor Robert Boese said. “It looks very optimistic right now but there are some things that need to be concreted before it can go any further.”
“We still haven’t gotten into the most important part which is seeing if the finances will work out,” Cleeton reminded the council.  “But one important part in trying to see if the finances will work is to get some idea of how much ridership there will be. I am inclined to think the next step we should take before we start trying to crunch some numbers would be to send out a survey or offer it online to find out how much interest there is by the citizens.”
With the blessing of the school district, the city will put together a survey to gage the interest of Harrisburg residents in having a bus service to connect with LTD.
Cleeton said he felt people in Junction City might also benefit from the service, if they work in Harrisburg or if kids in the summertime wanted to use the skate park.
But it’s not set in stone just yet.
“If I were to bet on whether or not it is going to happen, I would still feel comfortable saying that it won’t happen, but we won’t know until we see if the finances will work,” said Cleeton.  “Hopefully if we do a survey and there is considerable interest, that would help us get a grant at least for the first year and then we can work on the finances of supporting it and seeing how much ridership we actually end up getting.”

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To our fine community

To our fine community

Posted on 14 August 2012 by admin

By Steve Rowland
For The Tribune
Your community newspaper, The Tribune News, is here to stay. As you know, our staff and printing and web are supported by advertisers and subscribers. We have now designed our newspaper to flex its pages and content based upon a formula that is composed of the number of ads and the number of subscribers, per each weekly copy. This will give The Tribune News stability and allow it to function for years to come.
The Tribune News staff decided last spring that the printed newspaper must have a website that complements the information we offer our readers—we have done that!
We have enhanced our website to include pictures and stories that don’t fit in the weekly paper. We have found that most readers – and we have approximately 4,000 of them – like to read 200-500 word stories. So, for most stories longer than that, we will put the longer version on our website, www.YourTribuneNews.com. If a longer version of a story is available on YourTribuneNews.com it will be noted at the end of the article in the newspaper.
Also on the website are archived stories and pictures from the past few months of production. This website will grow and so will its information—Check it out.
Thank you all for supporting The Tribune News.

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Screen shot 2012-08-14 at 11.37.00 AM

You’re not alone anymore

Posted on 14 August 2012 by admin

By Gini Bramlett
For the Tribune
None of us are exempt from the pain of losing someone we love. It happens every day. We just hope it doesn’t happen to us anytime soon. But it inevitably does; like it or not.
Sometimes having family around helps through the tough times. Some try and go it alone. But, just as often, there are those who are never able to move on with their lives.
“It’s inevitable that there’s a point when everyone goes home, and you have to shut the door and live your life,” said Brenda Reagh (pronounced Ray), who lost her husband, Ron a little more than a year ago. “That’s where a good support group comes in.”
A new 13-week ‘Stepping Stones of Hope’ GriefShare recovery support group will be starting at Life Bible Church just outside of Harrisburg on Coburg Road across from Detering Orchard. The program, facilitated by Reagh, along with Brenda Buck consists of friendly, caring people who will walk alongside you through one of life’s most difficult experiences. The seminars offer videos, a workbook and group sharing. It is Christian-based but open to anyone.
“The support can come from others who have lost loved ones,” said Reagh. “The class gives you tools to get through every day.”
GriefShare seminars and support groups, of which ‘Stepping Stones of Hope’ is affiliated are led by people who understand what you are going through and want to help.
Reagh is one of those people.
In May of last year, after 35 years of marriage, she lost her husband Ron, age 52 to cancer. When after a reluctant visit to the doctor in March because of a persistent cough, X-rays indicated a spot on his lung.
“Up until the cough, he was perfectly healthy,” said Brenda.
Further testing indicated chemotherapy was necessary. He had undergone his first treatment and became violently ill. The cancer was found throughout his body. He died just two months later.
“I really just felt like God said we all are given a span of time,” Brenda remarked. “It was Ron’s time.”
Brenda always had support from family and friends, but when her husband’s hospice nurse, who is a bereavement counselor, called one evening – the hardest times for a spouse who has lost a partner – she touched and spoke on areas of Brenda’s new reality that only someone who had walked that path could see. That helped  convince her to attend a support group.
“We think our relationship with the person we lost is unique,” Brenda said. “And how could anyone ever relate to what we’re feeling? We’re the ones left here to deal with it. They (loved ones) don’t have any cares of this world anymore.”
Brenda said she learned a lot from the grief support class she took from Hospice. It helped her in talking with others that had walked that journey.
“Now I can help give someone the tools they need to get through their pain.”
The classes are Thursdays from 6-8pm beginning Sept. 13 at Life Bible Church, 21211Coburg Road in Harrisburg. All are welcome to attend any session. Each is ‘self-contained’, so attending in sequence is not required. There is a cost of $20 for the workbook but scholarships are available.
To learn more about GriefShare or to find a meeting location nearest to you, visit www.griefshare.org.

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Country Coach Friendship Rally raises more than $9,000 for local food banks

Country Coach Friendship Rally raises more than $9,000 for local food banks

Posted on 07 August 2012 by admin

photo by Kyle Krenik
Susan Jones of Local Aid in Junction City (left) and Vesta Craiger of God’s Storehouse in Harrisburg (right) were each given a check for $4,816.50 which was raised by Country Couch Friends Incorporated. Gary Wallstrom, a member of CCFI, presented the checks to each food bank. This was the second year in a row that CCFI held a rally at Riverbend in Harrisburg and helped raise money for the foodbanks.

By Sayde Moser
For The Tribune
JUNCTION CITY – Junction City Local Aid Director Susan Jones and Harrisburg’s God’s Storehouse Director Vesta Craiger stood outside Local Aid in Junction City with Gary Wallstrom, a member of Country Coach Friends Incorporated (CCFI), who presented each food bank with a check for $4,816.50.
The money was raised during the second annual Country Coach Friendship Rally, which brought 170 motor coach owners to the area for an entire week. Money was raised through raffle ticket sales and a live auction.
Last year, donations were more than $8,000 to be split between both food banks.
“I told you guys going into this, I didn’t think we could match last year,” Wallstrom said to Susan and Vesta. “I was shocked.”
Both Susan and Vesta were able to give a presentation to the rally attendees, explaining the need for community food banks.
“Junction City Local Aid and God’s Storehouse have been blessed by the generosity of Country Coach Friends Incorporated,” Susan said. “Country Coach owners are very loyal to the brand and we are grateful they have chosen to help out our communities.”
Wallstrom said he chose the two food banks as the recipients of the money raised because while he is a member of CCFI, he is also Chairman of the Marian/Polk Food Share.
“This is very near and dear to my heart,” he said. “Over the years we have supported many great charities but this cause really touches me. In my opinion, in no other non-profit can you measurably see where your money goes. It is very efficient and provides a tremendous need.”
For God’s Storehouse, Vesta said the money would go towards purchasing protein. “The food we get from FOOD for Lane County is wonderful, but we are always low of protein, and the protein we do get doesn’t last long,” She said.
She said she would be purchasing hamburger and other meats, as well as dairy products.
Last year, the money raised helped her fix four leaks in her roof.
Susan said the money for Local Aid would also help fill in food gaps, such as protein. However she is also able to offer assistance in other ways, such as helping with past-due electricity bills. For clients of hers who are living in tents or camp trailers and aren’t hooked up to electricity, she can offer them $20 vouchers for propane at Junction City Farm and Garden.
“That way they can either stay warm, or have a way to cook their food,” she said. “We can go a step beyond just handing them the food, but also give them a way to cook it.”
The annual CCFI rally returns to Oregon each year, near where all the Country Coach motor coaches were built. The organization was formed one year ago at the first rally in Harrisburg and is an international chapter of Family Motor Coach Association. Starting with only 40 members, it now boasts more than 190 members.
The rally is sponsored each year by several local businesses, including Oregon Motorcoach Center, Country Coach Corporation, Guaranty RV Center, Premier RV Services, Bob Dickman Tire Center/ Les Schwab and several others. This year’s main event was held at Riverbend RV Resort in Harrisburg.
“This summer saw a nice return of the larger motor home buyers back to Junction City, where they purchased a motor home originally,” said Shannon Nill of Guaranty. “These folks enjoy our beautiful area and the quality service and sales they get from our area. Premier RV, River Bend, Country Coach, Guaranty and Oregon Motor Coach – across the nation, we are becoming known as the place that has everything the RV customer needs.”
To learn more about CCFI, contact Jerry O’Connor at jerryobus@aol.com.

 

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Screen shot 2012-07-10 at 3.14.27 PM

A challenge of excellence

Posted on 10 July 2012 by admin

photo by Vera Westbrook
Harrisburg High School Leadership students Garrett Sims (left) and Phoenix Null present a summary of 2011-12 school achievements at a June 11 school board meeting that earned the class a Grand Prize certificate from the Oregon Association of Student Councils.

By Vera Westbrook
For the Tribune
HARRISBURG – Teamwork is a powerful tool for success. Eighteen students of the Harrisburg High School Leadership Class experienced success during the 2011-12 school year after proving that school size is insignificant when achieving goals amidst effective teamwork.
After earning a maximum of 245 points during the year for accomplishing a set of daunting goals, the leadership class applied for the Oregon Association of Student Councils (OASC) High School Student Council/Leadership Recognition award, considered ‘the challenge of excellence.’ Harrisburg High won the highest certificate offered—the Grand Prize.
“We received the highest award and we are the smallest school to receive that,” out of nine Oregon schools, said leadership student Phoenix Null during a presentation at the June 11 school board meeting.
Usually larger schools in the Portland and Salem areas earn points for goals achieved within the school setting; but Harrisburg received the highest award for the most points earned for goals accomplished outside the school as well as within.
Leadership instructor Ray White was particularly pleased with an April prom organized for students with severe disabilities sporting a ‘Springtime in Paris’ theme. About 120 students attended complete with formal gowns, a DJ and corsages.
“We had an Eiffel tower that was 8-feet tall; the leadership kids volunteered and did it all,” White said. “If you walked into the room as an outsider, it would have brought tears to your eyes to see the joy!”
Other activities included the Thanksgiving Basket Food Drive, where students raised enough food to fill eight baskets for needy Harrisburg families. For the first time last year, the students entered a float in the annual Light Parade. They also participated in a holiday tree decorating competition and then donated the trees to local families.
The students also helped with the Community Emergency Response Team and the Grassroots Garden. In addition, they also worked with foster children through ‘A Family for Every Child.’

Click here to read more.

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City of Harrisburg looking at ways to provide transportation out of town for residents

Posted on 09 May 2012 by admin

by Sarah Moser
for the Tribune
HARRISBURG – In this economy, owning a car can be a great asset, but with rising gas prices it is expensive just to get around. For folks who live in Harrisburg, where there isn’t a gas station or a grocery store, running basic errands often means going to Junction City or even Eugene.
The Harrisburg City Council has been interested for some time now in getting a bus service for the residents, but there are many options to look at and they all cost a pretty penny, said Councilor Don Shipley.
Shipley and City Administrator Bruce Cleeton met with officials from the Lane Transit District (LTD) to discuss bringing a bus out to Harrisburg.
“They didn’t think it was a real good or practical idea,” Shipley said. “They said they would do it, but it cost money.”
LTD recommended the city get a small van that could connect with the LTD bus in Junction City, much like the one Monroe had until it was canceled for lack of funding. LTD makes five runs a day on the weekdays and two on Saturday to Junction City.

Click here to read more.

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