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Called to serve

Posted on 31 October 2012 by admin

Risking her life more than once, Joyce Beck was called to teach people about God in Ghana

By Gini Bramlett
For the Tribune

JUNCTION CITY – Everyone has a story. Any journalist will tell you that. You just have to ask the right questions and most people will tell you things that might surprise you. And, Joyce Beck, a volunteer at Viking Sal Senior Center in Junction City who will be 80 is March, has one that might astound.
Joyce spent several years in Ghana, Africa as a missionary. That in itself isn’t so amazing, since most of us know dedicated people who have spent years as missionaries around the world with various organizations and churches. Joyce’s story is a little different.
She was called by the voice of God, but she refused to listen.
Joyce says she hesitates to tell people this since she thinks people will believe she is crazy, but Joyce says she did hear His voice back in the early 80s telling her to go to Africa. And, she argued with Him for a long time.
“I had reservations,” she said. She had just completed Bible School. It took her a year to decide.
Shortly after arriving in Africa, she was robbed. She was left with $60.
“I stayed two years and never had need of anything,” said Joyce. “God supplied everything.” She had just one dime left to call her daughter to pick her up at the airport when she got home.
She also had everything she when she got home.
She also had everything she owned stolen at one point, so she wore native garments during her stay. When she returned home, she went to schools displaying some of the clothing and gifts she’d received.
While in Ghana, she went from village to village teaching people about the Lord, staying in homes of the people and ultimately immersing herself in their culture and learning their languages. She also taught young children in nursery schools. At the church, she answered letters for people and prayed for them.
“I learned the languages by singing their songs. I’d win them over and they’d really listen to me.”
“They’d bring me big plates of food,” Joyce said. “They’d bring sick babies and I’d pray over them and they’d get well. The people there practiced voodoo and were used to giving something in return, so she’d ask for a glass of water.
“I’d stick my finger in it and touch their babies. I was really praying, but they were used to voodoo doctors who would ask them for something.”
While being there was an amazing experience for her, there were times when her very life was at stake. At one point she contracted cholera and was deathly ill. Another time gangs had a turf war where she rented a house from the church.
“Unfortunately, I wasn’t home or they would have killed me,” said Joyce. “I could have been killed I don’t know how many times. I’ve lost count, but my heavenly Father took care of me.”
She said that in spite of having no experience preaching in front of people, she was put in the position to do just that often.
“I wouldn’t know what to say,” said Joyce. “But the Lord would tell me what to say.” She was asked to preach to a group at a gathering of churches at a beach where more than 10,000 people were baptized.
In all, Joyce had two trips to Africa staying a total of about three years. She still has African friends who contact her. Some have even come to visit her.
Joyce will be 80 years old in March. She can no longer help in kitchen at Viking Sal preparing lunches like she used to. She’s served on the Viking Sal Advisory Board and has served as a senior companion in Eugene.
Now, she thinks it may be about time to leave Junction City and live near her youngest son in Idaho. But for now, three times a week Joyce still has lunch at Viking Sal with friends.
She says she doesn’t regret a minute of her experiences in Africa telling people about the Lord, even though at times, she’d risked her life.
“I wouldn’t trade that now for anything.”

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bus

Going mobile

Posted on 31 October 2012 by admin

Harrisburg seeks input about a possible shuttle service to JC

By Vera Westbrook
For the Tribune

HARRISBURG – The City of Harrisburg invites the public, including Junction City residents, to participate in a survey on the city’s website to determine whether local interest exists in a shuttle service between Harrisburg and Junction City. This survey is the first step in addressing a transportation need for Harrisburg residents.
“That need has to do with providing transportation services to persons who don’t have the ability to get around themselves,” Harrisburg City Administrator Bruce Cleaton said, or for those who prefer to take the bus rather than pay for gas to drive to Eugene or Springfield. Lane Transit District (LTD) buses stop in JC every day except Sunday.
“Our main intent in trying to get the word out via the Tribune is to make people in JC aware of the survey,” Cleaton said, targeting those who may feel the need to get back and forth between the two towns.
During discussions with city staff, LTD indicated no intention of extending bus service to Harrisburg at this time. Instead, LTD suggested that the city provide a shuttle service linking Harrisburg to LTD buses in Junction City.
The proposed shuttle route would follow a loop through the city that would allow riders to get on or off at the following streets: LaSalle, Priceboro, 9th St., Diamond Hill, 7th St., Territorial and 2nd  St. The shuttle would time trips between Harrisburg and Junction City to coordinate with LTD buses.
This survey aims to determine if a need for a shuttle service between the two cities exists. If the need exists, the city can then seek funding sources to support the shuttle. Through survey interest, the city could also estimate the number of shuttle riders who could contribute revenue to pay for all or most of the service.
Although the survey may yield unfavorable results, it will help determine if the service is needed and if the city can make it happen.
Harrisburg residents will receive the survey in the mail with their utility bill at the end of October. The survey can also be accessed from a link on the city website online at www.ci.harrisburg.or.us. Cleaton urges all local residents with transportation interest to complete the survey.
For more information or for a copy of the survey, call Harrisburg City Hall at 541.995.6655, or simply print a copy of the survey off the Internet and mail it to the City of Harrisburg, PO Box 378, Harrisburg, OR, 97446, or fax it to 541.995.9244.
“The shuttle would be something of mutual benefit if we could make it happen,” Cleaton said.

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Skate Park – skater

Officially Open

Posted on 31 October 2012 by admin

By Kyle Krenik
The Tribune News

JUNCTION CITY – The Junction City Skate Park represents a 13+ year community-wide dream for youth to recreate in a positive and safe environment. The 1,500 square foot park offers street style and ramp based skateboard opportunities for all skill levels.
On Saturday Junction City Mayor David Brunscheon Helped cut the ribon marking the offical opening of The Junction City Skate Park.
In a few weeks a park bench will be installed  near the skate park and will be dedicated to Julius Schmidt, an avid skateboarder who was hit and killed by a train last month.

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Should we ignore or do something?

Should we ignore or do something?

Posted on 31 October 2012 by admin

This past Wednesday, a woman tells a local store owner that she saw two men dressed in black, checking the doors on his store in the early morning hours. She asked the store owner, “Should I have called the police?”
Where has all the common sense gone? Are we afflicted with a virus of apathy?
At The Tribune News we have been asking for involvement from our local high schools for about two years now, and no matter on what level we ask—top, bottom or middle—we get no positive action.
We’ve tried to get this message to the schools but we hadn’t succeeded in getting anyone’s ear until a parent sent an email copy of our frustration to a teacher.
Here’s what the teacher/advisor wrote to us, “If you [The Tribune News] would like high school journalists to help you, then I suggest you take an ad in our school publication, or put your query in to the student announcements.” ??
Whatever happened to a school taking an opportunity to work with a local business for the benefit of the students and the school overall? Am I to understand that the school is run by students and not the guiding wisdom of teachers/administration?
We offer an opportunity for students, many of whom should be encouraged by the school, to participate and get published with an additional venue to their school newspaper. This is an opportunity for a student to get ‘clips’ that they can add to their resume. This is their opportunity to work ‘in the real world’ and increase literary skills, especially if they would like to pursue a career that involves any type of writing. The Tribune News is offering them space that we pay for—to enhance their education and to inform their community.
I ask the schools, “Isn’t a happy community, a community that sees education working outside the bricks more likely to vote positive on tax increases?” I sincerely believe that people pay for value, especially when they understand it.
For parents who want more information about schools and school activities and school sports we ask you to consider the action of the above parent who did get a response. That parent needs your help to work for positive change to get students involved in a real world environment. The Tribune News is offering, at its expense, a venue for our students that is beneficial to them and their community.
Perhaps if more parents would get involved we could bring the schools back into our local paper. This is your newspaper. You, the parent, the reader, can shape its course.

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Taylor

Goodbye Junction City – Hello Ecuador!

Posted on 31 October 2012 by admin

photo by Michelle Long

In a meeting with The Tribune News, Mr. Taylor, the operator, for Love In The Air Llc. announced his intentions to liquidate and close the company.  Mr. Taylor stated they have had a great couple of years in Junction City, but it was time to move to the next phase of their business plan.
The company next phase is to move to Ecuador and convert to a U.S. nonprofit organization, dedicated to funding small local U.S. charities and fraternal organizations who have specific programs serving our core groups, i.e. children, women, senior citizen and U.S. Military personnel and their families.
As an example, Mr. Taylor named several local organizations in Junction City, which would qualify in the future. His list included, J.C. Lions vision eye care program, Education Together Foundation and Local Aid. Mr. Taylor stated they were starting their liquidation sale Oct. 31. When asked why liquidate before two major holidays, Mr. Taylor said they still wanted to give back to the community and this was the best way.  He also said that all the jewelry would be 50 percent off and the Alpaca and Llama apparel would be discounted 30 percent.
Anybody who has shopped at Love In The Air, know they already have the lowest prices in the valley. Mr. Taylor stated everything would be sold; tables, displays and miscellaneous office items.
Mr. Taylor also wanted to thank The Tribune News and Steve Rowland for all the support in making Love In The Air Llc. possible. All the people at the Tribune News have been wonderful, and the business could not have had any better group of people to share our space.
Mr. Taylor would like to thank all the people who have supported his efforts by purchasing jewelry and Alpaca apparel – they have been fantastic!

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tooth

H.A.R.T. hosts mobile dental van

Posted on 31 October 2012 by admin

HARRISBURG – On Nov. 5 H.A.R.T. will sponsor a free dental clinic for low income individuals in the Harrisburg area. To qualify individuals need to have no insurance, no means to pay for dental care and are not eligible for OHP. Also, this dental clinic is for those with visible decay or in pain, not for routine check-ups or cleanings. Though the Tri-County area is served, preference is given to children and Harrisburg residents.
Medical Teams International, www.medicalteams.org/ is always in need of donations. Contact the H.A.R.T. Center at 541.995.7700 for an appointment or to donate.
For more information about this or our other programs and services visit www.hartfamilyresourcecenter.org

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Wetland

Wetland issue moves up the ladder

Posted on 31 October 2012 by admin

Local landowners continue to the county level to be heard

photo by Kyle Krenik
About 120 property owners with canals running through their land in Junction City don’t agree with additional regulations added to already state-protected waterways. The Central Canal off Oak St. is one of the three canals. Local residents plan to take the matter before the Lane County Board of Commissioners at a Dec. 4 meeting.

By Vera Westbrook
For the Tribune
JUNCTION CITY – ‘You can’t please anybody sometimes,’ is a befitting slogan for Junction City after the city council recently approved new regulations governing three ditches running through town: the Eastern, Western and Central canals.
These canals were designated low priority wetlands in a local wetland inventory that was required by the state as part of JC’s 20- year Comprehensive Plan, a document that must be co-adopted by the county and approved by the state for future development to occur around town.
Although the state doesn’t require that low priority wetlands be locally regulated, the city‘s planning staff recommended wetland regulations to the planning commission and the city council.  Property owner ‘GMH’ Hanavan said she hasn’t been able to get a satisfactory answer as to why the city needed the new regulations.
Most of the private property owners who own the land through which the canals run don’t like the city’s
decision to add what they feel are unnecessary local wetland regulations in addition to already sufficient state regulation of the canals.  They also disagree with the designation of the canals as wetlands.
Hanavan interpreted the new regulations as allowing pre-existing improvements to remain in and/or near the wetland designated areas, while requiring property owners to comply with the new wetland regulations for future improvements.
“Before, we always had the right to make an application to the state to put a culvert in the ditch for the water to run through; we could have filled over a culvert so we could walk across it, have a lawn or plant a garden over it,” Hanavan said. “Under these new regulations, people could never have a culvert, as the canals would always have to remain as
open waterways.”
Petitions with more than 200 signatures were submitted to the planning commission objecting to the new wetland regulations prior to the final city council vote that rejected making any changes. Landowners are now taking the matter a step further.
“We don’t want these regulations on our private land,” Hanavan said.  “The city wouldn’t listen to us, so we are now asking the county commissioners to listen to us.”
Hanavan and other property owners are sending letters to the Lane County Planning Commission and the Board of Lane County Commissioners. They are also preparing testimony to bring before the county commissioners at a public hearing scheduled for Dec. 4. If the county won’t listen, the landowners are ready to mount their campaign at the state level.
To hear what city staff and city officials have to say about the subject, be sure to follow the continuation of this story in next week’s issue of the Tribune News.

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Screen shot 2012-10-28 at 12.10.17 AM

NWS WEST COAST/ALASKA TSUNAMI ADVISORY

Posted on 28 October 2012 by admin

The National Weather Service now says that a tsunami ADVISORY has been
 expanded to include northern California and southern Oregon. Bear in mind, 
this is an advisory, NOT a warning. An advisory means a tsunami capable of 
producing strong currents or waves dangerous to people near the water is expected.





PUBLIC TSUNAMI MESSAGE NUMBER 8
NWS WEST COAST/ALASKA TSUNAMI WARNING CENTER PALMER AK
1153 PM PDT SAT OCT 27 2012

THE ADVISORY REGIONS ARE KEPT THE SAME.
NEW OBSERVATIONS ARE ADDED BELOW

...THE TSUNAMI ADVISORY CONTINUES IN EFFECT FOR THE COASTAL
   AREAS OF CALIFORNIA AND OREGON FROM GUALALA POINT
   CALIFORNIA/LOCATED 80 MILES NW OF SAN FRANCISCO/ TO
   DOUGLAS-LANE COUNTY LINE OREGON/10 MILES SW OF FLORENCE/...

...THE TSUNAMI ADVISORY CONTINUES IN EFFECT FOR THE COASTAL
   AREAS OF BRITISH COLUMBIA AND ALASKA FROM THE
   WASHINGTON-BRITISH COLUMBIA BORDER TO CAPE DECISION
   ALASKA/LOCATED 85 MILES SE OF SITKA/...

...THIS MESSAGE IS INFORMATION ONLY FOR COASTAL AREAS OF
   CALIFORNIA FROM THE CALIFORNIA-MEXICO BORDER TO GUALALA
   POINT CALIFORNIA/LOCATED 80 MILES NW OF SAN FRANCISCO/...

...THIS MESSAGE IS INFORMATION ONLY FOR COASTAL AREAS OF
   OREGON AND WASHINGTON FROM DOUGLAS-LANE COUNTY LINE
   OREGON/10 MILES SW OF FLORENCE/ TO THE WASHINGTON-BRITISH
   COLUMBIA BORDER...

...THIS MESSAGE IS INFORMATION ONLY FOR COASTAL AREAS OF
   ALASKA FROM CAPE DECISION ALASKA/LOCATED 85 MILES SE OF
   SITKA/ TO ATTU ALASKA...

A TSUNAMI ADVISORY MEANS THAT A TSUNAMI CAPABLE OF PRODUCING
STRONG CURRENTS OR WAVES DANGEROUS TO PEOPLE IN OR VERY NEAR
THE WATER IS EXPECTED.  SIGNIFICANT WIDESPREAD INUNDATION
IS NOT EXPECTED FOR AREAS UNDER AN ADVISORY.  CURRENTS
MAY BE HAZARDOUS TO SWIMMERS... BOATS... AND COASTAL
STRUCTURES AND MAY CONTINUE FOR SEVERAL HOURS AFTER THE
INITIAL WAVE ARRIVAL.

AT 804 PM PACIFIC DAYLIGHT TIME ON OCTOBER 27 AN EARTHQUAKE WITH
PRELIMINARY MAGNITUDE 7.7 OCCURRED 25 MILES/40 KM SOUTH OF
SANDSPIT BRITISH COLUMBIA.
THIS EARTHQUAKE HAS GENERATED A TSUNAMI WHICH COULD CAUSE DAMAGE
TO REGIONS IN A WARNING OR ADVISORY.
ESTIMATED TSUNAMI ARRIVAL TIMES AND MAPS ALONG WITH SAFETY RULES
AND OTHER INFORMATION CAN BE FOUND ON THE WEB SITE
WCATWC.ARH.NOAA.GOV.

MEASUREMENTS OR REPORTS OF TSUNAMI ACTIVITY

 LOCATION                   LAT    LON     TIME        AMPL
 ------------------------  -----  ------  -------     -----------
 DART46419PT NW SEATTLE    48.8N  129.6W  0345UTC   00.2FT/00.07M
 CRAIG  AK                 55.5N  133.1W  0446UTC   00.3FT/00.10M
 PORT ALEXANDER  AK        56.2N  134.6W  0533UTC   00.4FT/00.14M
 WINTER HARBOUR  BC        50.7N  128.3W  0400UTC   00.5FT/00.16M
 SITKA  AK                 57.1N  135.3W  0425UTC   00.3FT/00.09M
 ELFIN COVE  AK            58.2N  136.3W  0448UTC   00.2FT/00.07M
 SITKA  AK                 57.1N  135.3W  0525UTC   00.3FT/00.09M
 YAKUTAT  AK               59.5N  139.7W  0523UTC   00.4FT/00.12M
 CHARLESTON  OR            43.3N  124.3W  0524UTC   00.3FT/00.09M
 GARIBALDI  OR             45.6N  123.9W  0515UTC   00.2FT/00.05M
 LA PUSH  WA               47.5N  124.4W  0448UTC   00.4FT/00.13M
 NEAH BAY  WA              48.4N  124.6W  0530UTC   00.3FT/00.10M
 PORT ORFORD  OR           42.7N  124.5W  0525UTC   00.5FT/00.15M
 SOUTH BEACH  OR           44.6N  124.0W  0524UTC   00.3FT/00.09M
 WESTPORT  WA              46.9N  124.1W  0550UTC   00.3FT/00.10M
 YAKUTAT  AK               59.5N  139.7W  0520UTC   00.3FT/00.08M
 ARENA COVE  CA            38.9N  123.7W  0637UTC   01.3FT/00.41M
 CRESCENT CITY  CA         41.7N  124.2W  0602UTC   00.8FT/00.23M
 NORTH SPIT  CA            40.8N  124.2W  0545UTC   00.3FT/00.09M
 SEWARD  AK                60.1N  149.4W  0600UTC   00.5FT/00.16M

TIME - TIME OF MEASUREMENT
AMPL - TSUNAMI AMPLITUDES ARE MEASURED RELATIVE TO NORMAL SEA LEVEL.
       IT IS ...NOT... CREST-TO-TROUGH WAVE HEIGHT.
       VALUES ARE GIVEN IN BOTH METERS/M/ AND FEET/FT/.

TSUNAMIS CAN BE DANGEROUS WAVES THAT ARE NOT SURVIVABLE. WAVE
HEIGHTS ARE AMPLIFIED BY IRREGULAR SHORELINE AND ARE DIFFICULT TO
FORECAST. TSUNAMIS OFTEN APPEAR AS A STRONG SURGE AND MAY BE
PRECEDED BY A RECEDING WATER LEVEL.  MARINERS IN WATER DEEPER
THAN 600 FEET SHOULD NOT BE AFFECTED BY A TSUNAMI. WAVE HEIGHTS
WILL INCREASE RAPIDLY AS WATER SHALLOWS. TSUNAMIS ARE A SERIES OF
OCEAN WAVES WHICH CAN BE DANGEROUS FOR SEVERAL HOURS AFTER THE
INITIAL WAVE ARRIVAL. DO NOT RETURN TO EVACUATED AREAS UNTIL AN
ALL CLEAR IS GIVEN BY LOCAL CIVIL AUTHORITIES.

PACIFIC COASTAL REGIONS OUTSIDE CALIFORNIA/ OREGON/ WASHINGTON/
BRITISH COLUMBIA AND ALASKA SHOULD REFER TO THE PACIFIC TSUNAMI
WARNING CENTER MESSAGES FOR INFORMATION ON THIS EVENT AT
PTWC.WEATHER.GOV.

THIS MESSAGE WILL BE UPDATED IN 60 MINUTES OR SOONER IF
THE SITUATION WARRANTS. THE TSUNAMI MESSAGE WILL REMAIN
IN EFFECT UNTIL FURTHER NOTICE. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION STAY TUNED
TO NOAA WEATHER RADIO... YOUR LOCAL TV OR RADIO STATIONS... OR SEE
THE WEB SITE WCATWC.ARH.NOAA.GOV.

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Screen shot 2012-10-24 at 4.02.36 PM

MISSING/ENDANGERED PERSON WANTED Solomon James Delgado

Posted on 24 October 2012 by admin

On 10/23/2012 Solomon James Delgado was reported to be missing by family members. Delgado was last seen on Monday, October 22nd, 2012 at around 12:00pm at 881 W 6th Ave, Junction City. Delgado left this location with all of his belongings and has not been heard from since. At this time there is no known clothing description and no known direction of travel. He is believed to possible frequent in the past the Eugene and Beaverton Oregon areas.
In addition, Delgado is wanted by the State of Oregon Youth Authority for unauthorized use of a motor vehicle.
If you see Solomon James Delgardo or have information pertaining to this subject or his whereabouts, please call Junction City Police Department at 541 998-1245 with any information or your local police department if seen.

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Screen shot 2012-10-23 at 11.10.45 PM

JC Skatepark opens after more than decade of planning

Posted on 24 October 2012 by admin

By Vera Westbrook
For the Tribune

JUNCTION CITY – After years of hard work, members of the JC Skatepark Development Committee will finally see the fruit of their labor payoff, as the JC skatepark holds its opening celebration on Saturday, Oct. 27, from noon to 2pm at the park located on Laurel St. and W. 14thAve.

As far as park construction is concerned, “We are pretty well done with the major construction aspects,” said JC Public Works Director Jason Knope at an Oct. 10 meeting.

Knope added that the city decided to seed the park with grass after receiving an offer for the job that cost about half the price of placing rock in the park. Irrigation was also installed. Knope said the sidewalk along the park would be done as well.

Community Services Department Director Melissa Bowers reported that sponsors for the event have been contacted and she was expecting a favorable turn out.

“We’ll have the ribbon and the big scissors with snipping occurring at noon,” Bowers said.

Tactics Board Shop from Eugene will set up a tent and hold a brief skate-team demonstration on top of coordinating a contest. Western Beverage Company agreed to bring a van to work from during the event. Both companies will bring loads of items to give away including Monster drink logo items, beverages and skate logo items. The Tony Hawk Foundation offered resources for giveaways as well.

“We have prizes, we have exhibitions, we have free product giveaways,” Councilor Randy Nelson said, who suggested the festivities should be held around the south area between the gazebo and Laurel Ave.

The committee expects a big turnout at the event with patrons coming from Eugene and Portland to partake in grand opening festivities, having heard about the park online. The grand opening will take place rain or shine.

Bowers also created a flyer to send out to all the local schools and skateparks as far as Veneta and Willamalane Park in Springfield.

After hashing out last minute opening details, the committee was content with the opening date and excited about a successful event. Completion of the skatepark is a major milestone for the city and big accomplishment for Councilor Randy Nelson, who’s been working on the project for the last 13 years.

“It’s so close you can taste it,” Nelson said.

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Called to serve

Posted on 24 October 2012 by admin

Risking her life more than once, Joyce Beck was called to teach people about God in Ghana

By Gini Bramlett
For the Tribune

 Junction City – Everyone has a story. Any journalist will tell you that. You just have to ask the right questions and most people will tell you things that might surprise you. And, Joyce Beck, a volunteer at Viking Sal Senior Center in Junction City who will be 80 is March, has one that might astound.

Joyce spent several years in Ghana, Africa as a missionary. That in itself isn’t so amazing, since most of us know dedicated people who have spent years as missionaries around the world with various organizations and churches. Joyce’s story is a little different.

She was called by the voice of God, but she refused to listen.

Joyce says she hesitates to tell people this since she thinks people will believe she is crazy, but Joyce says she did hear His voice back in the early 80s telling her to go to Africa. And, she argued with Him for a long time.

“I had reservations,” she said. She had just completed Bible School. It took her a year to decide.

Shortly after arriving in Africa, she was robbed. She was left with $60.

“I stayed two years and never had need of anything,” said Joyce. “God supplied everything.” She had just one dime left to call her daughter to pick her up at the airport when she got home.

She also had everything she owned stolen at one point, so she wore native garments during her stay. When she returned home, she went to schools displaying some of the clothing and gifts she’d received.

While in Ghana, she went from village to village teaching people about the Lord, staying in homes of the people and ultimately immersing herself in their culture and learning their languages. She also taught young children in nursery schools. At the church, she answered letters for people and prayed for them.

“I learned the languages by singing their songs. I’d win them over and they’d really listen to me.”

“They’d bring me big plates of food,” Joyce said. “They’d bring sick babies and I’d pray over them and they’d get well. The people there practiced voodoo and were used to giving something in return, so she’d ask for a glass of water.

“I’d stick my finger in it and touch their babies. I was really praying, but they were used to voodoo doctors who would ask them for something.”

While being there was an amazing experience for her, there were times when her very life was at stake. At one point she contracted cholera and was deathly ill. Another time gangs had a turf war where she rented a house from the church.

“Unfortunately, I wasn’t home or they would have killed me,” said Joyce. “I could have been killed I don’t know how many times. I’ve lost count, but my heavenly Father took care of me.”

She said that in spite of having no experience preaching in front of people, she was put in the position to do just that often.

“I wouldn’t know what to say,” said Joyce. “But the Lord would tell me what to say.” She was asked to preach to a group at a gathering of churches at a beach where more than 10,000 people were baptized.

In all, Joyce had two trips to Africa staying a total of about three years. She still has African friends who contact her. Some have even come to visit her.

Joyce will be 80 years old in March. She can no longer help in kitchen at Viking Sal preparing lunches like she used to. She’s served on the Viking Sal Advisory Board and has served as a senior companion in Eugene.

Now, she thinks it may be about time to leave Junction City and live near her youngest son in Idaho. But for now, three times a week Joyce still has lunch at Viking Sal with friends.

She says she doesn’t regret a minute of her experiences in Africa telling people about the Lord, even though at times, she’d risked her life.

“I wouldn’t trade that now for anything.”

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pix2

Birds and bees still buzzing in JC

Posted on 24 October 2012 by admin

JC commissioners draft proposed ordinance for fowl and bees

 by Vera Westbrook
for the Tribune

JUNCTION CITY – After being sent back to committee by the city council, the topic of allowing fowl and bees within the city limits had members of the JC Planning Commission brainstorming to come up with provisional regulations at an Oct. 16 meeting.

Interim City Planner Stacy Clauson gathered background information from other Oregon cities and distributed the material to commissioners to assist in drafting the ordinance. She also provided the recommendations prepared by City Administrator Kevin Watson that were previously presented to the city council.

“I want to look at what those regulations were, to look at what was proposed as it went forward to the city council, and then to see what your recommendation would be for an ordinance if we were to draft something for your review for the next meeting,” Clauson said.

Issues discussed included roosters, hen density, permits, lot size and bee colony density. Preliminary recommendations considered at the meeting are presented below.

Commissioners discussed allowing chickens for single-family dwellings in R1 and R2 zones. They also decided on a density of five hens per residence with no roosters.

Regarding permits, Clauson said, “It was the city manager’s recommendation not to have a permitting process, as it would take a lot of staff resources that we probably wouldn’t recoup in fees.” Commissioners decided not to recommend issuing permits.

Setbacks for chicken coops and runs from property lines and from adjoining residents were also discussed. Commissioners decided to stay in compliance with the standard setbacks already in place, with a 6-foot side-yard setback and a 15-foot setback for backyards. Alley lots would have no setbacks on the road side for the run and the coop.

Chickens also would be kept for personal use only and not for commercial use and they could not be slaughtered commercially. The same rules for chickens would also apply to ducks and other fowl.

Visiting the more complicated issue of bees, commissioners decided on limiting two colonies per city lot. The consensus for bees was to require education for beekeeping with educational certificates to be presented to the city. Beekeepers would also be required to supply a notice to neighbors living within 150 feet from their property lines.

A 6-foot fence or hedge for a bee flyaway area would be required as would a 10-foot setback from the rear or side property lines. Zoning would be the same as for chickens.

After collecting preliminary information, Clauson said she would return with draft provisions for an ordinance by the next meeting for further review by commissioners. Upon drafting a proposal, the planning commission will be seeking public feedback before sending the proposed ordinance to the city council.

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Forward movement in two major Coburg projects

Forward movement in two major Coburg projects

Posted on 24 October 2012 by admin

The first segment of loop path begins and wastewater project in final phase

 

By Vera Westbrook
For the Tribune

COBURG – Several major projects in the Coburg area are seeing forward movement, with construction of a multi-use path, a wastewater treatment plant and improvements to the I-5 Interchange well underway.

Called the Coburg Loop Path, the project proposes “a 10-foot-wide hard-surface path system that goes in and around the city of Coburg” connecting key areas in town, said City Administrator Petra Schuetz. The concrete path is intended for pedestrians and bicyclists and will be separated from the road. “We are building the first two segments right now.”

The first segment of the path is currently under construction with the Coburg I-5 interchange improvement project. The second part of the path is in the engineering phase and will be a northern extension of the first path system with building plans for next year. The city is currently applying for funding to build the third segment of the path near the Coburg Community Charter School.

The path under current construction is on the west side of the I-5 interchange beginning at Pearl St. and then running south about a quarter mile on the realigned South Coburg Industrial Way to intersect with Roberts Rd.

The second part of the path planned for next year will head north from Pearl St. up toward the newly named, ‘Coburg North’ light industrial area. It then heads west to Sarah Lane to connect to the residential neighborhood.

“The residential connection is essential, as this path system was community designed,” Schuetz said, which will allow residents and visitors to access the path much easier. “The residential connection is also the beginning of two ‘bike boulevard’ routes, which will cross town to make connections with other segments of the path over time.”

The third segment will improve the intersection at the Coburg Elementary School location with a possible path alignment south of Van Duyn Rd. along Coburg Bottom Loop.

“This effort also addresses a need for more balanced local transportation options and a beautiful, safe recreational amenity,” Schuetz said, as people should have options to move around without cars. “We are trying to use the existing public infrastructure more efficiently.”

Although path construction may be well underway, the entire project is a 20-year plan with some constraints.

“One of the constraints is that we are unable to build portions of the plan that are outside the Urban Growth Boundary/City limits,” Schuetz said, but ultimately the path will align with city expansion.

A fourth path segment planned for the distant future will complete the North Coburg Industrial Way extension to Coburg Wetlands Park.

In addition to the Coburg Loop, the City is developing bid documents in November for the ‘hook-up’ or Phase IV of the wastewater project—that’s the final phase where the pipes are hooked up to individual septic tanks.

“We have put all the pipe in the ground in the public right-of-way, and the wastewater treatment plant will be finished by the end of winter,” Schuetz said. “We will be hooking up the first business property to the treatment plant on Apr. 1.”

For more information about the Coburg Loop Path, the Coburg Wastewater Project and other major projects, visit the City of Coburg’s website at www.CoburgOregon.org

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JCPD Drug Buster

Posted on 17 October 2012 by admin

JC police officer gets re-certified as drug recognition expert

photo by Vera Westbrook
As a drug recognition expert, Junction City Police Officer Brian Paterson wears a stethoscope around his neck that he uses when determining the cause of a driver’s impairment. He says that marijuana tops the list of drugs that people get pulled over for while driving under the influence.

By Vera Westbrook
For the Tribune

JUNCTION CITY – Alcohol isn’t the only substance that causes people to drive recklessly. Prescriptions, illicit drugs and even illnesses can impair a driver as well, making it tough for police officers to determine the cause of impairment. To determine the cause, an expert is often consulted for advice.
Officer Brian Paterson is the JC Police Department expert who assists with impairment identification. Paterson was trained as a drug recognition expert (DRE) in 2010 and was recently recertified. When a driver fails a roadside test but doesn’t register on an alcohol intoxilyzor machine, Paterson comes in to examine the individual.
“My job as a DRE is to decide if the person is impaired, and if so, is the impairment because of drugs or is it medical?” he said.
Paterson spends about an hour using a specific protocol to test for seven categories of drugs. If the cause is medical like diabetes, a paramedic may need to be called; if the cause is drugs, the drug needs to be identified.
“It’s a 12-step standardized examination process that we go through, where we talk with the person, talk with the arresting officer and run the person through standard roadside tests again,” Paterson said. He also performs clinical tests such as reading blood pressure and determining eye pupil size under different lighting conditions.
“Based on all of this we have a matrix that we use where we put all the signs and symptoms together to see what a driver is under the influence of,” Paterson said. A sample of the driver’s urine is then sent to the Oregon State Police crime lab to verify the determination.
Out of almost 50 states, Europe and Canada who use the program, “Oregon’s DRE program always rates in the top three worldwide as far as quality of accuracy of calls,” Paterson said, along with Washington and Arizona. “The Oregon State Police run a really good program,” with other states often calling on Oregon instructors for training.
But becoming a DRE is not easy. Once accepted into the program, an officer attends a training school for two weeks. “The training is delivered by police officers, doctors and different professionals to teach you about how different drugs affect the system.” Extensive memorization of physiology and pharmacology is involved.
After passing the school, the officers must then pass a practical field test where they examine actual drug users to test for accurate drug determinations. A daylong written exam is than taken, and once passed, an officer is certified as a DRE. Only one percent of police officers are DREs, so Paterson helps other departments in the area as well.
Since certification as a DRE in 2010, Paterson has made 93 evaluations with an accuracy rate in the upper 90 percentile. Although he may be highly accurate, all his evaluations are still verified with an area coordinator for quality control.
Paterson, who’s had extensive law enforcement training in SWAT, Taser, patrol rifle and less lethal training, considers DRE training “by far the most demanding training I’ve ever done in law enforcement. It was hard!”

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A generation of accountability

Posted on 17 October 2012 by admin

Laurel’s recent school designation opens doors to improvement

By Vera Westbrook
For the Tribune

Laurel Elementary School students will see some changes soon with its new designation as a Focus School, as the state will provide funds and training to assist educators in making improvements

JUNCTION CITY – Laurel Elementary School is on the way to reaping the benefits of an amended education act that aims to consolidate state initiatives with federal requirements. Laurel’s recent Focus School designation has opened the door to federal funding that targets increasing growth in learning.
In July, the federal government granted Oregon approval for its Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA) application, a waiver from the No Child Left Behind (NCLB) Act that plans to assist Oregon schools in increasing accountability and meeting the needs of students.
This flexibility waiver will help Oregon reach its 40-40-20 goal to increase the level of education of all state citizens. States will receive more tools to support schools through a new rating system that replaces the federal Adequate Yearly Progress sanctions of NCLB.
The waiver created an accountability system to rate Elementary schools by academic achievement, academic growth and subgroup growth. Laurel is one of 95 Oregon Title 1 schools identified in July that will receive support and intervention from the state to help increase student achievement and close persistent achievement gaps.
As a Title 1 school with a population of nearly 60 percent economically disadvantaged students, Laurel will receive additional state support to increase yearly learning growth for subgroups. These subgroups include English language learners and the economically disadvantaged. One way of measuring this growth is through significant changes in test scores between grades, especially third and fourth grades.
At a Sept. 24 Junction City School District board meeting, Laurel Principal Bill Bechen presented the board with updates on his school’s progress as a Focus School, which he’ll present at every board meeting.
Since the last board meeting, a leadership team with representatives from each grade level has been busy completing a comprehensive self-evaluation using an online tool available from the state. The tool offers more than 200 indicators found in high performing schools and asks that Laurel assess the level each of those indicators exist at Laurel. The state will then take the online input and help Laurel create a future plan.
The leadership team also will be traveling to conferences in Portland and Salem, with the state allocating $5,000 to support this initial self-assessment phase and learn about creating a comprehensive achievement plan.
“So far, the process has generated a lot of candid conversations and reflection about how we can improve student outcomes across the school,” Bechen said. “The leadership team has met many times since August and I want to acknowledge the time, energy and commitment these teachers are putting into the process on top of their classroom responsibilities. The entire group is engaged and positive about moving Laurel forward and improving student outcomes.”
For more information, visit the school website at www.junctioncity.k12.or.us/Laurel/ or make an appointment with Bechen at 541.998.2386.

 

In 2012, the Elementary and Secondary Education Act will implement the following features in Oregon schools:
Aligning achievement compacts that allow each district to describe how it will improve key student outcomes
Creating an accountability system so underserved students demonstrate academic growth and achieve higher graduation rates
Emphasizing individual student growth and demonstrating proficiency in reading and math
Customizing support plans to help struggling schools
Supporting professional growth through a collaborative teacher and administrator evaluation system

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PERS rate negotiated

Posted on 17 October 2012 by admin

Harrisburg high school leadership class sets high goals

By Vera Westbrook
For the Tribune
HARRISBURG – Increasing employer contribution rates for the Oregon Public Employees Retirement System (PERS) for the 2013-15 biennium have been negotiated and are compounding the losses already suffered from state education budget reductions seen during the last budget cycle.
Harrisburg School District Business Manager Debbie Darst presented some hard facts affecting the district budget at an Oct. 8 school board meeting after receiving news of the increase.
“For the 2013-15 school years, our combined rate will be 27.42 percent of payroll,” Darst said. “That is an increase of 6.74 percent, which is huge.”
The total increase to the district is estimated at $262,800 for the 2013-14 school year only, with the district already having set aside some money in contingency anticipating the rate increase.
“We estimated our savings including contingency will be about $220,000,” Darst said, a bit shy of the necessary $262,800. However, fiscal prudence dictates that the district maintain some minimum fund balance in contingency as insurance against unforeseen emergencies.
Darst reported that this year’s budget saw a $45,000 increase in the beginning fund balance with another $35,000 saved from employees taking a leave of absence combined with the hiring of less experienced teachers. But the hiring of a special education teacher at the high school will set the district back an additional $50,000.
School districts are eager to see the financial decisions made about education after the State Legislature convenes in January, as some larger school districts are determined to do something about this.
The good news is that additional revenue is expected after the July federal government’s reauthorization of the Secure Rural Schools Act for another year. The district should see funds from federal forest fees within the next few weeks. Last year the district received $54,000 and is expected to get 85 percent of that amount this year, or about $35,000 – $40,000.
Also at the meeting, representatives of the Harrisburg High School student leadership team announced their decision to pursue a ‘Heroes for a Day’ event for foster boys to mirror the ‘Princess for a Day’ event sponsored by the nonprofit organization ‘A Family for Every Child’ that occurs every year for girls in foster care.
“This is something that is not done across the nation,” leadership student Austin Dame said. “This would start here in Harrisburg.”
Students and Leadership instructor Ray White are dreaming big for this event, with plans to invite key male ‘hero’ figures from the community to spend the day mentoring foster boys from 18 months to 18 years old. The class plans to find sponsors to inundate the boys with gifts and manly pleasures to make the day an unforgettable adventure.
“We would love to get this started and be a part of it, as it is all for these foster children,” Dame said.

 

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Habitat seeking partner families

Posted on 17 October 2012 by admin

TRI-COUNTY – The Junction City/Harrisburg/Monroe Habitat for Humanity is looking for families interested in partnering with Habitat to build simple, decent, affordable housing. Interested families should attend one of the following Informational meetings: Monday, Oct. 22 at 7pm in the Harrisburg Justice Center, 354 Smith St. on Thursday, Oct. 25 at 7pm, at American Legion Hall, 605 Main St. in Monroe or Sunday, Oct. 28 at 2pm at Junction City Fire Hall, 1755 Juniper St. Program requirements and qualifications will be explained and applications will be available. Spanish translators will be at the meetings.
For more information, please call the Habitat office at 541.998.8548 or Lois Munson at 541.998.8565. For assistance in Spanish, please call Edgar Uriarte at 541.995.6548 or Luis Uriarte at 541.556.7576.

Habitat families earn the homes they help build and purchase the homes with zero- or low-interest mortgages. To qualify, families must live or work in Junction City, Harrisburg or Monroe, must currently be living in inadequate housing, have income between 30-60 percent of HUD‘s median income for our area, and be willing to partner by contributing 500 hours of ‘sweat equity’ on Habitat projects. For a family of four, the income requirements range from $1,468 to $4,710 per month. The income ranges are adjusted for family size.
Habitat for Humanity is currently building a house in partnership with Heather and Maxwell Franklin. The house is located at 500 South Sixth St. in Harrisburg. Volunteers are needed to assist with construction or to provide lunches for workers. If you are interested, please call Janet Dunham at 541.683.8543.

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Wanted Subject Possibly in the Area

Posted on 09 October 2012 by admin

Ronald Burbach
SUBJECT DESCRIPTION:
Height: 5’11”
Weight: 175 lbs
Hair: Grey
Eye Color: Brown
Age: 68 years old

Correction:  The original news release listed Burbach as being 78 years old, he is actually 68 years old.  He was on the Electronic Surveillance Program in Lane County, and we believe he fled to Missouri and is returning to Oregon.

The Lane County Sheriff’s Office is asking for assistance in locating Ronald Burbach who is currently wanted by law enforcement for Stalking and Violation of a Release Agreement.  Ronald Burbach was on the Electronic Surveillance Program when he fled the state, violating his release agreement.  We have received information that Burbach may be headed back to Oregon from Missouri.  Burbach was last reported driving a red Corvette with OR license plate 545BZT.

Burbach has made threats to kill his victim, law enforcement, and others, and is reported to be armed and dangerous. Do not attempt to apprehend this subject!

If you have information on the whereabouts of Ronald Burbach, please contact the Lane County Sheriff’s Office by dialing 911 or using our non-emergency line at 541-682-4141.

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New cars and chicken

Posted on 09 October 2012 by admin

Gibson Ford lot welcomes Guaranty and Lion’s BBQ

By Vera Westbrook
For the Tribune

JUNCTION CITY – Not much gets by folks driving down the main drag in Junction City. Noticing a formerly vacant lot full of new cars on Ivy Street, inquiring minds want to know what’s going on.
As part of its remodeling project, Guaranty Chevrolet is temporarily storing its new vehicle inventory for three weeks at the Gibson Ford lot on Ivy Street between 4th and 5th avenues. This remodel involves resurfacing the parking lot in front of the recently remodeled new-car showroom at the current Guaranty dealership location on the corner of Hwy. 99 and 1st Avenue.
“Guaranty made an arrangement with Citizen’s Bank to use that lot during our paving project and while a highway water pipe is being installed this month as part of the upgrade for the sewer and water system for the public and the projects going into the state mental health hospital and the prison project down the road,” said Shannon Nill, general manager of Guaranty RV dealership.
“All the new inventory is where the remodel is taking place, so it had to be moved off the pavement area so it could be resurfaced,” Executive Assistant Claire Gumbs said. “If people want to see our new inventory, we are just a couple blocks down the street temporarily.” Sales associates will accompany the cars and trucks moved to the Gibson Ford location.
“We have staff down there who love to talk to people about their next new vehicle,” Gumbs said.
Nill urges the public to visit the lot on Saturday and Sunday, Oct. 13 and 14 for the Lion’s Club Chicken Barbecue that will be held on the north half of the Gibson Ford lot. Guaranty will have most of its vehicles on the south half for folks to peruse during the barbecue.
“Take a test drive in a new or used vehicle next weekend and get a free Lion’s Club chicken barbecue lunch,” Nill said. “This gives a good opportunity to promote the Lion’s Club barbecue and show off a few vehicles.”
Nill also wants visitors to get acquainted with the Gibson lot and its building to spur other interest in the property.
“We are so pleased that Citizen’s Bank was able to help us,” Nill said, as the extra space made the paving project on the west half of the lot last Thursday a success. He was also pleased about “all the folks in Junction City that had stopped by to check on the project and see the pride in the project, as this is a real community plus for Junction City.”
For more information, contact Guaranty Chevrolet at 541.998.2333 on 20 Hwy. 99 South or visit the Gibson Ford lot.

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Oregon Electric Rail Service 100th anniversary

Oregon Electric Rail Service 100th anniversary

Posted on 09 October 2012 by admin

JUNCTION CITY – On Monday, Oct. 15, the Rodeo Steakhouse at 5th and Holly streets will host an open house from 4-7pm. The event is in honor of the 100th Anniversary of the beginning of Oregon Electric Railway passenger service between Portland and Eugene.
Members of the Pacific Northwest Chamber of the National Railway Historical Society are bringing display items to the event. Richard Thompson, author of the book ‘Willamette Valley Railways’ has been invited.
The Junction City Historical Society will have photographs and additional information about the history of the Oregon Electric Railway. Attendees can stay and enjoy the ‘Birthday Cake’.
The route began with five round trips daily which stopped in Junction City in front of the original depot which has been renovated and houses the restaurant.

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