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2013 Bobby Doess Classic 4

The Bobby Doerr Baseball Classic: Honoring a Hall of Famer

Posted on 01 July 2013 by admin

2013 Bobby Doess Classic 4
Submitted by Justin Carley
JUNCTION CITY – One of the greatest second baseman in baseball history was honored with the sixth annual Bobby Doerr Baseball Classic. The Classic is a youth baseball tournament honoring one of the greatest gentlemen to ever play the game, Boston Red Sox Hall of Famer Bobby Doerr.
This year the tournament attracted 32 teams to Junction City, including teams from Vancouver, West Linn, Salem, Roseburg, and one team from Junction City. Once again, The Classic was a great success and proved to be a competitive venue and a great atmosphere for the players and families.
One of the highlights of the Bobby Doerr Classic is the Opening Ceremony on Saturday.  During the Opening Ceremony all 32 teams join Bobby Doerr on the infield for the national anthem as a color guard from the United States Marine Corp presents the nation’s flag. The field is surrounded with American flags donated by the local Veteran’s of Foreign Wars. The ceremony is capped off with the Red Sox Hall of Famer throwing out the ceremonial first pitch.
The Bobby Doerr Classic has divisions for 10 & under, 12U, and 14U.  The road to the championship has extra incentive as the winning team’s players were awarded with an autographed baseball signed by Doerr; and the winning team was presented with a Hall of Fame bat from Cooperstown signed by the Hall of Famer.  The Junction City Red Sox won first place in the 10U Silver Division.

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Train Travel; It Was a Dark and Stormy Night: UFF DA

Posted on 01 July 2013 by admin

By Noel Ness
My friends, I don’t know about you but my vacations have never gone smoothly. Something always happens. I’ve come to expect it. And actually enjoy it. I mean one’s got to laugh at some of the goofy things that happen to us while on our journeys. The train trip started out so well. We had perfect sailing on our train, “The Empire Builder,” through the Columbia Gorge and Glacier National Park. Seeing the Gorge and Glacier Park, from a train, is a wonderment.
We were actually ahead of schedule for our destination at Midway Station in St. Paul, Minnesota. The wife and I are both from southwestern Minnesota. But I digress.
The trip started to go sideways in Montana. The train stopped because an Ice Storm was ahead. The ice storm blew for six hours. I looked through the window as we passed by the storm’s damage. I was amazed to see telephone poles, for as far as the eye could see, all snapped off and laying on the frozen tundra. They were in perfect alignment. The poles were snapped off 3 feet from their base. It was a dark and stormy night when Mother Nature really let her hair down. I got to hand it to Amtrak folks. They watched over us. Made sure we were not in harm’s way.
We were held up once again in Northern North Dakota because of flooding. Amtrak rerouted our train. My friends, through all this adversity we were warm, cozy and had plenty of chow. Battered but not beaten, we pulled into Midway Station 10 hours late. I’ve decided, it took me 30 years, to only travel by train in the warm summer months or early fall.
Departing Midway Station, a month later, we began the journey back home to Oregon. Once again we entered into the flood zone of North Dakota. Flood water actually lapped at the train wheels as we moved oh so slowly. The train stopped after we traversed the flood water.
The conductor announced crew members were going to look for debris under the train. They found a cow, two sheep and six very large carp.
I’m now going to ask lady admirers of my column to stop reading until I have a little chat with the men.
Manly men of Junction City, as you all know, women are the weaker sex. OKAY, let’s all laugh together. Millions of years ago women gathered in a cave and had a ladies meeting. It was decided they would ACT as the weaker sex so their cave men would go out and kill the saber tooth tiger, wooly mammoth and other fierce creatures. The ladies decided we’ll just cook the food and be the gatherers. Let the men be the hunters and kill themselves providing the chow. The minutes of that cave ladies meeting have been passed on to the women of today.
Ladies you may continue reading. I thank you for your patience and understanding.
Where was I? Oh yes, flooding. We modern cave men must put on a brave face for the little lady when faced with danger. They are the weaker sex. You Betcha! I was furiously reading the Superliner Customer Safety Instructions trying to keep the fear out of my eyes. I looked at the wife. The wife seemed as content as a June bug on a rose petal. I bet she was reading the minutes of the cave women’s meeting.
We finally made in through the floods of North Dakota. I swear I saw Noah’s Ark off in the distance. The ark was possibly heading to Fargo, North Dakota and a really big Motel 6. “We’ll leave the Light on for You.”
We entered Montana. Just when you think things can’t possibly get any worse they do. All part of Life’s Rich Pageant.
The train was clipping along at 80 miles per hour and then pulled to a stop. The conductor announced a freight train, owned by Warren Buffet, broke down and was blocking the tracks. I wish we had broken down in a place with scenery like Glacier National Park or the Columbia Gorge. But no, we broke down in a gravel pit. The train crew opened the doors and passengers stumbled out. I looked at my fellow passengers. They were enjoying themselves. Kids were playing, folks were trading stories and a good time was happening in the gravel pit. Granted we looked liked the Donner Party but hey, there was no snow. I never saw one frown or heard one complaint. Amtrak folks are resilient. We were there so long Dominos’ Pizza added us to their delivery route.
We were fortunate to meet Art Peterson, Ph.D., and the Director, Archivist of the Railroad Station Historical Society in the gravel pit. The RRSHS founded in 1968, is a non-profit corporation devoted to the study of railroad depots, towers, roundhouses, bridges, and other railroad structures. The Society is an educational and research organization collecting data and preserving it for the future. It was so cool to meet Dr. Art. Here I am trying to formulate train stories and I’m sharing a sleeper car with a train buff. The Railroad Station Historical Society maintains a database of existing railroad structures at: http://www.rrshs.org
Mr. Buffet, 4-hours later, had his train repaired and we started moving. The conductor, announced over the intercom, “Mr. Buffet brought his repair crew by Wells Fargo Stage Coach.”  We all got a chuckle out of that. The conductor announced we had indeed gotten low on food but not to worry. We were stopping in Pasco, Washington where we would be treated to Kentucky Fried Chicken. We stopped and everybody got a bucket of KFC and it was a true wonderment. I later read a news story about the manager of Pasco’s KFC.  Poor fella, after we left, he was committed to a facility for the really, really abnormal. Apparently, the size of Amtrak’s order unhinged him.
We finally made it to hearth and home, greeted the cat and all was right with the world.

Uffdamay007@gmail.com

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2013 picnic volunteer plaque recipients

Habitat For Humanity House Groundbreaking In Monroe July 7 :House To Be Built In Honor Of John Gray

Posted on 01 July 2013 by admin

2013 picnic volunteer plaque recipients
Submitted by Jon Silvermoon
MONROE – Junction City/Harrisburg/Monroe Habitat for Humanity will hold a groundbreaking ceremony for its seventeenth house at 607 North 9th in Monroe on Sunday, July 7 from 2-3:30pm. This house will be built in honor of the late John Gray and in partnership with the Jones-Nowlin Family: Jessica Jones-Nowlin, Corey Youngren, Taylor (14), Brooke (12), Lexus (7), Lena (6), Bryson (3), and Blain (2).
House construction is being financed by donations from friends and family of John Gray including Walsh Construction Company and its employees. Born in Ontario, John Gray grew up in a farmer’s tenant house near Monroe, graduating from Monroe High School. After serving in the army’s 82nd Airborne Division in World War II, he had a successful career in the chain saw business at Omark Industries. He became a developer and was responsible for some of the northwest‘s most prominent resorts including Salishan, Sunriver, and Skamania Lodge. A founding member of 1000 Friends of Oregon, he was a prominent land use planning advocate.  Later in life, he became known for his philanthropic efforts including the $500,000 challenge grant that helped fund construction of the new Monroe Community Library. He also contributed $2 million to Habitat for Humanity of Oregon for land acquisition.
The Jones-Nowlin family is expected to move into the John Gray house sometime before Thanksgiving. Jessica, her family, and their friends and relatives will contribute 500 “sweat equity” hours to Habitat for Humanity before she purchases their new home.
Junction City/Harrisburg/Monroe Habitat for Humanity is a “nonprofit, ecumenical Christian housing organization building simple, decent, affordable housing in partnership with people in need.” Since its 1995 founding, the chapter has built or rehabilitated 16 simple and decent homes for low to moderate-income families. For information call 998-9548 or visit www.jchmhabitat.org.

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Memorial Wreath

Harrisburg VFW News

Posted on 01 July 2013 by admin

Memorial Wreath

Submitted by Loretta Stegner
The Harrisburg VFW Post 2105 and Auxiliary have had several events this spring, starting on May 13 with installation of officers. New officers are Post Commander Rick Wagner, Sr. Vice Commander Chris Balm, Jr. Vice Commander Quentin Nelson, Quartermaster Dick Peterson, and Chaplin Charles Christensen. For the Auxiliary, new officers are President Margaret Kimbro, Sr. Vice President Mavis Stegner, Jr. Vice President Maxine Carlsen, Treasurer Loretta Stegner, Chaplin Maxine Carlsen, and Conductress Kay Dittmar. Installing officers were Marvin Stegner and Mavis Stegner.
The Post and Auxiliary members assembled at 8am on May 25 at Alford Cemetery to place flags marking the graves of servicemen and women. They proceeded to the Masonic, Workman and Union Point Cemeteries, placing a total of 240 flags. They were assisted by Scouts and their parents.
Once again on Memorial Day the aging members of the Post and Auxiliary assembled at 8am to hold ceremonies at the flagpole by the river. A wreath of fresh flowers was dropped from the bridge; as it passed into view at the Gazebo, Taps was played. The wreath symbolizes those lost or buried at sea. The group then proceeded to each of the three cemeteries for flag ceremonies. They were assisted by Scout Troop 89.
A special thank-you to the unknown young couple with a baby, who paid for breakfast at The Grub Stake for the seven members who traditionally have breakfast after Flag placements. The kindness in remembering those who have served is gratefully acknowledged.

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Weeds & tall grass

Eliminating Tall Grass Nuisances

Posted on 10 June 2013 by admin

Weeds & tall grass
It is the time of year when city employees are on the lookout for grasses and weeds that have gotten too tall. Grass and weeds over 10” in height are big enough to start generating seeds that can spread into neighbors yards, planting strips, and anywhere else they are generally not wanted.  Once the weather starts drying them out, they become a fire hazard too. Plus, if you‘ve ever had to sell or refinance a home, assessors will take a look at your neighborhood. Properties with overly tall vegetation tend to bring down values for the entire neighborhood.
Property owners in Junction City, Harrisburg, and Monroe are required by city ordinances to eliminate weeds, thistles, briars, or grass exceeding 10 inches in height on their property or in the public way abutting their property, or the City may abate such nuisance and the property owner fined.  For example, in Monroe the fine can be up to $100. Junction City calculates the total amount incurred by the city based on the record of expense and labor hours, plus a charge of $10 or 10% of the total amount incurred (whichever is the greater) for administrative overhead.  Harrisburg can charge nuisance abatements at $60 an hour, with administrative charges and charges for equipment. Unpaid abatement bills can become a lien on the property.
Offending property owners are notified in a variety of ways. The past year in Monroe, Chief Smith has done the local review for the city, which then sends out notices to those individuals in violation, giving them 10 days to take care of the problem. “Otherwise we respond to neighbor complaints or city staff as we drive through town and note problems,” stated Jim Minard, Chief Operating Officer for Monroe.
Junction City sends a 10-day written notice of violation to the persons responsible for the nuisances.
Harrisburg Public Works generally starts sending out notices in April. Occupants are given 15 days to take care of the tall grass and weeds. The City of Harrisburg is willing to work with property owners, so call 541-995-6655 to let them know you are working on a solution.

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SKMBT_C35313060709490

The Track Is Back: Local Youths Find A Niche In Motocross

Posted on 10 June 2013 by admin

SKMBT_C35313060709490By Vera Westbrook
TRI-COUNTY – With the resurgence of a local racetrack, several middle-school boys have seized the opportunity to improve their motocross skills and race.
In the area for nearly fifty years, the Territorial Motocross Park came out of a short hiatus in January with new owners and a new name: Eugene MX. The track is located on Territorial Road near the elementary school and is open to the public.
“It’s back alive with Mike Miller running it,” said Ken Jamieson of Junction City Muffler who appreciates driving his son, Mitchell, a short five miles to the track. “It’s been a good time—the kids and parents are into it.”
This family-oriented park provides an additional source of local entertainment with several tracks available for riders of all ages and all levels of difficulty on all sizes of dirt bikes from 50cc to 450cc. The track is also challenging with doubles, triples, whoops, staircases and big uphills and downhills.
Since the track opened in January, Ken’s son and three other boys have been practicing several nights a week and then racing on weekends, reaching faster speeds each week.
Track owner Mike Miller from Springfield is a racer himself and father to motocross champion ‘Mad Max’ Miller, a fourth grader who recently won four AMA (American Motorcyclist Association) national motocross titles. Mad Max has been racing in competitions across the U.S. for several years now at places like the world class Loretta Lynn motocross track in Tennessee.
“He’s the fastest kid on a 65cc in the nation,” Ken said. “It’s been fortunate for us and our kids to hang out and race with him—the kids look up to him.” The Miller family enjoys interacting with other racers on the track, as does local racing legend Skeet Hise, who’s seen racing and prepping the track.
Once the track opened, “we all went out and got bikes, got the kids suited up with the best neck braces, knee braces, pants and boots—they look like they are ready to go Gladiator jousting,” Ken said.
Amazed by the progress the boys have made in a short time, Ken said, “We finished out our season at Eugene MX—we did about four races, and now we’re going to Albany MX and racing with those guys.” The team is also drawing in local sponsors like JC Muffler Shop, Dari Mart, OrCal, Langdon Farms and MotoGear.
“These kids try so hard. Last week at Albany we were running third and fourth. Both our boys went down in the whoop section,” Ken said. “It’s a pretty tough competition with about 10 to 15 riders on the track at the same time.”
Ken believes motocross is a great form of family fun. “It’s been awesome for me to get to know each and every kid and their parents,” Ken said. Ken also comes from a racing family, with Mitchell a third generation motorcycle racer. “When my dad sees his grandson racing, it just fires him up!”
The racing team is made up of the following fifth and sixth graders between the ages of 11 and 13 who attend Oaklea and Harrisburg middle schools: Skyler Guth, Cameron Horn, Mitchell Jamieson and Wyatt Perry. The boys also play football together at school, “but right now they are all into motocross and they’re all really fast,” Ken said.
Safety and fun are important, as is competition, Ken said. “We’ve been on the podium about three times,” he said, but he expects the kids to be winning more often after a little more practice.

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DSC00170

Do It Yourself: Local Quarry Assists With Summer Projects

Posted on 10 June 2013 by admin

DSC00170
By Vera Westbrook
TRI-COUNTY – The days of postponing projects because of rain are over. For outdoor work and improvements, it’s prime time for land stewards to consider Conser Quarry for their rock and heavy equipment needs.
Founded by John and Margaret Conser, the Junction City quarry located on Ferguson Road has been assisting the tri-county area with building and outdoor projects since the 1940s. After the couple retired, George and Marian Tracer took over the business in 1964, keeping the original name.
The Tracers are a local couple with George born in Junction City and Marian coming to the area from Iowa. The couple had four kids, with their daughter, Kathy, taking an interest in the business.
“I’ve been around here all my life,” Kathy says.
After the Tracers retired in the 1990s, Kathy and her husband, Don Kling, took over the business with help from her folks until about five years ago. Today, the Klings run the business themselves, keeping it in the family with help from Kathy’s son, Trever, and daughter, Traci. A staff of seven including family members keeps the Conser hometown appeal by personally serving the public.
“We deliver rock and we fix people’s driveways or parking areas,” Kathy says, describing some of the services Conser provides. “We also have building stones for people to pick through,” for those seeking a desired size and shape for creative rock work in fire pits, fireplaces and flower beds.
An onsite rock crusher produces crushed basalt ranging in eight sizes from three-eighths to six inches, available in both ‘minus’ and ‘open.’ These sizes are commonly used on roadways and building pads and can be delivered by truck in loads of 10-12 yards or 20-24 yards.
“Folks can also haul the rock themselves,” Kathy says.
Aside from crushed rock, Conser staff provides expert assistance with heavy equipment operation and rental along with rock craftsmanship. “My son likes to make rock walls and water features,” Kathy says. He also operates equipment like excavators for use on roads and building sites.
Uses for rock around the home include landscaping, drainage, filling potholes and supporting raised flowerbeds. Heavy equipment services provided by Conser include preparing home pads, digging out sites for buildings and parking areas, backfilling ditches and foundations, and grading driveways.
Call Conser Quarry for more information at 541-998.- 493 on M-F from 7am-4:30pm and on Saturdays from 7am-noon, or drop by the quarry on 27387 Ferguson Rd.

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